• Chinese Exclusion Act 1882
    623 words
    Chinese Exclusion Act 1882 The Chinese Exclusion Act was passed in 1882. The Chinese Exclusion Act was not passed because of fear of increasing population the United States. It was passed because of racism. It was also passed because Americans were scared of losing their jobs. Chinese were sought for jobs in mines and railroads. Racial tensions increased as more and more Chinese emigrated, occupied jobs, and created competition for jobs. The Chinese came to America in search of opportunities. O...
  • Chinese Prostitution Women Prostitutes Yung
    1,462 words
    In 1850, only 7 Chinese women were in San Francisco compared to the 4, 018 Chinese men. These lows numbers could " ve been because Chinese men were afraid to bring their wives and raise families in a place full of racial violence. The growing anti-Chinese sentiment and few labor opportunities reduced the chances for entry of Chinese women. The few women in San Francisco's Chinatown basically turned Chinatown into a bachelor's society. Many men went to brothel houses to release their sexual tensi...
  • Sociological Factors Chinese Families Economic
    728 words
    Sociological Factors Shape Family Strategies Traditional studies of Chinese-American family life tend to focus purely on cultural determinants, focusing on Chinese traditions and values. A highly favorable attitude towards these families is brought forth by these studies, and these families are thought to be culturally stronger than other minority groups facing difficulties. These determinants are not the only ways in which these families can be characterized, however. The socio-economic determi...
  • Chinese Immigration To North America
    498 words
    Chinese Immigration to North America This essay will show how and why the first Chinese immigrants came to North America, the events that occured in those times, and the contrast between how the first Chinese Canadians and the Chinese of today have been treated. The first immigrants that came from China to Canada began to come soon after the American Revolutionary War. There were immigrants before them, but very, very few. Around 1790, students, merchants, and sailors began to come to America an...
  • Chinese Immigration United States
    1,436 words
    Chinese Immigration It happens everyday before our very eyes. Occurring since long before we can remember, immigration has now become a common place idea. People move because of various reasons such as opportunity, persecution, or just plain wanting a new life. The reasons for immigration are important, as well are the results that arise from that change in location. The United States is widely known to harvest the most immigrants from around the world, but more specifically, the immigration of ...
  • Chinese Immigration Into The U S
    1,466 words
    (TITLE) Chinese Immigration into the United States: From Railroad Worker to Businessman Table of Contents Body... pages 3-7 Important Laws and Decisions... pages 8-10 References... page 11 Immigration into the United States by persons from foreign nations is not as it used to be. The immigration system which exists today has evolved from many regulations, restrictions and quotas. The Chinese people came from their country in the mid 1860 s mostly as rail workers. Today most come as businessmen ...
  • Chinese Immigration United States
    484 words
    Chinese Immigration In 1784, the United States began relations with China when the American trading ship Empress of China arrived in Canton, China from New York, thus welcoming the opening of China Trade. Significant Chinese immigration began with the California gold rush in 1849, and continued throughout the nineteenth century as thousands of Chinese emigrated to the United States due to economic dislocation in China, when millions of peasants were forced off the land in search of food and work...
  • Mrs Spring Fragrance Chinese American Tradition
    538 words
    Mrs. Spring Fragrance Sui Sin Far portrays the effects of "Americanization" on the Chinese who arrived in America during the early 1900's, in her story of "Mrs. Spring Fragrance." She describes the processes that the Chinese characters in the story undergo as they slowly begin to accept the American culture as their own. She shows how they become "Americanized", yet shows how they are still rooted in the Chinese tradition. The piece is presented in a lighthearted tone yet deals with issues of na...
  • Black And Chinese Americans
    549 words
    In the present day, people view America as a land where everyone can be seen equal to one another, but this was not always the case. In the 1800 s black and Chinese Americans went through a ruthless period of discrimination, due to the white man's ignorance. Even though the Chinese and blacks were singled out they both were treated differently but also had many similarities. Harsh treatment, long hours, and extremely low wages were only a small part of the brutal-ness both races faced. The Chine...
  • Chinese United States
    1,744 words
    Chinese Immigration Every person who lives in America is either an immigrant or a descendant of an immigrant. Though we may not consider it, it is a fact that everyone here has come from some other place. The majority of immigrants have come to America voluntarily. Seeking a change they envisioned America as country thriving with different opportunities. For the immigrants it was a chance at a better life, not only for themselves, but for their children. It is estimated that over sixty million ...
  • Chinese Americans American Identities America
    978 words
    Chinese Americans The focus of our group project is on Chinese Americans. We studied various aspects of their lives and the preservation of their culture in America. The Chinese American population is continually growing. In fact, in 1990, they were the largest group of Asians in the United States (Min 58). But living in America and adjusting to a new way of life is not easy. Many Chinese Americans have faced and continue to face much conflict between their Chinese and American identities. But ...
  • Chinese Culture North American
    851 words
    Chinese Culture China has about five thousand years history which is a very long period of time. Also, the Chinese civilization was growing with these periods of time and it will continues greater than ever. Many wars and unhappiness es were happening during this period. Although, the time has passed, the histories and the civilizations have not passed. These family virtues, serious, working attitudes, sense of justice and the great Confucian tradition have been deeply assimilated into the Chine...
  • Chinese Immigrants United States
    423 words
    Chinese Immigrants lived in really poor conditions. Small rooms were packed full of 20 to 30 immigrants. Rats and mice were everywhere, and catching diseases were often and deadly. Since there were no good vaccinations, many died from diseases caught from their workers. Sometimes the dirt would be inches high. Living in these conditions would be very harsh, yet still more and more immigrants from China came to mine and work on the railroad. The Chinese played a very important, yet dangerous job...
  • The Chinese Ethnic Group
    2,552 words
    Andrew Brennan The Chinese Ethnic Group Introduction The ethnic group that I have selected to discuss in this term paper is that of the Chinese. In this paper I will present information on the Asian American identity, Chinese immigration and geographical concentration as well as population growth and other aspect all in the hope to explain the Chinese diverse and growing presence here in the United States. Asian American Identity The Asian American population is booming. Between 1980 and 1990 th...
  • Chinese Art China Paintings Years
    735 words
    Chinese Art The Chinese culture is a very interesting topic to learn about. They have many beliefs, customs and traditions that make them unique. Art was very important to the Chinese culture. It was a way to express or symbolize emotions. The Chinese display many different styles as well as techniques to express who they truly are and believe. Art began in China in stone structures. Large carvings were carried out by families rather than one particular person. Throughout the years, Chinese art...
  • Tibetan Genocide Tibet Chinese People
    363 words
    For 48 years, China has occupied Tibet. In Tibet's history, there has been over 17 percent of the Tibetan people killed, and 6, 000 monasteries ruined. For starters, Tibet was never part of China. During the first few years when China was in control of Tibet, the Chinese declared that Tibet should be part of China, because an Emperor of Tibet once married a Chinese princess. Years later, the Chinese said that Tibet was part of China because of the warrior Genghis Khan. Genghis Khan and the Mong...
  • Chinese Culture American Values Abc
    1,218 words
    Socialization American Born Chinese Children under Chinese Culture According to the American Heritage Dictionary, socialization is "the process of learning interpersonal and interaction al skills that are in conformity with the values of one's society" (American Heritage). It is a process of learning culture. During socialization, children will acquire attitudes, norms, values, behaviors, personalities, etc. within agencies of socialization, which were described as "Agencies of socialization are...
  • The Asian Experience In America
    1,865 words
    There have been people from many different countries, nations, and religions who have decided to migrate from other places to the United States throughout history. But perhaps none have come in more mass than the Chinese. With declining economic and political conditions at home, many literally saw coming to the United States as a "golden" opportunity. Once arriving here though, many found out it wasn't as opportune as they thought. The immigration of Asians to America was a big part of American ...
  • Assimilation Social Externalities
    875 words
    Chinese Anglo-Conformists Assimilation into a society is difficult for anyone, yet is especially difficult for those who have social externalities. Social externalities are those that are visible, physical qualities. There are three forms of assimilation: Anglo-conformity, melting pot, and cultural pluralism. The form of assimilation found in the article, For Chinese in USA, all is not happy by Mei-Mei Chan (USA TODAY) is Anglo-conformity. Anglo-conformity is the become like me form of assimilat...
  • Racism On The Goldfields
    916 words
    For a few short years, from the beginning of the 1850 s to the early 60 s, thousands of people flocked to Australia. The ships that brought them often swung empty at their moorings as both crews and passengers swarmed inland toward makeshift camps. The lure was gold. With so many immigrants from different countries assembled on the goldfields, it wasn't long until threats to social stability were magnified in the form of racism. One of the main driving forces behind this racism was competition o...