• Irish Immigrants In Boston
    1,347 words
    ... il dren in the Irish district [North End]," wrote Bostonian Lemuel Shattuck, "seemed literally born to die." Diseases thrived in places that had poor drainage, ventilation and were crowded, perfectly describing the Irish districts. During the cholera epidemic of Boston in 1849-50 a health committee was sent in to investigate. The committee reported that the disease had badly affected the majority of the Irish community of Boston: The average age of Irish life in Boston does not exceed fourte...
  • Irish Immigrants In Boston
    2,785 words
    The life of Irish immigrants in Boston was one of poverty and discrimination. The religiously centered culture of the Irish has along with their importance on family has allowed the Irish to prosper and persevere through times of injustice. Boston's Irish immigrant population amounted to a tenth of its population. Many after arriving could not find suitable jobs and ended up living where earlier generations had resided. This attributed to the "invisibility" of the Irish. Much of the very early m...
  • British Irish Relations Over The Past 300 Years
    1,241 words
    British- Irish relations over the past three hundred years have been troubled. There have been many tensions caused by religion in Northern Ireland and Britain's unfair rule of Northern Ireland. The British are guilty of many of the indignities suffered by the Irish people. They are also guilty of causing all of the religious and territorial conflicts between Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland. The division between Northern and Southern Ireland dates back to the 16 th century. A succe...
  • Irish Potato Famine Mass Starvation
    663 words
    One hundred fifty years ago in the late summer of 1845 one of the greatest human ecological disasters in the history of the world began in Ireland. A fungus from North America established itself in Ireland and commenced to destroy the potato crop. When the fungus had run its course at least 1 1/1 million, possibly as many as 2 million, Irish had died and another 1 1/2 million had emigrated. No one can fully capture in words the magnitude or the intensity of the suffering and hardship endured by ...
  • Irish Immigration 1800 1880
    2,154 words
    INTRODUCTION The history of Ireland "that most distressful nation" is full of drama and tragedy, but one of the most interesting stories is about what happened to the Irish during the mid-nineteenth century and how millions of Irish came to live in America (Purcell 31). Although the high point of the story was the years of the devastating potato famine from 1845 to 1848, historians have pointed out that immigrating from Ireland was becoming more popular before the famine and continued until the ...
  • The Potato Famine United States
    2,724 words
    "We are talking about one of the greatest tragedies Of the nineteenth century." -Ian Gibson Irish-American. To some, this term merely designates one of the many ethnic groups which can be found in the United States; but to those who are Irish-American, it represents a people who faced a disaster of mammoth proportions and who managed to survive at great cost. The Great Hunger of 1845 changed, or more often, destroyed the lives of millions of Irish, causing them to seek refuge from poverty and st...
  • Native American Irish Americans Boundaries
    405 words
    Many people would agree that the Irish have been successful in assimilating into American culture and the Native American has been unsuccessful. There have been many boundaries that both groups have encountered but they are more of a hardship for the Native American. These include Racial and Cultural boundaries, Personal boundaries, Sociological boundaries, Political and Economic boundaries, and Geographical boundaries. Racial and Cultural boundaries are probably the hardest obstacle that Native...
  • Yeats Biography Lady Gregory
    432 words
    William Butler Yeats was born in Dublin, Ireland, on June 13, 1865. He was the eldest son of a painter. In 1867 his family moved to London, but he frequently visited his grandparents in Northern Ireland. There he was greatly influenced by the folklore of the region. In 1881 his family returned to Dublin. Their Yeats studied at the Metropolitan School of Art. During school he became more focused on literature. Yeats made his debut in 1885, with the publication of his first poems in The Dublin Un...
  • Irish Stereotypes Ireland Jobs England
    514 words
    Irish Stereotypes The Irish people have been on the receiving end of many racial stereotypes. When they migrated to America because of lack of jobs, poor living conditions, and many other reasons they were treated as the lowest member of the social class. They were given jobs that were thought to be too unsafe for blacks to carry out because the loss of a slave was an out of pocket expense (Kinsella, 2002). But The Irish were not only discriminated against in America, but in their own country as...
  • The Irish People One America
    1,807 words
    Ireland has a great history of war, famine, despair, and hardship. Throughout the years the Irish have come from the lowest of lows to the highest of highs. In this paper I will give a history of the Irish people before coming to America, what it was coming here, how they were welcomed to their new home, and how they are faring now. I will also expose many of the stereotypes that the Irish have pinned to them and the reason that they are there. In the early 1800's, the Irish had great success in...
  • Irish American Culture Northern Ireland
    3,420 words
    Irish-American Culture and Society Throughout the course of time, Ireland has suffered many losses. Ireland has been conquered, invaded, repressed, and tormented over many centuries. Because of Ireland s isolation and separation from the rest of the world, Irish history is very rich. Although Ireland had to live apart from the world, the people prevailed as a community that was, and still is very influential tothe rest of the world. Ireland has a very interesting social culture. The people and ...
  • Irish Rennaissance James Joyce
    3,078 words
    In the heart of every Irishman hides a poet, burning with nationalistic passion for his beloved Emerald Isle. It is this same passion which for centuries Great Britain has attempted to snuff out of the Catholics of Ireland with tyrannical policies and the domination of the Protestant religion. Irish Catholics were treated like second-class citizens in their native home. Centuries of oppression churned in the hearts of the Irish and came to a boil in the writings and literature of the sons and da...
  • Irish Folk Music Traditional Tunes Today
    548 words
    In ancient Ireland, music was an important part of life. It was played for Kings, Chiefs, and also for entertainment of the people. The first Irish tunes were played primarily on the harp. Professional harpers were honored above all other musicians and earned a high reputation for their music. After a horrific war in Ireland in 1607, there was a heavy blow to the Gaelic order. Many towns were destroyed, and several of the music schools were shut down. Because most of the tunes were transmitted ...
  • Irish Ireland Culture Irishmen
    489 words
    During the 1840's in Ireland, there was a terrible potato famine. Many people died. Those who didn't came to America, where the streets were "paved with gold." Or in this case, potatoes. When the Irish arrived here, however, they found the streets were not paved with gold, or even the beloved potato. The store owners and other employers would not hire the Irish because the Irish like to drink aplenty. It is true that Ireland is home to some of the finest beer in world, and the Irish drink it; of...
  • Ireland Easter Rebellion Home Rule
    930 words
    The years leading up to the Easter Rebellion in Ireland in 1916 were marked by significant political, cultural and military developments. The Easter Rebellion was a complete failure but without it, Ireland might never have been free from British Rule. Conflict between Ireland and Britain commenced in 1169, when Henry II attempted to invade Ireland and was unsuccessful. In the centuries that followed the British made many attempts to take control of Irish lands to build a superior empire. During ...
  • Ireland During World War Two
    1,266 words
    The Irish during the times of 1941 to 1945 faced many difficult decisions and had to make sure any actions they took bettered their country. With World War II being the largest war the world had ever seen, involvement at any level meant a lot to a country and would shape relations with other countries for a long time to come. Ireland was torn between its hatred of Britain and its conscience when the time came to pick sides. On one hand, the Irish hated Britain to a great extent; on the other, th...
  • Saint Patrick Irish Day Ireland
    1,025 words
    Saint Patrick's birth is the most important event in the medieval era. The goal of this essay is to show and prove why Saint Patrick is the most important figure in the medieval era. Saint Patrick is the most important figure in the medieval era because even today, everyone who is anyone knows who St. Patrick is. Whether this is because he is the reason for the day that everyone is Irish or not, one can not deny that he has had a widespread influence on the world. St. Patrick is one of Christia...
  • Irish Immigration To America
    2,302 words
    Irish Immigration to America There are multiple reasons why groups immigrate to the United States: liberty; whether it be political or religious, the desire for a better life, or in the case of the Irish: starvation. The agricultural collapse of Ireland, widely known as the Great Potato Famine, forced 4. 5 million Irish to come to the U. S. between 1840 and 1914. As discussed in the course, this makes them the first major non-protestant group to enter the US, immediately causing Americans to per...
  • A Brief Study Of British Ethnic Groups
    478 words
    One of the most striking features of the British Population since the turn of the century has been its growth in the number of its third world ex-colonial population from negligible proportions to the present time where coloured ethnics account for 5% of the total population of Britain. Peach, Robinson, Matted and Chance (PRM C) argue that this immigration can be broadly defined as Irish in the nineteenth, Jewish at the beginning of the twentieth century and predominantly West Indian and South A...
  • Nationalism And Reform Irish Germans American
    659 words
    AP American HistoryEarly American Nationalism And ReformA P American HistoryEarly American Nationalism And Reform The rise of immigration in the mid 17 th century lead to a spirit of national reform in the United States. Many Europeans, particularly the Irish and the German, immigrated to America during the 1800 s. There were many different reasons for their immigration, and when they came they influenced American culture greatly. The United States changed religiously, because of the German and ...