• Watergate White House
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    ton, D. C. , on the evening of June 17, 1972. 2 They were there to plant electronic bugging devices in the telephones of top Democratic party officials. Once caught, these seven 'plumbers,' as they were called by the media -- including one E. Howard Hunt, a former U. S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) agent and writer of spy novels who was working for the Nixon ReElection Committee -- were, in time, traced to the White House. That bungled effort to break into the Democratic party headquarter...
  • Watergate White House
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    The tapes The hearings held by the Senate Watergate Committee, in which Dean was the star witness and in which many other former key administration officials gave dramatic testimony, were broadcast through most of the summer, causing devastating political damage to Nixon. The Senate investigators also discovered a crucial fact on July 13: Alexander Butterfield, deputy assistant to the President, revealed during an interview with a committee staff member that a taping system in the White House au...
  • Watergate Was The Nixon White House Involved
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    Watergate: Was The Nixon White House Involved? What was Watergate? 'Watergate' is a term used to describe a complex web of political scandals occurring between 1972 and 1974. On January 20, 1969, Richard M. Nixon had become the thirty-seventh president of the United States. As Nixon entered the White House, he was "full of bitterness and anger about past defeats, and about years of perceived slights from others in the political establishment." Nixon, a Republican, once stated that, "Washington i...
  • All The President's Men
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    All The President's Men Richard Nixon's first term as president will always be connected with the Watergate scandal, the biggest political scandal in United States history. Various illegal activities were conducted including burglary, wire tapping, violations of campaign financing laws, sabotage, and attempted use of government agencies to harm political opponents to help Richard Nixon win reelection in the 1972 presidential elections. There were about 40 people charged with crimes related to th...
  • Watergate Scandal White House
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    The Watergate scandal had everything. Nixon disgraced the presidency by lying to the country and abusing his power and his committees were involved in illegal acts and a big cover up, all leading to little side roads of corruption and lies. Watergate is by far one of the worst presidential scandals in the history of the United States. In the story of Watergate, five burglars were found breaking into democratic offices at the Watergate complex in Washington DC. The break-in was passed off as just...
  • United States V Nixon President Of The United States
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    United States v. Nixon, President of the United States Throughout American history, the fear that our leaders may sometimes think themselves above the law has always been evident. The fear is that power brings corruptness. To prevent this, however, the system of checks and balances has been installed into the Constitution. No one branch of government stands above the law in this setup. This point was reasserted in the the Supreme Court case of 1974, United States v. Nixon. This case involved th...
  • Watergate Scandal White House
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    Watergate Scandal Watergate was a designation of a major U. S. scandal that began with the burglary and wiretapping of the Democratic party's headquarters, later engulfed President Richard M. Nixon and many of his supporters in a variety of illegal acts and culminated in the first resignation of a U. S. president. The burglary was committed on June 17, 1972, by five men who were caught in the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate apartment and office complex in Washingto...
  • The United States Of America Vs Richard M Nixon
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    The United States of America vs. Richard M. Nixon Issue In this case, the court is asked to decide if the president in the Watergate robberies and if he had the right to invoke Executive Privilege. Facts During the campaign of President Nixon's second term, a group of burglars working for the committee to re-elect the President broke into the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate office-apartment complex in Washington DC, apparently in search of political intelligenc...
  • Watergate A Political Powdercake Exploding In Public Cynics
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    Watergate, the popular name for the political scandal and constitutional crisis which broke out in 1972 during the presidential reign of Richard Nixon, remains a mysterious happening even today. Some details, people, events, degrees of involvement, and reasons are still unresolved. But what began as a third-rate burglary on June 17, 1972 escalated into a full-blown scandal that had a resounding effect on how many Americans viewed the government of their country. Richard Nixon's presidency and Wa...
  • President Richard M Nixon
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    Watergate, designation of a major U. S. political scandal that began with the burglary and wiretapping of the Democratic party's campaign headquarters, later engulfed President Richard M. Nixon and many of his supporters in a variety of illegal acts, and culminated in the first resignation of a U. S. president. The burglary was committed on June 17, 1972, by five men who were caught in the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate apartment and office complex in Washington, ...
  • Watergate White House
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    Watergate In June of 1972 an event occurred that changed the course of history. On June 12, 1972 there was a break-in at the Watergate Hotel. When the police arrived they found 5 men equipped with electronic bugging devices and burglary tools at the headquarters for the Democratic National Convention. Two of the individuals were James McCord and G. Gordon Liddy, both members of the committee to re-elect the president. A third suspect was E. Howard Hunt, a former CIA agent and White House aide. ...
  • White House Nixon President Break
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    The Watergate Scandal and crisis that rocked the United States began on the early morning of June 17, 1972 with a small-scale burglary and it ended August 9, 1974 with the resignation of Republican President Richard Nixon. June 17, 1972, five burglars were discovered inside the Democratic National Headquarters in the Watergate office building in Washington DC. The burglars, who had been attempting to tap the headquarters' phone were linked to Nixon's Committee to Re-Elect the President (CREEP). ...
  • United States V Nixon
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    UNITED STATES V. NIXON (1974) Historical Context- President Richard M. Nixon was being charged of trying to cover up the Watergate incident. Watergate was and still is the headquarters for the Democratic Party. Some of Nixon s men broke into the complex and tried to wire tap the telephones. However, the bread in went bad. So, they went in the second time but this time they were caught by a security guard. They were taken to prison. The reason why the men wanted to wire tap the phone was so that...
  • Watergate White House
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    WATERGATE Watergate is the popular name for the political scandal and constitutional crisis that began with the arrest (June 17, 1972) of five burglars who broke into DEMOCRATIC National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office building in Washington, D. C. It ended with the resignation (Aug. 9, 1974) of President Richard M. NIXON. The burglars and two co-plotters-G. Gordon Liddy and E. Howard Hunt-were indicted (September 1972) on charges of burglary, conspiracy, and wiretapping. Four mo...
  • White House Nixon Watergate President
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    During the night of June 17, 1972, five burglars broke into the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate office complex in Washington, DC. Investigation into the break-in exposed a trail of abuses that led to the highest levels of the Nixon administration and ultimately to the President himself. President Nixon resigned from office under threat of impeachment on August 9, 1974. The break-in and the resignation form the boundaries of the events we know as the Watergate affair...
  • The Watergate Conspiracy Deep Throat
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    The Watergate scandal of the early 1970's was a scandal of such great proportion that it could have caused our capitalist government to collapse like the Roman Empire. Watergate left the American people feeling used by all politicians. Since their trust was violated, cynicism stayed with the American people for years afterward. It has been proven that Richard Nixon, the President of the United States, hired seven men to break into the Watergate hotel and bug the Democratic headquarters to find o...
  • Richard Nixon Book Policy Domestic
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    The author of In Search of Nixon, Bruce Mazlish, a professor of history, received his Ph. D. from Columbia University. Western intellectual and cultural history as well as science and technology are his areas of interest and expertise. He is also intrigued with the culture of capitalism and history of the sciences. He is an authority in the interdisciplinary field of psycho history as well as historical methodology. He has recently tried at an effort to conceptualize global history. He is a fel...
  • Watergate White House
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    Watergate affair, in U. S. history, series of scandals involving the administration of President Richard M. Nixon; more specifically, the burglarizing of the Democratic party national headquarters in the Watergate apartment complex in Washington, D. C. The Watergate affair signifies the web of political scandals that plagued President Richard Nixon from 1972 until his resignation in 1974. The beginning of the Watergate scandal began in June 1971, when the Pentagon Papers were published. In Sept...
  • The Watergate Affair White House
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    The Watergate affair was the most significant scandal in United States governmental history. Watergate is defined as a scandal involving abuse of power by public officials, violation of the public trust, and attempted obstruction of justice. The Watergate scandal is named after the building complex in Washington D. C. , which was the site of the illegal activities that took place in 1972. In this essay I will explain what Watergate was, a few of the key players (many too numerous to mention), an...
  • Watergate Scandal United States
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    The Watergate Scandal Jeremy Madsen American Perspectives Research Paper On June 17 th 1972 five men were arrested after breaking into the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate complex These five men were eventually linked to many high-ranking White House officials, members of the Committee to Re-elect the President and even to President Richard M. Nixon himself. To this day it has not been determined what these five men were doing in this office however the investigation...