• William Faulkner Literature Giant
    499 words
    William Cuthbert Faulkner was born on September 25, 1897, in New Albany, Mississippi, the first of four sons born to Murry and Maud Butler Faulkner. He was named after his great-grandfather, William Clark Faulkner, the "Old Colonel," who had been killed eight years earlier in a duel with his former business partner in the streets of Ripley, Mississippi. A lawyer, politician, planter, businessman, Civil War colonel, railroad financier, and finally a best-selling writer (of the novel The White Ros...
  • The University Of Oxford
    2,903 words
    The University of Oxford The University of Oxford in Oxford, England is a very old and distinguished institution. Oxford University has been in existence for around nine centuries (Brief 1). It is the oldest English speaking university in the world (History 1). There is no exact date when the University was established, but there is some evidence of teaching going on around 1096 (Kenny 2). There are said to be several different founders of the University, but there is no way to designate one ove...
  • Biography Of Stephen Hawking
    425 words
    Stephen William Hawking was born on 8 January 1942 (300 years after the death of Galileo) in Oxford, England. His parents' house was in north London, but during the second world war Oxford was considered a safer place to have babies. When he was eight, his family moved to St Albans, a town about 20 miles north of London. At eleven Stephen went to St Albans School, and then on to University College, Oxford, his father's old college. Stephen wanted to do Mathematics, although his father would have...
  • Shakespearean Authorship William Shakespeare
    1,833 words
    In 1564, a man was born by the name of William Shakespeare. He was born to a poor family, was given little education, and had no interaction with sophisticated society. Thirty-eight plays and over 150 sonnets are not attributed to this ignorant man. Those who believe that Shakespeare was the author have no definitive proof but instead point to Hamlet s declaration: The play s the thing (Satchell 71). The true author, however, lies hidden behind he name of Shakespeare. Edward de Vere the premier ...
  • Anglo Saxon Military Conquest Norman
    1,323 words
    October 14 th of the year 1066 two armies faced each other near the town of Hastings. 10, 000 Norman troops under the command of William of Normandy faced 8, 000 Anglo-Saxon soldiers led by Harold the current king of England. Geoffrey Parker, Cambridge Illustrated History of Warfare (Cambridge: 1995), pp. 82-3. Harold's 8, 000 men consisted of Housecarls, the local Fyrd, and local village volunteers. David Howarth, 1066: The Year of the Conquest (New York: 1977), pp. 170-1 The two armies clashe...
  • Online Reference Oxford Million Book
    795 words
    Online reference Book publishing is like farming: a lot happens in the spring, summer is pastoral, autumn is hectic and everyone gets drunk in winter. Just now, as Observer readers will know, the Anglo-American book trade is going through one of its seasonal spasms. Charles Frazier, bestselling author of Cold Mountain, has sold his new (unwritten) book to Random House for $5 million and all over Manhattan people who should know better are crying 'Foul!' As Mark Twain memorably put it, when peopl...
  • A Study In The True Authorship Of Shakespeare
    1,368 words
    ... first to identify the Earl of Oxford as the author of the works by William Shakespeare. From this book sparked a wildfire of debate surrounding the issue of authorship, creating passionate supporters on either side of the issue. "The Oxford ians," as de Vere's many supporters are known, have long ago established their own society and remain dedicate to the cause of proving his authorship. In 1975, the Encyclopedia Britannica (15 th edition) commented that, "Edward de Vere became in the 20 th...
  • Oscar Wilde Internet Source
    463 words
    Oscar Wilde was born in October 16 th in 1854 (Oscar Wilde pg 5). His father William Wilde was an eye and ear doctor he was said to have pioneered the industry (Internet source). He also wrote medical books on this subject some of which became textbooks until well after his death (internet source). He was a very well learned and well-spoken man who fit right into Dublin's high society. His mother, Lady Jane Francesca Wilde was a smart, witty, and sophisticated women who was the perfect counterpa...
  • Cited In Richardson Development 1994 Oates
    3,785 words
    CHILD DEVELOPMENT ED 209 BOOK 1: The Foundations of Child Development M A 02 Essay Option 2 Describe the processes by which genes and environment operate together to influence development. Discuss the significance of these processes for our understanding of child development. This essay will look firstly at the ideas that have prevailed throughout history, in relation to genes interacting with the environment, and the human developmental implications of this relationship. It will briefly outline...
  • George Orwell Oxford Companion Wadsworth
    809 words
    George Orwell Many writers use satire to attack areas of life they didn't agree with. Satire is a cunning way to express their opinions. Some of these works today are considered masterpieces and works of art. One writer who was a genius at incorporating beliefs in his writings was George Orwell. Commonly known by his pen name, George Orwell was an English novelist and social critic (Wadsworth 866). Orwell was born in Be gal, India and was later educated in Eton, England. He was the son of Richa...
  • Sonnets It Seems Improbable That Shakespeare Play Oxford Written
    812 words
    It is simply inconceivable that, in Elizabethan England, the actor son of a butcher would urge a powerful earl to marry and beget children for love of me. Shakespeare of Stratford was plainly not homosexual: he was married at eighteen and had fathered three children by the age of twenty-one. Moreover, the tone of this Sonnet is utterly different from the flattery and abject self-abasement found elsewhere in Shakespeare's dedications to Southampton. The Sonnets repeatedly demonstrate a familiarit...
  • Professor And The Madman
    420 words
    In The Professor and the Madman, the author, Simon Winchester, does an excellent job of paralleling the history of the making of the Oxford English Dictionary with a touching story of friendship between the dictionary editor, Professor Murray, and a notable contributor to the dictionary, Dr. Minor. Simon Winchester provides an interesting background as to how the Oxford English Dictionary, one of the worlds greatest books, came to existence. He includes a genealogy of the lives of the two main c...
  • Prime Minister Margaret Good Years
    496 words
    Margaret Hilda Thatcher's overwhelming sense of self-confidence and ambition ruled her life from the time she was a small child in Grantham, though her Oxford years and during her early years in politics. It led her to become the first female Prime Minister of Great Britain, and also helped through her difficult political years as "Attila the Hun." Britain's first female Prime Minister was born on October 13, 1925 in a small room over a grocer's shop in Grand ham, England. Margaret Hilda was the...
  • The Genius Of Shakespeare But Which One
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    Abstract What comprises genius is usually recognizable, if not always quantifiable. With Shakespeare, it is both recognizable and quantifiable. This paper will outline his known talent, but attempt to give a different picture of the man than is taught or widely known. While the Shakespeare that is traditionally taught is one dimensional, the lesser-known person was multi-faceted and once knowing his story, all of Shakespeare's works take on a richer hue. The Genius of Shakespeare Wil...
  • Shakespeare's Hamlet Mad Madness William
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    Alas he's mad' (3, 4, 106) How true is Gertrude's statement regarding her son's state of mind through out the In Shakespeare's, Hamlet, many people look at the play in different ways. Many portions of the play support his loss of control on actions, while other parts uphold his ability of dramatic art. The issue whether or not Hamlet is mad can be discussed in both ways. Throughout the play there are indications that support 'Hamlets madness' 1. While other evidence would suggest that his 'ma...
  • Matthew Arnold Anarchy 1869 In Which He Sets Forth Ideas
    618 words
    Although remembered now for his elegantly argued critical essays, Matthew Arnold (1822-1888) began his career as a poet, winning early recognition as a student at the Rugby School where his father, Thomas Arnold, had earned national acclaim as a strict and innovative headmaster. Arnold also studied at Balliol College, Oxford University. In 1844, after completing his undergraduate degree at Oxford, he returned to Rugby as a teacher of classics. After marrying in 1851, Arnold began work as a gover...
  • Stephen Hawking General Relativity
    606 words
    Stephen William Hawking Stephen William Hawking was born January 8, 1942 in Oxford, England and showed great talents in mathematics and physics at a very young age. In high school Hawking's mathematics teacher inspired him to specialize in mathematics but his father was against the idea and Hawking ended up specializing in chemistry during high school. He entered Oxford University in 1958 and had specialized in thermodynamics, relativity theory, and quantum mechanics. He was known for being lazy...
  • About Galway Kinnell Richard
    289 words
    Richard Gray Kinnell, Galway (1927-), was born in Providence, Rhode island, and studied at Princeton and the University of Rochester. He served in the United States Navy and then visited Paris on a Fulbright Fellowship. Returning to the United States, he worked for the Congress on Racial Equality and then travelled widely in the Middle East and Europe. He has taught at several colleges and universities, including California, Pittsburgh, and New York. The poems of his first volume, What a Kingdom...
  • About Stanley Kunitz Jay
    352 words
    Jay Paring Kunitz was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he grew up; he studied at Harvard College, receiving a BA in 1926 and an MA in 1927. He then moved to New York, taking a job with the H. W. Wilson company as an editor of the Wilson Library Bulletin; he also began at this time the work of collaboration with Howard Hay craft on four important biographical dictionaries of English and American authors. His first book of poems, Intellectual Things (1930) was barely recognized, and Kunitz...
  • American History Edward Oxford Against All Odds
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    All through history, man always seems to be at war. In some cases he is the attacker, in others the defender. In both cases, these wars are broken down into two basic elements, the battles that are fought and the individuals who fight them. In The Red Badge of Courage, Stephen Crane talks about conflict, courage, fear, cowardice, heroism, victory, and defeat. These elements make up the exploits of war we record in our history books. This paper will deal with war, more specifically, a special exp...