• Scottie Madeleine Judy Story
    561 words
    hitchcock Vertigo stars James Stewart as Scottie, a retired detective, and Kim Novak as Judy Barton, who gets disguised as Madeleine, a woman hired by Scottie's friend to act as his wife in order to frame Scottie. The story takes place in San Francisco in the 1950's. The film opens on a high building, where officer Scottie and his partner are in pursuit of a suspect. Scottie's partner's life is on the line and only he can save him. Unfortunately, he has vertigo, a fear of heights. Scottie is una...
  • Why Are The Chicago Bulls So Good
    489 words
    Why Are The Chicago Bulls So Good? Two weeks ago, I was home watching a Chicago Bulls game. I started to analyze why the team had the best record in the league. About nine years ago, the Chicago Bulls selected Michael Jordan in the third pick of the college draft from North Carolina. A few years later, the Bulls drafted Scottie Pippen from Central Arkansas State and just recently acquired Dennis Rodman from the San Antonio Spurs. After my diagnosis, I concluded that the Bulls have the three key ...
  • Vertigo Alfred Hitchcock John Ferguson
    726 words
    In the 1958 film, Vertigo, Alfred Hitchcock examines the vast intricacies of the dizzying ing effects of vertigo. Hitchcock examined the ailment in a physical, mental, and almost supernatural form. Some of the insights are easy to spot, but others are buried deep within the cognitive caverns of the scripting, acting, and production of the film. According to Doctor Robert Heating and Doctor Nora Frohberg of the University of Iowa, vertigo is A sense that the environment is spinning around or a se...
  • Vertigo 2 Scottie Madeleine Judy
    1,579 words
    Vertigo Alfred Hitchcock is one of the most well known directors of all time, bringing murder and mystery to a new light. His films, starting in 1925 with Pleasure Garden and ending in 1976 with the film Fantasy Plot, set a precedent for all other directors in the film industry. Hitchcock came to be known as the Master of Suspense. Many story lines and techniques within his cinematography are common standards for films today. His film The Lodger, is a film that came to be an ideal example of a ...
  • Vertigo False Image
    4,250 words
    In one of the countless reviews of Vertigo the inevitable subject of obsession was stated in the following manner: that film is not a study of obsession, but the obsession itself. In other words, the phenomenon of obsession is present in it not as an outside object of "investigation", but as the film's own intrinsic characteristic. Therefore, it does not investigate this phenomenon but "produces" it, i. e. instigates obsession. Such inversion, perhaps unusual and open to a variety of readings, g...
  • Vertigo Alfred Hitchcock
    1,073 words
    VERTIGO Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo is a thrilling film filled with mystery and suspense. However, Hitchcock left many unsolved issues at the end of this film. In contrast, when comparing Vertigo to more recent films of similar genre', mysteries are usually always solved and thoroughly explained by the end of the film. Ironically, Hitchcock's failure to explain everything to the audience in Vertigo is one of the film's best attributes. This lack of knowledge allows the viewer to use their own ima...
  • Vertigo Scottie Movie Conflict
    386 words
    Vertigo is probably one of the more intriguing movies that I ve seen in a while, and almost as thought provoking as what team will win the NCAA tourney. In my opinion, it is truly a tragedy just because of the number of people that perished due to falling from a high place. The main protagonist, Scottie who was the cause of all of these deaths goes through the most trauma in the movie. He first ends the life of the policeman, by accident but then ends up destroying the lives of two others. The l...
  • Voyeurism In Hitchcock Rear Window
    2,776 words
    Voyeurism: Hitchcock's Obsession When looking at two of Alfred Hitchcock's most critically acclaimed movies, Rear Window and Vertigo, it may be difficult to tell that they are similar in any way. But after further review, it becomes fairly evident that the two films share a strong common bond. Hitchcock uses voyeurism as a main theme in both of these masterpieces, and the voyeurism is connected in many surprising ways: it is evident in the careers of the male voyeurs, causes serious damage to th...