• No Work No Food
    396 words
    'No Work, No Food" 83 Hyakujo, the Chinese Zen master, used to labor with his pupils even at the age of eighty, trimming the gardens, cleaning the grounds, and pruning the trees. The pupils felt sorry to see the old teacher working so hard, but they knew he would not listen to their advice to stop, so they hid away his tools. That day the master did not eat. The next day he did not eat, nor the next. "He may be angry because we have hidden his tools," the pupils surmised. "We had better put the...
  • Clockwork Orange Technology Pirsig Phaedrus
    429 words
    To say technology is a function of history or vice versa, one runs immediately into a problem of endogenatity. Irrespective of time, technology pervades culture (even the most primitive) and it is difficult if not impossible to claim that one directly affects the other. From the discovery of fire to the advent of space travel, technology profoundly impresses the world around it, for better of worse. Most recently, society has chosen to fixate mostly on technology negative aspects, not because of...
  • Zen Native American
    333 words
    Gary Snyder spoke of the wide blue skies, the prairie, and the nearly forgotten buffalo. Few in this backstabbing artificial-Wall Street World can truly understand man's bond with nature. Man has stepped from the wilderness into a more dangerous place. A place lacking spirit. The only predators are unpredictable: other men. Long ago men lived in tribes. These tribes were based on collective thought, group interaction, and true cohesion. The environment and its dangers were the uniting bond. As ...
  • Walden And The Art Of Zen
    1,905 words
    If I were asked who my favourite Western Zen philosopher was, without any hesitation, I would declare it to be Henry David Thoreau. Although he knew in translation the religious writings of the Hindus, it may be unlikely that Henry David Thoreau ever studied the teachings of the Zen Masters. Even then, the insight within his own personal writings would irrefutably make him master of his own temple. The wisdom found within Thoreau's Walden can be clarified through Zen Buddhist beliefs and ideas a...
  • Zen And The Art Of Archery
    824 words
    The book Zen and the Art of Archery, by Eugen Herrigel, discusses the spirituality connected with the art form in the sport of archery. In this book, Herrigel describes many aspects of how archery is, in fact, not a sport, but an art form, and is very spiritual to those in the east. As an actor, this book helps you to use your spirituality in your acting. Archery, in this book, was the way that the author found his way into Zen Buddhism. He studied this art, which is referred to as the "artless ...
  • Japanese Gardens Garden Zen One
    2,473 words
    Japanese Gardens The role of gardens play a much more important role in Japan than here in the United States. This is due primarily to the fact the Japanese garden embodies native values, cultural beliefs and religious principles. Perhaps this is why there is no one prototype for the Japanese garden, just as there is no one native philosophy or aesthetic. In this way, similar to other forms of Japanese art, landscape design is constantly evolving due to exposure to outside influences, mainly Chi...
  • Zen Buddhism China People One
    1,994 words
    Ch " an and Zen Buddhism Throughout the early years in many East Asian countries, there were many people who were looking for answers to this world's, and otherworldly, questions. When Gotama became enlightened, and began preaching the practices of Buddhism, it came at such a time when the Han dynasty was collapsing, citizens were tired of Confucianism and looking for a new ideology that they could put there hearts and souls into. Over the years, Buddhism proved to be much more than just a relig...
  • Zen In The Art Of Archery
    260 words
    Zen In The Art Of Archery has got to be the most boring and draggy book I have ever read. Surprisingly, it is less than a hundred pages long because reading it, I felt like it was a thousand pages long! It is so wordy and complicated I could hardly understand what on earth Eugen Herrigel was writing about without my head throbbing endlessly. This slender book tells the story of Herrigel's efforts to learn about Zen, through the practice of archery, when he lived in Japan. In essence, he learns t...
  • Zen Buddhist And Japan
    1,858 words
    Zen Buddhism and Japan Japan and the development of Zen Buddhism went hand in hand towards the beginning of the sixth century. Buddhism was in full bloom in India and the Chinese were adapting it to there Lifestyle when several Japanese clans began picking it up. Zen Buddhism Zen Buddhism is a combination of Indian and Chinese thought process revolving around the world as it is and the discipline of finding enlightenment. The idea of enlightenment or Satori as the Japanese called it was the cent...
  • Muromachi Period Work Zen Ink
    1,746 words
    The Muromachi style of Zen Buddhism has influence art and design ever since it's beginning in the 14 th century. Although it was influenced by the Chinese styles at a parallel time, they both are still influential and noticed in today's world. For years Japanese Ink Painting continued to be consistent with a basis on nature, and simplicity. Was the beginning of Minimalism in Japan? Was it intentional? The open composition of space and content on paper is a key of today's design. The simplicity o...
  • Psychedelic Experience Buddhism Zen Psychedelics
    4,889 words
    THE INFLUENCE OF THE PSYCHEDELIC MOVEMENT ON THE RISE OF BUDDHISM IN THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCEbyJacob Curtis A study submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Asian Religions course Warren Wilson College 2003 In an attempt to synthesize my own personal academic area of interest, that is: the history of the psychedelic movement in twentieth century America, with the content of the Asian Religions course, I have elected to study the relationship between the influx of Buddhist phil...
  • An Essay On Chan
    836 words
    An Essay Answering Questions From the Assigned Text by Faure This essay will attempt to answer questions coming from the Bernard Faure text assigned in class. The questions are as follows: How does Hu Shih's approach to Chan differ from D. T. Suzuki's? Why was the scholarship of the Japanese on Zen not objective? What does Faure mean by the teleological fallacy? What does he mean by the two alternative approaches he suggests: structural analysis and hermeneutics? How does Hu Shih's approach to C...
  • Zen In The Art Of Archery
    871 words
    Zen in the Art of Archery, by Eugen Herrigel describes the ritualistic arts of discipline and focus that the Zen religion focuses around. In this book, Herrigel describes many aspects of how archery is, in fact, not a sport, but an art form, and is very spiritual to those in the east. The process he describes shows how he overcame his initial inhibitions and began to look toward new ways of seeing and understanding. In the beginning of the book Herrigel tells us that he is writing about a ritual...
  • Zen Mind Beginner's Mind
    1,715 words
    Philosophy Critical Book Review: Zen Mind, Beginner s Mind For my critical book review I chose to read, Zen Mind, Beginner s Mind, by Shunryu Suzuki. Suzuki was a direct spiritual descendant of the great thirteenth-century Zen master Do gen. Suzuki was already a deeply respected Zen master in Japan when he came to America in 1958 intending on a short visit. He was very impressed by the seriousness he found among Americans interested in Zen that he became a permanent resident in San Francisco. H...
  • Phil Jackson And Buddhism
    1,823 words
    Buddhism is a major Asian religion studied and practiced in countries such as Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia. Although Buddhism is a growing religion throughout the world, in particular, the practice of meditation is spreading in the West. The United States has a center for Buddhists in Hawaii and New York and also a Buddhist community has been established in California. (Hewitt, 13-14) But even closer to home for most is the practicing of Zen Buddhism on the basketball court by forme...
  • Zens Influence On The Art Of The Sword
    359 words
    Zen's Influence on the Art of the Sword Zen has long had a great influence upon Japanese culture. Many aspects of this culture are touched upon by Zen including art, literature, and specific ceremonies such as the one concerning tea. During the Kamakura period of Japan, another area of culture began to be affected by Zen; the martial arts of the samurai class. Somewhere along the line, the samurai realized the ease with which the monks of Zen Buddhism dealt with issues such as mortality and then...
  • Buddism Noble Truth
    359 words
    Buddism is of the world's fasting spreading religion. At this time there 313 million buddist in Asia. And aproximatly 500 thousand in North America. Buddism is the is not just a religion, but a way of life. It is a religion that helps the people that beleive in it to, search the deepest recuses of there souls to find what the true way to peace is. Buddhism was founded by a wealthy prince, Siddhartha Gautam, of the Sakya clan. After many years of practicing Hinduism. At the age of 29 Gautam left...
  • Law Of Gravity Zen One God
    3,218 words
    The Nature of Beings and Their Not Being The western way of living and more generally, the way westerners think and behave, in the twentieth century appears to have little or no connection to the east and eastern philosophies, but in fact America has been more influenced in these factors by the east than almost any other region. A society s way of life is governed, to an extent, by the current theories and philosophies of that time period, and so to analyze a society s outlook, an analysis of th...
  • A Look At Zen
    342 words
    FINAL PAPER LBR L STUDIES 272 MARK FERGUSON The study of Zen, it seems, became a main preoccupation of the Japanese, something never seen elsewhere. Embracing it with gusto, allowing it to mingle with old tales and myths, the Japanese raised Buddhism to a new height. Students of the ways of Buddhism found they could, if diligent, attain a measure of spiritual freedom or self-fulfillment, which may well be lacking in other forms of thinking, certainly in religions. Though I doubt very seriously t...