• Trans Continental Railroad Northern Pacific
    1,883 words
    If any act symbolized the taming of the Northwest frontier, it was the driving of the final spike to complete the nations first transcontinental railroad. 1 The first railroad west of the Mississippi River was opened on December 23, 1852. Five miles long, the track ran from St. Louis to Cheltenham, Missouri. Twenty-five years prior, there were no railroads in the United States; twenty-five years later, railroads joined the east and west coasts from New York to San Francisco. 2 No other single f...
  • Building The First Transcontinental Rail
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    BUILDING THE FIRST TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILROAD From the time when locomotives first set their immense wheels onto the frigid iron of parallel rails, Americans longed for a means of transportation which would connect the separate regions of California and the Eastern states. This need for connection, fueled by manifest destiny led to the building of the first transcontinental railroad. Expansion of the railroads would have been postponed indefinitely without the unfair support the government provid...
  • The Underground Railroad Freedom Accounts Author
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    Rachel Wood History 6 3 October 2000 Book Review- The Underground Railroad: Dramatic Firsthand Accounts of Daring Escapes to Freedom Author: Charles L. Blockson Knowing very few details concerning the Underground Railroad I felt compelled to read The Underground Railroad. Blinded by the misconceptions of many history books that my teachers reinforced through their lectures, I was determined to find out the "entire truth" of my ancestor's rigorous route to freedom. What I recall from my high scho...
  • The Transcontinental Railroad Pacific Union Mobilier
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    On May 10, 1869, one of the most important achievements in the history of transportation was born. In Promontory, Utah, the completion of the transcontinental railroad marked the beginning of a new era in moving the nation. Two rival railroad companies, Union Pacific and Central Pacific, with the help of the government, worked together and completed the famous route in just less than seven years. The development of the transcontinental railroad that connected the United States significantly supp...
  • Quakers And The Underground Rr
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    The Beginning of the Underground Railroad During the years prior to the Civil War, many people in the United States greatly opposed slavery. Far from being passive victims waiting to be rescued, enslaved blacks never ceased in their struggle for freedom. From the moment Africans were captured in the interior and coastlands of West Africa, to the time they were sold as slaves in the Caribbean and the new colonies of North America, black slaves acted as aggressively as possible to maintain their o...
  • The Transcontinental Railroad Companies Chinese Pacific
    1,235 words
    Blake Higgins 4/29/00 Vail Mountain School Grade 8 The Transcontinental Railroad Although many changes occurred in the mid 1800's in America, such as the Industrial Revolution and the Civil War, the Transcontinental Railroad profoundly changed the U. S. This tremendous project, partly funded by Congress, was one of the key factors that encouraged foreign immigration to America. The Transcontinental Railroad certainly instilled a sense of overwhelming pride in this nation, and it paved the way fo...
  • Railroads Early Rail
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    Railroads have been around for almost two hundred years. Between 1820 and 1850 the first railroads began to appear and the need for the further development became apparent. America had just gone through an era of canal making; and now with the canals not in total operation, railroads began to thrive and take jobs that would once have gone to the canals. However, it was not easy for the railroad industry to promote their innovative new mode of transportation. With vision and ingenuity, the pione...
  • Railroad United States
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    This essay will be discussing briefly about the transcontinental railroad construction during 1865-1900. During the 19 th century railroads had become the nation's most important transportation source. The railroad helped the United States to improve its economic system. When air brakes were invented, it transported more travelers and goods than before. People or goods could travel anywhere in the United States without walking or riding a horse which took several days. The United States wanted t...
  • The Transcontinental Railroads Pacific Railroad
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    The Transcontinental Railroads The Transcontinental Railroad consisted of ten major railroads that together would span the distance between the East and West Coasts of the United States. The completion of these railroads brought change, both for good and bad, and had an enormous impact on the United States and other countries of the world. Without a doubt, each railroad played an important role in shaping America into the country it is today. The Great Northern Railroad was an 8, 316-mile long r...
  • Discovery Of Gold In American West
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    The discovery of gold in California sparked a massive emigration across the continent to the Pacific coast by Americans searching for wealth. This massive migration of people brought Jefferson's dream of a continental American empire to reality, and began to establish the United States as the dominant country in North America. This massive migration also prompted the need to bridge the nation for the purpose of making the trip from one coast to another easier. This resulting need to bridge the n...
  • The Transcontinental Railroad And Westward Expansion
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    The Transcontinental Railroad and Westward Expansion Thesis: The transcontinental railroad greatly increased Westward expansion in the United States of America during the latter half of the nineteenth century. The history of the United States has been influenced by England in many ways. In the second half of the 1800's, the railroad, which was invented in England, had a major effect on Western expansion in the United States.' Railroads were born in England, a country with dense populations, shor...
  • Indians West Cattle Railroad
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    a. Why were the Indians treated so unjustly (12) The American settlers greed was the basis for the injustice forced upon the Indians. At first the Americans simply wanted the land that could be used to grow or create products. Then the Indians were viewed as hostile enemies. This was unfair because the Americans were too greedy to give the Indians the supplies they were promised; therefore, the Indians attacked. The Indians also attacked because the Americans put them on reservations so the sett...
  • The Underground Railroad Slaves Slavery Slave
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    The Underground Railroad One of the most shameful periods in history was the institution of slavery in the nineteenth century 2. Slavery was a divided issue in the 1800's. Most slaves brought to America were known as low class people who could bring no good, but history fails to state that many of the slaves who came were people of many trades, ambitions, as well as determinations. The Underground Railroad had its earliest beginnings with runaway slaves fleeing from the Southern United States in...
  • Underground Railroad Slaves Freedom Par
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    Introduction The Underground Railroad, the pathway to freedom which led a numerous amount of African Americans to escape beginning as early as the 1700's, it still remains a mystery to many as to exactly when it started and why. (Carrasco). The Underground Railroad is known by many as one of the earliest parts of the antislavery movement. Although the system was neither underground nor a railroad, it was a huge success that will never be forgotten. I chose to research the Underground Railroad be...
  • Underground Railroad Slaves People Owners
    719 words
    The Underground Railroad wasn't really underground nor a railroad but, routes that the enslaved took to get to freedom. It was also nicknamed Liberty Line. Escape routes ranged from the North to the Western territories, Mexico, and even the Caribbean. Although no one really knows exactly when it was started, some reports of aid being given to the runaways in the early 1700's and ended promptly in 1856 due to the union's victory over the Confederacy. There were many people involved in these escap...
  • Sherman Anti Trust Act
    477 words
    What was the Sherman Anti-Trust Act? How was it used during the Presidency of Roosevelt? During the 19 th century the emergence of what we now call the "economy" was born. Prior to 1840 there were really no such thing as "big business." The first real "big business" was the Railroad. The building of the Railroad Empire and rail lines throughout the United States drastically changed the American way of life. Due to new abilities to travel long distances and communicate at a much faster pace than ...
  • The Underground Railroad Runaways Freedom Escape
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    The Underground Railroad was any organized movement activity, designed to assist runaway slaves. "A secret method of conducting Negro slaves" (Gara 3). The railroad reached its peak in the period 1830-1865. It was known by every route the enslaved took, or attempted to take to freedom. Neither "underground" nor a "railroad, it consisted of paths and roads, through swamps and over mountains, along and across rivers and even sea. These networks of escape could not be documented even with precisio...
  • Underground Railroad Slaves Free People
    681 words
    The Underground Railroad There are probably many people who wonder about the Underground Railroad or how slaves could travel on trains and ships without being discovered. Well, for those who may not know, the Underground Railroad was a secret network organized by people who helped men, women, and children escape from slavery to freedom. It existed before the Civil War ended slavery in the Unites States. The Underground Railroad gave hiding places, food, and transportation for the people who were...
  • American Dream The Octopus
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    The Octopus is a stunning novel of the waning days of the frontier West. To the tough-minded and self-reliant farmers, the monopolistic, land-grabbing railroad represented everything they despised: consolidation, organization, conformity. But Norris idealizes no one in this epic depiction of the volatile situation, for the farmers themselves ruthlessly exploited the land, and in their hunger for larger holdings they resorted to the same tactics used by the railroad: subversion, coercion, and out...
  • Andrew Carnegie Steel Railroad Company
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    Carnegie, Andrew (1835-1919), American industrialist and philanthropist, who, at the age of 33, when he had an annual income of $50, 000, said, Beyond this never earn, make no effort to increase fortune, but spend the surplus each year for benevolent purposes. Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland. He went to the U. S. in 1848 and soon began work as a bobbin boy in a cotton mill in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, for $1. 20 per week. The following year he became a messenger in a Pittsburgh telegr...