• Innocence In The Way The Piper's Songs
    2,633 words
    Perfectly Poetic T.S. Eliot once said of Blake's writings, "The Songs ofInnocence and the Songs of Experience, and the poems fromthe Rossetti manuscripts, are the poems of a man with a profound interest in human emotions, and a profound knowledge of them". (Grant, Pg 507) These two famous bookof poetry written by William Blake, not only show men " 's emotions and feelings, but explain within themselves, thechild's innocence, and man's experience. A little over two centuries ago, William Blake in...
  • Corresponding Poem In Songs Of Innocence
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    Introduction (Innocence) Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: "Pipe a song about a lamb!" So I piped with merry chear. "Piper, pipe that song again"; So I piped, he wept to hear. "Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy chear:" So I sung the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. "Piper, sit thee down and write In a book, that all may read". So he vanish'd from my sight, And I pluck'd a hollow reed,...
  • Blake's Songs Of Innocence
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    William Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience is a unique collection of poetry in which the poet looks at similar events or situations from the viewpoints of both the innocent (I) and experienced (E) individual. Through these poems, Blake examines how a person's experiences shape the way he / she sees the world and reacts to various situations. These contrasting states are reflected in The Chimney Sweeper (I and E), and the Nurse's Song (I and E). In order to attempt to understand what Bl...
  • Blake's Songs Of Innocence And Experience
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    In this first essay, I will be dealing with poems from William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience. More precisely, I shall be dealing with the Introduction from Songs of Innocence, as well as its counterparts Introduction from Songs of Experience and Earth's Answer. For my thesis, I shall attempt to demonstrate how Blake used the symbols of the Piper and the Bard to represent the states of innocence and of experience, and how he passes from one state to the next through the use of these s...
  • Dual Existence Of Innocence And Experience
    460 words
    INNOCENCE vs. EXPERIENCE It is believed that the world exists in two fashions, innocence and experience. Neither can exist without its opposite. Innocence is where humans begin, and they must pass through experience on their way to heaven. One figure from turn-of-the-century literature are prime examples of innocence lost which characterize this idea. Maggie, author Stephen Crane's main character in Maggie: A Girl of the Streets is a soul whose story shows the trauma of the loss of innocence thr...
  • Holden's Innocence
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    It is a fact of life that no one can remain young forever. Some teenagers cannot wait to grow up and get out on their own away from childish rules and parental limitations. For other teenagers the thought of the adult world conjures images of negativity and responsibilities such as going to work everyday, dealing with undesirable people, and being part of a stiff society. However, mediums do exist between these two contrasting worlds. Unfortunately, Holden Caulfield, an adolescent struggling wit...
  • Twain's Use Of Innocence
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    The American Webster's dictionary defines innocence as, "Freedom from harmfulness; inoffensiveness". Although this definition is the one which is most commonly used, many authors tend to twist or stretch the meaning in order to fit the material to which it applies. For example, the way J. D Salinger applies innocence to his work is quite different from the way Mark Twain uses innocence. Innocence also changes accordingly with the time period. The definition of innocence is dynamic with respect t...
  • Shakespeare S Symbol Of Ultimate Innocence
    464 words
    In Shakespeare^s play A Midsummer Night^s Dream, one of the main reoccurring themes is love. Shakespeare writes of love that is passionate and impulsive, or sensible and reasonable. In Act three, Bottom, a crude commoner states on opinion of love. "And Yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together now-a-days; the more pity, that some honest neighbors will not make them friends". (Act, Scene i, line 136) However, in many ways, reason and love are already much more closely li...
  • Idea Of Childhood's Innocence Through Naivete
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    In Seamus Heaney's "Blackberry-Picking" the use of vivid diction, juicy imagery, infantile rhythm, and simple form conveys to the reader the deeper meaning of life's own mortality and childhood's innocence through the literal description of a memorable adolescent experience. The poems simple form engulfs the reader into an almost reminiscent conversation with an adult reflecting on a childhood experience. This simple form gives the poem the simplicity and care-freeness that of which a child woul...
  • Songs Of Innocence And Songs Of Experience
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    The poetry of William Blake is renowned for its critique of society and injustice as well as expressing strong religious influences. Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience were written concerning the destiny of the human spirit and the differences between how children and adults view and understand the world. Blake believed that man had the potential to attain both wisdom through experience and joy through innocence. He admired the innocence of children and thought that self-awareness could ...
  • Blake's Poems Of Innocence And Experience
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    Innocence & Experience in Blake's Poetry William Blake focused on biblical images in the majority of his poetry and prose. Much of his well-known work comes from the two compilations Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience. The poems in these compilations reflect Blake's metamorphosis in thought as he grew from innocent to experienced. An example of this metamorphosis is the two poems The Divine Image and A Divine Image. The former preceded the latter by one year. Blake's poems of innocence a...
  • Joyce's Araby The Boys Loss Of Innocence
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    Loss Of Innocence In James Joyce's Araby the boys loss of innocence may be confusing and even painful but at the same time it is important. It begins his journey into adulthood. The boy in Araby is experiencing something all young men experience, the first crush. It is a time in his life where he is having new feelings, and trying to express those feelings to the object of his affection is next to impossible. Even the simple act of watching Mangan's sister brings up emotions in the boy. To say t...
  • Five Poems From The Songs Of Innocence
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    William Blake wrote many poems during his lifetime. He had a set of poems called The Songs of Innocence and also a set called The songs of Experience. This paper is focusing on five poems from the Songs of Innocence, which are: "The Shepherd,"The Echoing Green", The Little Black Boy,"The Blossom", and "Laughing Song."The Shepherd" is a very short two stanza poem in which Blake tells about a shepherd who stays with his flock morning and night praising them. The second stanza consists of the sheph...
  • Poem Exudes Innocence And First Time Love
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    A first date, a tender touch, a gentle kiss, can all be described as expressions of affection. Innocence often has to do with the fondness and adoration displayed in relationships. The movie, Love Actually, starring Hugh Grant, focuses on different ways of making love work by showing the lives of different people. The film, from time to time, shows a little boy who is falling in love with a girl in his school. He thinks that the best way to win her heart is to become a rock star and so he joins ...
  • Esteban Lust For The Innocence And Passion
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    House of Spirits My Analysis of a Yearning Man When watching a movie one feels as if they were a fly on the wall throughout one characters life, but in the movie "House of Spirits", there is more that one wall to stay on. First there is a character, Clara, who is innocent and pure. She is a character like no other I have seen. A character who falls in love with one who is almost her complete opposite. Esteban is a man who has worked hard in order the win the hand of a beautiful woman but who is ...
  • Little Black Boy From Songs Of Innocence
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    Children in Blake's Poetry The use of children is a prominent theme in a number of William Blake's poems. It is apparent in reading such poems as, "The Lamb,"The Little Black Boy", and "The Chimney Sweeper", that Blake sees the world through the eyes of a child and embraces the innocence of the young. Blake's poem "The Lamb", from Songs of Innocence really illustrates the innocence and purity of a young child. The persona in the poem is of a young child. The child questions the lamb as to where ...
  • Loss Of One's Innocence
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    Innocence is usually associated with youth and ignorance. The loss of one's innocence is associated with the evils of the world. However, the term "innocence" can be interpreted in a variety of ways. Similarly, the loss of one's innocence can be interpreted in more than one way, and, depending on the interpretation, it may happen numerous times. The loss of innocence is culture specific and involves something that society holds sacrosanct. It is also bounded by different religious beliefs. Still...
  • Joys And Desires Of Childhood Innocence
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    The speaker of the poem tells of his visit to the Garden of Love and of the chapel that is now where he used to play as a child. Instead of welcoming him in, the chapel has 'Thou shalt not' of the Ten Commandments written over the door. The speaker sees that this negative morality has destroyed the garden as well, transforming the 'sweet flowers' to graves and tombstones. The emotionless ritual of the priests 'walking their rounds' threatens to choke out the speaker's life itself. The secret to ...
  • Blake's Songs Of Innocence
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    Franklin Garcia Professor Castillo English 1302.013 November 4, 2002 Blake's cry for a voice William Blake had a vision. It was a thought that changed the way poetry and writing would be viewed from here to eternity. Blake's point of views and associations with the characters represents a change in the way the reader dictates who the victim is really and who is not. In Blake's "The Chimney Sweeper" from the Songs of Innocence and Experience, both aspects of heaven and hell can be examined just t...
  • Song Of Innocence
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    'The Chimney Sweeper' By William Blake Poem Analysis Unlike the one in Songs of Innocence, 'The Chimney Sweeper', in Songs of Experience is very dark and pessimistic. This poem also seems to be very judgmental and gives motives for everything, but unlike Song of Innocence, the sweeper in this poem does not free himself from his misery. In the first two lines, Blake gives us an image of an anguished child in a state of agony or even in a state of corruption. The color black seems to be very impor...
  • Book About Innocence
    465 words
    The Catcher in the Rye is a book by J.D. Salinger and the story of a boy named Holden Caufield. He is no longer innocent, but exposed to the world. Phoebe, Holden's sister, is the opposite she is quite the innocent, never really being exposed to the world outside her protective bubble. Holden wants to protect such precious innocence only found in the children as a guardian of the innocent a catcher in the rye. The Catcher in the Rye is fundamentally a book about innocence. This book shows people...
  • Lamb's Godlike Quality And Innocence
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    A time lost in it's own morals, seeks refuge in the knowledge and innocence of the past. William Blake used direct dictation through his poem, "THE LAMB", in disseminating his theorem, which we, humans, seek to find peace within our selves only after reestablishing our identity with something pure. In the poem William Blake uses the Lamb, as a vessel, to interpret the innocence, we would seek to use. The speaker is seeking answers to his questions, about how the lamb gained such natural innocenc...
  • Innocence At The Beginning Before The Boys
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    In Lord of the Flies, William Golding presents pessimistic view of society. He uses the story of a group of boys stranded on a deserted island to examine a multitude of specific social issues, such as leadership, sadism, and the role of intellectuals in society. Taken together, this presentation of opinions on social issues brings the reader to the question of the nature of society. As to this question, Golding asserts that society is an inherently corruptive influence and illustrates this throu...
  • Theme Of The Loss Of Innocence
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    The loss of innocence in life is an inevitable process. Losing one's innocence comes merely by growing up. The philosophy of the loss of one's innocence is a definite theme in the book Bless Me, Ultima. This theme is displayed throughout the entire story and plot of the novel. There is loss of innocence all around the main character, Tony, with his brothers and the people he meets. Tony also loses a great deal of his own innocence to the harsh realities of the world which marks his transition fr...
  • Theme Of Eternal Innocence And Beauty
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    Ode on a Grecian Urn John Keats portrays the theme of eternal innocence and the sufficiency of beauty throughout this poem. The Grecian urn, passed down through countless centuries to the time of the speaker's viewing of it, exists outside of time in the human sense - it does not age, it does not die, and it is alien to all such concepts. In the speaker's meditation, this creates an intriguing paradox for the human figures carved into the side of the urn: they are free from time, but they are si...
  • Holden's Innocence
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    In The Catcher in The Rye, by J. D, the main character, Holden, can be seen as a troubled teenager growing up in a less than perfect society. Throughout the novel Holden struggles with the fact that many young and innocent kids will grow up and see the world from a different perspective. He naturally becomes worried for all future generations who will one day grow, as he did, and loose their innocence. The fixation of youth and innocence can be seen in the title of the book, as well as throughou...
  • Holy Thursday From The Songs Of Innocence
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    Life The progression from innocence to experience to "higher innocence" is an essential part of life that William Blake discusses through his poems. In the state of innocence of the human soul, the whole world is perceived as good. Because God is good and He creates all, everything is accepted without question. Then in the state of experience, all is bad and dominated by evil. The morality of God is doubted. Through experience, everything is questioned instead of just being accepted as the ultim...
  • Age Of Innocence
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    It's New York City in the 1870's, a society ruled by expectations and propriety, where a hint of immorality can bring scandal and ruin. This is an America every bit as Victorian as her contemporary England. Into this world arrives Countess Ellen Olen ska (Michelle Pfeiffer), a woman who has spent much of her life in Europe and is now escaping from a disastrous marriage. Her initial adult meeting with Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) is sedate - he is engaged to her cousin May (Winona Ryder) - b...
  • Loss Of David's Innocence
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    MONTANA 1948 ESSAY QUESTION Montana 1948 is about the loss of innocence and the painful gain of wisdom. Discuss. In Montana, the summer of 1948 held a series of tragic events which were to have a permanent and decisive impact on David and his parents. This chain of events were to turn David's young life and that of his family upside down forever and which was to so angrily lead him out of childhood, destroying his innocence and youthful naivety in the process. However, David's shocking revelatio...
  • Childs Loss Of Innocence
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    The short story written by David Michael Kaplan, Doe Season is what I have chosen to analyze. Doe Season is about a young, innocent girl, named Andy who goes hunting with her father, his friend Charlie Spr eun and his 11 year-old son Mac. At the beginning of the story she is praying that they will get a deer. Throughout the story, the narrator tells of Andys past experiences, like when she saw the ocean for the first time and was frightened. The narrator also mentions actual experiences she has ...
  • Songs Of Innocence With Songs Of Experience
    871 words
    Blake Poetry Verily I say unto you, Whose over shall not receive the kingdom of God asa little child shall in no wise enter therein. [S Luke, 18 (17) ] The words are those of Jesus, who was neither unaware of reality, nor indifferent to suffering. The childlike innocence referred to above isa state of purity and not of ignorance. Such is the vision of Blake inh is childlike Songs of Innocence. It would be foolish to suppose thatthe author of ^Holy Thursday^ and ^The Chimney Sweeper^ in Songs ofI...
  • State Of Innocence
    794 words
    Children embody the very essence of innocence. They see the world through virgin eyes, hear life with fresh ears and create the world with a simple mind and pure heart. It is about the only time in a person's life when the weight of sin, corruption, egotism, and hatred are not blurring their vision and thoughts. It is the only time a person is completely free. But this state of innocence becomes separated and exiled once experience has tainted the soul. William Blake conveys this theory in his w...
  • Children's Loss Of Freedom Innocence
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    Analysis of the poem: Genesis, by Bruce Dawe Bruce Dawe, an Australian poet, has written the poem 'Genesis'. The poem compares the beginning of school to Adam and Eve's expulsion from the Garden of Eden, hence the title 'Genesis'. Dawe has put the context of the poem into a modern day theme. Using the comparison of Adam and Eve's loss of innocence, he describes how the innocence of children is lost at school. This correspondence to the story of God expelling Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden ...
  • Guiltiness And Innocence Of Socrates
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    One of the most famous philosophers of all times, Socrates, was put to trial in Athens around 347 BCE in behalf of three major counts. First of all he was indicted for corrupting the youth of Athens. Secondly, he was indicted for not believing in the gods in whom the city of Athens believed in; thirdly he was charged for believing in other new divinities which were not traditional to the city. In this paper, I will assess the guiltiness and innocence of Socrates as portrayed on two major works, ...
  • Catcher In The Rye Innocence
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    J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye Compared to Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn All famous American authors have written novels using a variety of characters, plots, and settings to illustrate important themes. Throughout literary history many of the same themes have been stressed in different novels. In J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye and Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, each author writes about the common theme of coming of age. The two novels were written more than half a ...
  • Embodiment Of Eloise's Innocence
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    Essay: Innocence Lost The world of childhood is protected from many of the problems of the world. The adult world is mentally, physically, and socially an adjustment that can be very difficult for some people. There is sometimes a reluctance to accept adulthood. In "A Perfect Day for Bananafish", as well as "Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut", J.D. Salinger focuses not only on the loss of innocence with youth, but also on events that have changed his characters forever. Ironically, it is often the ch...
  • Stories End After The Loss Of Innocence
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    Smiling children clap their hands at all of the happiness in this great big world. Without a care, their imaginations run wild. They lose themselves in colorful stories and delight in life's little things. As time goes by, however, stories end, little things become littler as people grow bigger, and innocence slowly breaks apart and disappears. The smiling child without her innocence is no longer whole, and her world will never be the same. We have known the sound of her two small, carefree hand...
  • Holden Believes In Innocence
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    John Smith Holden Caulfield, the main character in J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, is very complex, mentally and emotionally. The readers of the novel would not be able to understand Holden as much as they do, if it was not for Holdens deceased younger brother Allie. Although Allie is never actually met in the novel, Holdens discussions about him and his conversations with him help us understand Holden better. It may seem strange that a dead character would shed so much light on a living...
  • Catcher In The Rye Innocence Theme
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    There is a time in a person's existence when they loose their innocence. No longer are they sheltered from the harsh outside world, they are a part of it. They are now corrupt. A process that engulfs all and is only stopped by death. These are the thoughts of Holden Caulfield right before he has a mental breakdown. Holden adores innocence and how only the young are subject to it. In Holden's mind there are three people in particular Holden knows who are the epitome of innocence. These people are...
  • Atticus Audience The Innocence Of Tom Robinson
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    For any speech to be successful, it must persuade its audience. To attain this goal, the speech has to first get the attention of the audience and at all times, maintain those audiences interest. In Harper Lees To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch, in his speech to the jury uses conflicting ideas to arouse and keep the interest of the jurors. By doing so, Atticus tries to sway his audience toward his ultimate intention, proving beyond a reasonable doubt that Tom Robinson is not guilty of attacki...