• Good Example Of Strong National Identity
    763 words
    Throughout Canada's relatively short existence we have created quite a reputation for ourselves. Our great nation is known for many things, and I am proud to say that most are positive. Does Canada have a strong national identity? Anyone can see the answer is yes. Just take a look at the facts. For example, we are renowned for our peacekeepers and no other country is considered more peaceful. Without a doubt this is the type of identity we should work to keep. The first thing we should examine i...
  • Popular Music And National Identity In Brazil
    808 words
    Vianna, Her mano. The Mystery of Samba: Popular Music and National Identity in Brazil. (1999). In "The Mystery of Samba", Vianna discusses samba in a different light than other authors have. He explains that although samba has become a symbol of their culture and something they are proud of, that it was not always that way. The author is not interested in where samba originated or about the history of its players, he says "I am thinking of samba's transformation into a 'national rhythm", when it...
  • National Identity And Penetration Of Their People
    352 words
    The country of Iraq has just had its first election. They are now on their way to forming a stable and democratic nation. As of now they are struggling with some of the aspects that form a nation. The country of Iraq is struggling with two of the elements in particular; gathering a national identity and penetration of their people. The Shiites control most of the population and infiltrate them with their ideas. However, the Kurds and the rest of the Sunni Arabs have their own ideas on government...
  • National Identity Of America
    1,143 words
    The Search For National Identity Nationalism is the attitude members of a nation have when they care about their national identity. Nationalism can also be the love of a country and the willingness to make sacrifices for it. Just as a person's identity is affected by other people and the events in their life, a nation is affected the same way. There have been many people and events that have affected the national identity of America. There were two Awakenings that spread different aspects of Ame...
  • India's Struggle Towards Unity And National Identity
    1,391 words
    What doesn t kill you makes you stronger The creation of a national identity in India has been hindered by at least these three internal and external factors. First, British influence and rule have contributed to India's incongruity since long before Benjamin Disraeli officially proclaimed Queen Victoria empress of India in 1876. The alien British government was merely concerned with profits, not the greater well being of the Indian nation-state. Secondly, even if Indian identity were to be disc...
  • Aspects Of The Australian National Identity
    651 words
    The Call Of The Bush The poem I have chosen is titled "The Call of The Bush" that is written by Dora Wilcox. The subject / story of this poem is about the poet / writer being in the outback without anything but the horizon in front of her. The main emotions expressed in this poem are happiness, relaxation and peace. The poet has used the following poetic devises to create a clear picture in the mind of the reader. These help to convey the message and include: lines one and two rhyme, lines three...
  • American National Identity And American National Interest
    3,132 words
    C 3 C Mark R. McDowell Throughout early American history there was a direct correlation between national interest and national identity, but with the changes of the 20th century regarding America's status in the world came changes regarding America's nature. American national identity has shifted away from alignment with the creed and vision of the Founding Fathers while American national interest has strived to continually act in accordance with that creed and vision. This shift is most evident...
  • Cloning Of A Non Human Species
    1,419 words
    This question shakes us all to our very souls. For humans to consider the cloning of one another, forces everyone of us to question the very concepts of right and wrong that makes us all human. The cloning of any species, whether they be human or non-human, is ethically and morally wrong. Scientists and ethicist's alike have debated the dangerous implications of human and non-human cloning extensively since 1997 when scientists at the Roslin Institute in Scotland produced a cloned sheep, named D...
  • Integral Part Of Lampman's Poetry
    3,826 words
    The Beginnings of a National Literary Tradition Canadians throughout their history have been concerned over the status of their national literature. One of the major problems facing early Canadian writers was that the language and poetic conventions that they had inherited from the Old World were inadequate for the new scenery and conditions in which they now found themselves. Writers such as Susanna Moodie, Samuel Hearne, and Oliver Goldsmith were what I would consider 'Immigrant' authors. Even...
  • Collaborators Within The Polish Government
    1,930 words
    In no other country than ancient Israel have Jews lived consistently and for as many centuries in as large number, and with as much autonomy as in Poland. The late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries brought huge waves of Jewish settlers into Poland, and by the beginning of the Second World War in 1939 there were approximately 3.5 million Jews living throughout the Polish countryside. The Jewish people within Poland lived in a self-contained world, with a unique network of religious, social and ...
  • Concept Of A National Id Card System
    1,420 words
    The concept of a national ID card has been debated in the United States for over three decades. In the past, the opposition as well as its allies has been strong. As a result of the September 11th terrorist attacks there has been new interest in the concept of national ID cards. While this idea is not all a new, it is closer to becoming more of a reality than ever, gaining the approval by the key members of congress. Currently the Bush Administration objects this renewed idea, however due to the...
  • Same Race Adoption For Black Children
    1,344 words
    Color Blind Ronald Jackson, a one-year-old African American boy, is anxiously waiting to be adopted. Unfortunately, there seems to be an insufficient number of couples of his race willing to adopt. There are two alternatives, he could either remain in the child welfare system or a suitable Caucasian couple could adopt him. It is evident that transracial adoption makes up 3.9 percent of all adoptions. Although permitting whites to adopt might be a reasonable solution, is troubling to the American...
  • Negativity On Kuwait's Human Rights Record
    2,224 words
    Human Rights: Yet another commodity for the new society or a necessity? As one stands on the doorsteps of a new millennium, one can only imagine the future ahead. With the globalization movement making its way around the world, issues such as human rights are coming up, and are becoming international issues of concern rather than local ones. International organizations monitor governments and note the extent to which those governments adhere to and respect human rights. In the age of globalizati...
  • Languages And Regional Cultures Of Population Groups
    498 words
    Some definitions of culture emphasize its basis in meaning. All human activity involves meaning, and this is what distinguishes it from the activity of non-human animal species. Culture, then, arises exclusively from human activity and excludes other species. Meaning presupposes language; in other words language, which is a unique characteristic of humans, at the same time characterizes culture. Culture as Norms and Values A more restricted definition of culture defines it as the values held by ...
  • Irrevocable Conversion Rates Of The Participating Currencies
    952 words
    On January 1, 1999, eleven European countries replaced their national currencies and introduced a single European currency, the Euro. As of then, the Euro is considered to be the official currency in the eleven participating countries. Bills and coins of the national currencies will remain in circulation as sub-denominations of the Euro until January 1, 2002, when they will be exchanged against new Euro coins and bills. However, all inter-bank commerce and stock exchange trade is now denominated...
  • Emergence Of Belarus Nationalism
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    The Eastern European country chosen for discussion is Belarus. This paper will first discuss the transition from communism based on the experience of living under communist rule. Second, the significant historical factors from 1920-1991 that led to the fall of communism will be given and traced as to how they affected the process of the transition. Finally, the choices made by Belarus during and after the transition period will be traced back to historical and transitional factors that influence...
  • American Neo Nazi Movement
    978 words
    The American Neo -Nazi movement started in the streets in the middle 1980's, in the U.S. The movement is an act to keep alive the beliefs and actions of Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Regime. Believers and activist in the movement are known as Skinhead, or 'Skins. ' Some are dresses like a lot like the original British movement, which was started by some rough looking teenagers in combat boots hanging out on the streets. The average Skinhead, wears combat boots or Doc Martens, thin red suspenders, an...
  • How Racism Came To Ireland
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    The Congo boys of Cardiff Sugar and Slate by Charlotte Williams 192 pp, Planet Encounters: How Racism Came to Ireland by Bill Rolston and Michael Shannon 108 pp, Beyond the Pale Publications In the mid-19th century William Hughes left Llangollen Baptist College in Wales and headed for the Congo to civilised, evangelism and proselytize in the name of Christian ministry and Caucasian might. He returned not long after with sickness in his body and two young men in tow. In the years to come, N'kansa...
  • Film Presents Willard As An Ambiguous Character
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    The subject position in a film is with whom the audience member most closely identifies with throughout the film. The subject position is created both by the filmmaker and by the audience that views the film. In many films about the American intervention in Southeast Asia, the films create a spectator position that initially is different from American national identity but by the end of the movie the subject position usually comes in line with the views widely held by Americans. Examples of thes...
  • 1906 All India Muslim League
    2,226 words
    The Partition of India'A moment comes, which comes but rarely in history, when we step out from the old to the new, when an age ends, and when the soul of a nation, long suppressed, finds utterance. ' -Jawarhalal Nehru 14 August, 1947, saw the birth of the new Islamic Republic of Pakistan. At midnight the next day India won its freedom from colonial rule, ending nearly 350 years of British presence in India. During the struggle for freedom, Gandhi had written an appeal 'To Every Briton' to free ...
  • Bismarck's Successful Domestic Policy From 1871 To 1890
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    'Inept and Unsuccessful'. How Valid is this Comment on Bismarck's handling of Domestic Policy from 1871-90 From her formal unification at Versailles in 1871, Bismarck, the first German Chancellor, took control of his new German State. Yet twenty years later, the 'Bismarckian era' in German history had ended, culminating in Bismarck's departure. With unification complete at least geographically, by 1871, Bismarck's next challenge lay with domestic policy and the running of the new German constitu...
  • Achievement Of Nationalism In Germany
    608 words
    GERMANY The leadership of the movement toward nationalism occurs under William I (Wilhelm) and Otto von Bismarck. His chief minister Prince Otto von Bismarck dominated Wilhelm reign and Bismarck agreed to rule with Wilhelm to form a union in Germany. The steps that Wilhelm takes to achieve a national identity are to reform the Prussian army, which is a creation of the Napoleonic Wars based on a law of 1814. He had an Army Reform Bill presented to the parliament (Landtag), which actually voted th...
  • Mexico The Northern Border States
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    1. Introduction The line in the middle of the U.S. -Mexico border region is defined in the east by the Rio Grande, known as the R o Bravo in Mexico and in the west by the notorious wire strung. Nothing much marks it as the most dramatic international border on earth from San Diego-Tijuana to Brownsville-Matamoros. (Illustrate. 1) Here, people live on each side, without feeling especially divided. Here the contrast between poor and rich is omnipresent but on the same time seen as normal. The dese...
  • Novel
    1,024 words
    After World War II, somewhere in the 1960's and certainly by the 1970's, writers began to produce novels that resembled former novels but that broke the historical comparison or the communal memory of the traditional novel. Such novels contain plots and characters that are deeply infused with a particular national identity-national identity is their point, so to speak; yet such novels, rather than being limited to the national readership that shares this identity, are translated almost immediate...
  • Individual Learns Its Culture From Its Environment
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    Encounters between people of different cultural backgrounds have existed forever. People have always thought bout things that were unusual in other cultures. But, those encounters were relatively slim in early days today, they are almost part of everyday life, At the same time, the interchange between cultures has jeopardized their very existence, and the emergence of a diverse culture, a fixation often referred to as globalization... Primarily, what makes cultures different from each other is i...
  • Nationalism And The Welsh Language
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    How accurate is Gwyn A. Williams assessment of Welsh identity in the eighteen century when he states that they were A people who, apart from their language, lacked practically every attribute of a nation except for the perverse and persistent belief that they were one Certainly, at the beginning of the eighteenth century, Wales was facing a crisis of identity. This crisis was a long time in the making. The Norman invasion had given the Welsh a common enemy, breaking down the regional and communi...
  • Communication And Culture
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    Outline I. It is important to reflect ones own national and cultural identity to understand what is different among people of different nations. History teaches us that culture always changes because of internal or external influences, even our own cultures and values change over time. Our world today is a world in which people from different nations and cultures are getting closer and closer because of economical and political reasons. Because cultures are becoming closer, communication is the ...
  • Powell's Boy Scouts
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    Future War Or Public Health-To Address Which Of These Needs Were The British Boys Scouts First Created Future war or public health - To address which of these needs were the British Boys Scouts first created This essay discusses the historical context of the British Boy Scouts from 1908 to 1918. The essay looks at what inspired and influenced Baden-Powell the founder of the Boy Scouts to create the movement. Including his personal social and emotional needs combined with Edwardian ideals, patrio...
  • Canadians Social And National Identities
    672 words
    When the topic of Canada comes up among peoples, immediately the thought of ice hockey, the Mounted Police, and beavers comes to mind. In fact, Canada has truly lost its true identity that we once knew. It is slowly being assimilated and in fact Americanized in aspects of social identity, national identity, and cultural identity. First, Canada is being slowly Americanized in its social identity. When we talk about a country's social identity, we examine a few areas. First is the media, which is ...
  • One Area Of Canada
    621 words
    How do others see Canadians, do Canadians have a unique national identity Although the United States (US) has some influence on most countries, Canadian life revolves around the US, and sometimes, how much we hate Americans. Most countries cannot say that they are made up of two separate nations (English and French), Canada, on the other hand, can say this. Another thing about Canada is its unique geography, the fact that it shares the longest border with the US, and Canada has the longest coast...
  • Relationship Between Evangelicalism And The Middle Class
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    The City of Today Glorious, glorious England. As the Empire spreads some say "so does its glory"; others mumble of the price which we pay for our greatness. Many of us Londoners have read, if not discussed, the intriguing debate transpiring between Sir Andrew Ure and Sir James Phillips Kay. Are the cities of great England truly representative of the jewels in Her Majesty's Crown Or are they the stain of exploitation and abuse that some have proclaimed Sir James Phillips Kay, an M.D. at Edinburgh...
  • Racial Duality Of Contemporary White Identity
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    When W.E.B. Du Bois announced in his marvelous work Souls of Black Folk, that the "problem of the 20th Century is the color line... ". immediately he set out a social and analytical paradigm that instantly recognized that the major racial problem in America was that existing between Blacks and Whites. Nevertheless, we are still, at the end of the 20th Century, struggling with the question of what kind of democratic society we are, or whether we will be a democratic society at all, often obliviou...
  • Multi National Corporations In The World
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    David Korten's 'When Corporations Rule The World' The book 'When corporations Rule the World' by David Korten describes the way things will be in the future with multi-national corporations. These large corporations are found all over the world. There are many different problems that are appearing and many of them can be seen to be connected to corporations. We need to look at what is occurring with corporations and see if they are causing more problems or are helping to solve problems of the wo...
  • National Center On Child Abuse And Neglect
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    l, emotional (verbal), and sexual (incest) abuse. Inappropriate parents behavior is usually, most often the case. Sometimes child abuse may be linked under a more broader term, maltreatment or neglect. Child abuse has a profound impact on families, victims (children), the abuser, and for future generations to come. For instance, Jenifer is a thirteen year old and she has a very nice, wealthy, and happy family. Her best friend Tina is occasionally physically abused by her father. Sometimes Tina c...
  • Whole Idea Of Communism
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    Communism in Relation to the Invisible Man Communism is a social system characterized by the absence of classes and by ownership of the means of production and subsistence, political, economic, and social doctrine aiming at the establishment of such a society. Communism is an attempt to control or limit society by making everybody equal, no person is more important than the whole, and every person has a designated role in society. American communism is basically the same concept. The American Co...
  • Culture's Impact On A Country's Economic Development
    3,323 words
    Introduction: The role of culture in the economic development of countries is often overlooked by economists, yet it can significantly affect a country's economic development. Culture generates assets, such as skills, products, expression, and insight that contribute to the social and economic well being of the community. I will show the benefit of culture's impact on economic development through tourism, social capital, and corporate governance. In contrast, culture can produce negative outcome...
  • Multicultural Education Benefits All Students
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    The Debate Over Multicultural Education in America America has long been called "The Melting Pot" due to the fact that it is made up of a varied mix of races, cultures, and ethnicities. As more and more immigrants come to America searching for a better life, the population naturally becomes more diverse. This has, in turn, spun a great debate over multiculturalism. Some of the issues under fire are who is benefiting from the education, and how to present the material in a way so as to offend the...
  • Nation State In Conclusion Scotland
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    Abstract The concept of a nation state has only emerged over the last couple of centuries, before this point less advanced and coherent states managed the affairs of the populous. The nation state is the overlapping of two separate features. The nation is the identity that individuals relate to within the society. This can exist on its own, as all that is needed is a person to feel that they have a connection with others on no more than shared belonging. The state is used to take national feelin...
  • Tibet's Relationship With China
    2,329 words
    Grasping for the Shadow of Identity There once lived a peaceful, ancient culture, isolated from civilization, living in peace and harmony with its surroundings, grounded in deep faith springing from its religious leader, blooming like a rose in the majestic hills. In what seemed like only minutes, this nation I speak of suddenly became a communist, occupied country, with no identity of its own, with an outlawed flag and an exiled leader. This nation is Tibet. After more than 2,000 years of freed...
  • Development Of Arafat As A Terrorist
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    The Development and Defining of Arafat: A Terrorist Personality Because a rather large number of individuals fall into the category of terrorist, classifying them as a single personality type is an impossibility. The definition of a terrorist is ambiguous enough to include individuals ranging from the Abu Nidal to the Baader-Meinhoff group. By definition, terrorists do not accept societal standards of what is right and what is wrong. They are not confined to what other individuals, nations, and ...