• Darwin's Theories Throughout The Generations
    4,053 words
    Darwin and the Victorian era The Victorian Age was a time when many views on human existence and destiny were formed and discussed. Strictly speaking the Victorian era denotes the reign of Queen Victoria from 1837-1901. When this era came to an end, the ongoing concepts and controversies did not vanish. The old and the new are always confusingly interlocked in culture. The twentieth century inherited some of the ideas of the nineteenth century. Some of these new ideas culminated elaborate philos...
  • Theories Smith
    547 words
    Adam Smith The British philosopher and economist Adam Smith was born in kirkcaldy, Scotland. He was educated at the universities of Glasgow and Oxford. In 1751 he became a professor at Glasgow. There he wrote The Theory of Moral Sentiment in 1759. This philosophical work gained Smith an appointment in 1764 as tutor of the young duke of Buccleuch. The tutoring took Smith to France, where he started writing The Wealth of Nations in 1776. It was the first complete work on political economy. The boo...
  • Hegemonic Theories And Political Economy Theories
    365 words
    In "The Virtual Community", Chapter Ten: Disinformocracy, Howard Rheingold states in the very first sentence of chapter ten that virtual communities could help citizens revitalize democracy, or they could be luring us into an attractively packaged substitute for democratic discourse. Focusing on journalism and the public sphere, I'm going to apply theories used in our text book, and compare them with Rheingold's ideas. These theories include the hegemonic and political economy theories, democrat...
  • Smith's Theories
    593 words
    How can John Maynard Keynes version of capitalism be compared to Adam Smith's Both are considered to be the molders and theorizer's of the economic era. They are both very different in thinking, one complex the other basic, in there specific time history. John Maynard Keynes has had much of the worlds economic theories based on his beliefs in his most important work The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money. During the Great Depression, Keynes, to secure a stable economy, promoted th...
  • Comparison Of Theories 3 Understanding Personality
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    Comparison of Theories 2 Abstract This paper is a comparison of three different viewpoints on the subject of personality. Carl Jung, B.F. Skinner, and Carl Rogers all had very different outlooks on what defined someones personality. As an added feature I have included myself as a theorist because my views are also different from the previous mentioned theorists. This paper will also look briefly into the background of each theorist because their views on life began in their childhood. Amazingly ...
  • Their Theories Of An Old Earth
    2,587 words
    Creation vs. Evolution While the theory of evolution is very commonly accepted amongst most scholars and intellectuals, when the scientific facts used to 'support' it are closely examined, it becomes apparent that it is merely that: a theory. Inaccurate information, misguided philosophers, and in some cases, just plain ignorance, have all contributed to this 'scientific religion' that does nothing but lead people away from the true nature of our existence, the Genesis creation. The creation 'sto...
  • Looking At The Theories Of Deviance
    1,115 words
    Aaron McBride Sociology 10811/15/1998 Explaining Teen Prostitution Using Sociological Theories of Deviance Deviance is defined as the behavior or acts that defy the norms of a society. For many years, scientists have researched on the various forms of deviance in the hope of developing theories that explain why some people act the way they do. The two case studies presented here both involve prostitution among the young people of society. One is entitled Enjo Kosai. It involves Japanese high sch...
  • Copernicus's Heliocentric Theories Of Planetary Motion
    1,539 words
    Aristotle vs. Copernicus Aristotle was a Greek philosopher and scientist, who shared with Plato the distinction of being the most famous of ancient philosophers. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, the son of a physician to the royal court. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy. He remained there for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 bc, Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias (d. 3...
  • Two Prevalent Psychological Theories For Pd
    2,188 words
    How Have Psychological Theories Elucidated the Nature of Anxiety: With Particular Reference to Panic Disorder Everybody has had experience with anxiety. Indeed anxiety responses have been found in all species right down to the sea slug (Rapee, et al 1998). The concept of anxiety was for a long time bound up with the work of Sigmund Freud where it was more commonly known as neurosis. Freud's concept of neuroses consisted of a number of conditions characterised by irrational and disproportionate f...
  • Philosophers And Ethical Theories
    1,948 words
    Existentialist Themes of Anxiety and Absurdity In a world with such a vast amount of people their exists virtually every different belief, thought, and ideology. This means that for every argument and every disagreement that their exists two sides of relative equal strength. It is through these disagreements that arguments are formed. Arguments are the building blocks in which philosophers use to analyze situations and determine theories of life. For the purpose of this paper I will try and argu...
  • Mill And Kant's Ethical Theories
    3,369 words
    Compare Mill and Kant's ethical theories; which makes a better societal order John Stuart Mill (1808-73) believed in an ethical theory known as utilitarianism. There are many formulation of this theory. One such is, "Everyone should act in such a way to bring the largest possibly balance of good over evil for everyone involved". However, good is a relative term. What is good Utilitarians disagreed on this subject. Mill made a distinction between happiness and sheer sensual pleasure. He defines h...
  • Theories Cognition Development
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    Barbara Mason Human Growth and Development Anne Brooks Lesson 2: Theories Cognition Development: Piaget's Theory Insight on Piaget: Jean Piaget was born in Neuchatel (Switzerland) on august [August] 9, 1896. At age eleven, while he was a pupil at Neuchatel Latin High School, Piaget wrote a short notice on an albino sparrow. This short paper is generally considered as the start of a brilliant scientific career made of over sixty books and several hundred articles. After Piaget graduated from high...
  • Theories Concerning Leadership And Leadership Styles
    3,616 words
    LEADERSHIP and MOTIVATION A) LEADERSHIP Under the topic Leadership and Motivation we will, first, build on the theoretical analyses of leadership and the development of this theory. Secondly, we will be observing the development of the motivation theory. Leadership is not an issue which has become apparent to us in the recent past. Perhaps it is an issue which has been highly regarded in public eyes in every stage of history. The first person Adam was a leader of his time, Moses, Jesus, Cesar an...
  • Cornerstone To Rodya And Nietzsche's Theories
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    Friedrich Nietzsche once said, "Dostoevsky, the only one who has taught me anything about psychology". The two writers share many similarities and differences. Dostoevsky clearly had an effect on the thinking of Nietzsche. The two would be considered both philosophers and psychologists. Both writers became prominent in the late 19th century in Germany and Russia respectively. Dostoevsky was noted for his Russian literary classics and would be responsible for a flowering of late 19th century Russ...
  • Freud's Theories On Sexuality
    1,709 words
    The Life & Works of Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) Introduction Sigmund Freud; Probably the most influential activist in the realm of the study of the mind, Psychology; An influence so great that his works, ideologies and theories alike have imposed themselves upon the minds of many in this, the twentieth century, regardless of our acceptance or futile resistance. He was responsible for the articulation of theories and concepts of which everyday individuals do not even know he is the originator of. I...
  • Weber's Theories On Social Rank
    589 words
    Social stratification is the ranking of members of society in a way that some of its members are regarded as superior and others as inferior. This theory is certainly debated in present time and was debated as far back as 1776 when Karl Marx presented his theory in his "Manifesto of the Communist Party". In the 1880's, Max Weber combatted that document in his own "Class, Status and Party". Karl Marx believed that social standing or rank was based solely on class position. For example, an owner o...
  • Theories Of Race And Racism
    1,121 words
    Du Bois vs. Cox Everyone has a different technique of evaluating the concept of race. The question that I wanted to ask is how these writers are using their experiences to development their own opinion. How did this concept of race develop into the immense issue we are facing now? According to Oliver C. Cox, the origin of race relations starts with ideas of ethnocentrism, intolerance, and racism. W.E.B. Du Bois said that if what want to find the truth out about race we need to look at the histor...
  • Iago's Theories On Othello
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    What Is Shakespeare's Achievement In Act I Of Othello Shakespeare's own personal aim was not to write a social and political reflection of his era, as many contemporary readers believe, it was; purely and simply, to entertain his audience. This does not mean that there can be no social and political reflections within Othello, it means that the reflections are there, not for the sake of social and political commentary, but for the sake of entertainment and pleasure. Aristotle explained in Poetic...
  • Marx's Theories
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    One of the first and most persuasive advocates of modern capitalism was Adam Smith. The most serious challenge to Adam Smith and his followers came from Karl Marx, a nineteenth century German. The son of a Prussian lawyer, the methodical Marx was a worthy and resourceful opponent. He unfolded his economic theories in his monumental Das Kapital, a work on which he spent eighteen years of research and writing. Marx's main objection to the capitalistic system was that it was unfair to workers. To s...
  • Aristotles And Ptolemys Theories
    710 words
    Galileo was an Italian mathematician, astronomer, and physicist. He was born in Pisa, Italy on February 15, 1564. In the mid 1570's, he and his family moved to Florence and he started his formal education in a local monastery. He was sent to the University of Pisa in 1581. While there, he studied medicine and the philosophy of Aristotle until 1585. During these years at the university, he realized that he never really had any interest in medicine but that he had a talent for math. It was in 1585...
  • Psychologist And Their Own Theories
    1,568 words
    Based on the past information and the information I acquired during the duration of this course I chose to do my evaluation on Erik Erikson using the classical psychoanalysis of Sigmund Freud and Carl Rogers using the non-Freudian / interpersonal approach from Adler and Jung. Since there is no way to tell if either theory is right or wrong it is imperative that we discover our own theory among the popular ones and derive our own method of practice based on our current knowledge. This is done by ...
  • Motivational Theories Workers Need
    1,060 words
    Leadership and Motivation 1. Introduction and Definition 2. Leadership Types a. Natural born leader b. Developed leader 3. Leadership Models a. Traditional b. Non-traditional 4. Leadership Traits a. Make people feel important b. Promote your vision c. Treat others as you want to be treated d. Take responsibility for your actions 5. Motivational Theories a. Classical Theory and Scientific Management b. Behavior theory. Contemporary Motivational Theories INTRODUCTION Effective leadership is the pr...
  • Theories Of Organization And Management
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    ORGANIZATIONAL DESIGN (THE RIGHT WAY) A Paper Presented in Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements of [OD-501 Organization and Group Dynamics] December 2002 Abstract A research of organizational theories to develop a usable, verifiable approach for creating and maintaining the right design for any company. Companies seem to not be prepared or poised, to deal with the challenges of a dynamic and constantly changing business environment. Theories of organizational design were examined, a good desi...
  • Instinctive Theories Of Aggression
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    Aggression: Theories and Theoretical Solutions I began my research on the topic of violent crime prevention. After reading about different crime programs, it became obvious to me that many of these programs conflicted in their deterrence philosophy. Many of the crime programs were based on a different theory of violence causation. It seemed more important for me to understand why violence exists before learning the methods of preventing crime. I looked up the definition of violence in several so...
  • Summary Economic Theories
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    Introduction The word economics is derived from "oikonomikos", which means skilled in household management. Although the word is very old, the discipline of economics as we understand it today is a relatively recent development. Modern economic thought emerged in the 17th and 18th centuries as the western world began its transformation from an agrarian to an industrial society. Despite the enormous differences between then and now, the economic problems with which society struggles remain the sa...
  • Scientific Theories And Laws
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    ... re to get a specific result. In that case, there may be a psychological tendency to find 'something wrong', such as systematic effects, with data which do not support the scientist's expectations, while data which do agree with those expectations may not be checked as carefully. The lesson is that all data must be handled in the same way. Another common mistake arises from the failure to estimate quantitatively systematic errors (and all errors). There are many examples of discoveries which ...
  • Lind's Theories From The Female Offender
    798 words
    Traditionally, there has been little research on or interest in the impact of female crime in modern society. In addition, juvenile crime rates are on the rise, which combine for a void of research or information on female juvenile offenders. In general, crime rates for women offenders have risen since the 1990's. Increasing numbers of young women are also offending at higher rates. In a 1996 U.S. Department of Justice Report, the number of arrests of young women had doubled between 1989 and 199...
  • Three Ethical Theories By Aristotle
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    Ethics " What are we like, and what should we do?" As humans we are faced with many decisions in life, which in and of itself, distinguishes us from the animal kingdom. I'm sure other animals make decisions, but as humans we take into account our values and morals. In choosing which path to take with some of life's decisions, ethics, are often at the center; heavily influencing our choices between what is right and what is wrong. Which are usually defined by society, as to what is acceptable and...
  • Formation Of Darwinos Theories
    532 words
    When Charles Darwin released his findings on Natural Selection in 1858, he did not do so in a vacuum. Many factors contributed to the formulation of his theories, and many popular misconceptions contradicted his conclusions to the point that he was reluctant to publish them for sixteen years. Despite widely held opposing doctrine, the intellectual environment of the day was already receptive for DarwinOs ideas. Although considered radical at the time, these ideas can be seen in retrospect as an ...
  • Hick's Theories On The Existence Of God
    1,840 words
    Throughout time there have always been some philosophers who present theories, which have philosophical themes in religious thinking that, are in connection to current social and political ideas. Thinkers like St. Anselm, St. Thomas Aquinas, and John Hick all express their views and feelings on the existence of God, as well as the human race. Their theories are based off asking questions like why are we here and how do we prove God's existence? Is there really life after death and where does the...
  • Neural Network Model Theories
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    Theories of Knowledge and Psychological Applications Robin A. Finlayson University of Saskatchewan Ed. Psy: 855.3: Advanced Educational Psychology October 16, 1996 How individuals are able to obtain knowledge is something that psychologists have studied for a number of years. The ability to store and retrieve knowledge provides individuals with the propensity to form logical thought, express emotions and internalize the world around them. In order for a psychologist to understand the theories of...
  • He Exist Many Theories
    782 words
    Does He Exist Many theories exist to explain the ongoing debate on the existence of God. Whether or not we have a belief on this subject is irrelevant. We are here today and we got here somehow. People embrace different versions of the birth of our existence. I would like to share my version and what I think about the rest of them: People grow up in different environments, families, and circumstances. Our culture nurtures beliefs and traditions from all of these factors. As a result of these fac...
  • Locke's Theories On Property And Government
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    Mathew Jelonkiewicz Answered Question #2 Locke's Ideas on Property John Locke was considered one of the first modern liberal thinkers of our times. His ideas and theories permeate throughout many of the democratic world's constitutions. He authored many essays during his lifetime but one of the more famous ones was the Second Treatise on Government, attributed to him only after passing. This writing is concerned with individual man coming together into a political society and outlines the type o...
  • McKenna Espouses His Theories On Psychedelic Mushrooms
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    The Trip: Journey to The Center of Terence McKenna's Inner Self. Terence McKenna has become one of the most (in) famous figures in the exploration of psychedelia and its impact on society and technology. Here McKenna espouses his theories on psychedelic mushrooms, virtual reality, shamanism and evolution. This is definitely one of the strangest and most interesting articles I have ever read. At first it seems almost totally incomprehensible and inconceivable, but after reading it over a couple o...
  • Galileo's Theories
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    Galileo Galilei was an astronomer and mathematician, he was, a man ahead of his time. Galileo discovered the law of uniformly accelerated motion towards the Earth, the parabolic path of projectiles, and the law that all bodies have weight. Among his other accomplishments was the improvement of the refracting telescope in 1610 and his advocacy of the Copernican theory which brought him into a conflict of ideas and truths between himself and the Inquisition. He was condemned by the church whose th...
  • Fra Lippo Lippi's Aesthetic Theories
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    THE BODY AND SOUL OF FRA LIPPO LIPPI Robert Browning's 19th-century poem entitled "Fra Lippo Lippi" centers thematically around the discussion of art. Fra Lippo Lippi is a 15th-century monk and artist whom engages in a dramatic monologue with the law. As an unreliable narrator, he reveals things about himself and those around him that perhaps he is unaware of revealing. Fra Lippo Lippi expects that his behavior is seen as wrong but dismisses it with his poetic narrative of how life has tried to ...
  • Darwin's Theories
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    Charles Darwin was born on February 12, 1809 in Shrewsbury England at about the same hour as Abraham Lincoln. He was born to a successful family, his father was a doctor and his grandfather was a famous biologist. Darwin was not a great student and he decided to become a clergy so he transferred to Cambridge University. Instead of becoming clearly Darwin decided to study geology. After school Darwin became naturalist on board the royal navy ship the Beagle. The Beagle left England on December 27...
  • Father Of Modern Theories Of Evolution
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    The Theories of Evolution and Creationism Jacques Favreau 12-13-99 Global Studies Period 8 1550 words Jacques Favreau 12-13-1999 Period 8 The Theories of Creationism and Evolution Part I Creationism: the belief that life was created by a god. Creationism is the belief that all life and matter on this planet was created by a god or supreme being. It states that a god is the creator of all, and that he (or she) created everything out of nothing. This is a strong belief of many, and seriously contr...
  • Einstein's Theories
    549 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was born in Germany on March 14, 1879. As a kid he had trouble learning to speak. His parents thought that he might be mentally retarded. Hew as not smart in school. He suffered under the learning methods that they used in the schools of Germany at that time so he was never able to finish his studies. In 1894 his father's business had failed and the family moved to Milan, Italy. Einstein who had grown interested in science, went to Zurich, Switzerland, to enter a ...
  • Truth Of Scientific Theories
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    Does science consist in the progressive development of objective truth? Contrast the views of Kuhn with one other writer on this topic. The philosopher and historian of science Thomas Kuhn introduced the term paradigm as a key part of what he called "normal science": In normal (that is non revolutionary) periods in a science, there is a consensus across the relevant scientific community about the theoretical and methodological rules to be followed. (Marshall 1998). Paradigms tend to shift over t...