In early American government there were two emerging political views that were blatantly obvious in the new states; federalists and anti-federalists. In this paper two main topics of interest for each of the parties will be discussed, the role that government should have according to the differing views and the subject of foreign policy. The role of government as a according to the Federalists They support a stronger federal government. They felt that people can't govern themselves and that a nation must have a way to get rid of debts. Federalists also believed that only a strong central government can ensure states participation in general good.

Therefore representation is distributed more equally a single executive can govern better than multiple executives. They felt federal government provides common defense, raises revenue in time of war, and deals with other nations more effectively than a confederation. Federalists were respectable and embraced the cultured and propertied groups. They lived in settled areas along the seaboard, not in the raw back country. They were in outlook rather closely akin to the conservative Loyalist group of Revolutionary days.

But by remaining Loyalists it assisted them in the ratification. Federalists strongly supported the Constitution. Anti-federalists were alarmed by the absence of a bill of rights. Federalists assured them it would be added by amendment. Federalists believed that the three branches of government-legislative, judicial and executive- effectively represent the people. Anti-federalists, on the other hand, opposed the stronger federal government.

The felt states had rights, which the central government threatened to trample. In their eyes the constitution is a tyrannical document without a Bill of Rights. The constitution granted too much power over taxation to the Federal government. The anti-federalists has strong opinions when it came to the branches on the federal government. Congress should not have the power to meddle in the commerce of the states. The federal legislature is designed as an aristocratic institution, determined to steal the political prerogative of the people.

The Anti-federalists consisted primarily, though not only, of the states' rights devotees, the back-country dwellers, the one-horse farmers, the work-soiled artisans, the ill educated and illiterate-in general the poorer classes. They were worried that a potent central government would force them to pay off all their debts. They did not want to do this. Anti-federalists suspected that the conniving upper crust were pulling off a sinister plot against the lowly common folk. They argued that the Constitution had been drawn up by the aristocratic elements and hence was antidemocratic. They charged that the sovereignty of the states was being submerged and that the individuals freedoms were at risk by the absence of a bill of rights.

The Anti-federalists decried the dropping of annual elections for congressional representatives, the erecting of a federal stronghold ten miles square, the creation of a standing army, the omission of any reference to God, and the procedure of ratifying with only 2/3 of the states. Anti-federalists believed that the sovereignty of the people resided in a single branch of government-the legislature. Federalist Party position on Foreign policy was quite distinct. They took an aggressive attitude toward France, including undeclared naval war. The justification was that France was being excessively arrogant in American dealings, especially XYZ Affair. Also, France's government had changed so radically that America no longer thought its treaties were valid.

They were semi-aggressive towards Britain. The British violated Neutrality Act and seized cargo; also took sailors. British still possessed forts in America. Jay's Treaty settled with British. Spain signed Pinckney's Treaty, were impressed by America and desired friendship and alliance. They tried to help with Indian problems in Florida.

The overall justification for the federalists's tance on foreign policy was that America was a rapidly developing nation and had to prove itself on a world platform. The main backers of the party were wealthy and well known, and thus would be able to weather conflicts with foreign countries. Federalist Party position's had a great impact on the nation. Washington and Adams were first two Presidents and also Federalists (although Washington to somewhat lesser extent); thus their actions were those of the Federalist Party and also the first major actions of the nation in foreign affairs. The anti-federalists positions held that they wanted to settle with French and British, due to America's lack of a strong military. The justification: America wasn't a world power, and thus it was a poor idea to provoke Britain and France.

Also, war would have an extremely negative effect on the farmers and merchants that made up the party. Democratic-Republican position's impact on nation was distinct as well. Constituencies of party were employed in the tasks of most of the nation (farming, mercantilism, etc.) Thus, the interests of the majority of the citizens seemed to be with the Democratic-Republicans. Federalist vs. Anti-federalists On the topics of: Roles of Government and Foreign Policy by: Lauren Taylor, Phil Hamilton, and Sarah Love AP US History (2nd hour) Ms. FuentezWork Cited web of government. The federalists 1) They support a stronger federal government. a. people can't govern themselves. nation must have a way to get rid of debts. c. only strong central gov. can ensure states participate in general good. d.

Representation is distributed more equally. a single executive can govern better than multiple executives. f. Federal government provides common defense, raises revenue in time of war, and deals with other nations more effectively than a confederation. 2) Federalists were respectable and embraced the cultured and propertied groups. 3) They lived in settled areas along the seaboard, not in the raw back country. 4) Remaining Loyalists assisted in the ratification. 5) Federalists strongly supported the Constitution.

6) Federalists believed that the three branches of government-legislative, judicial and executive- effectively represent the people. B. The Antifederalists 1) They opposed the stronger federal government. a. States have rights which the central government threatens to trample. b. the constitution is a tyrannical document without a Bill of Rights. c. The executive branch is a thinly veiled monarchy. d. The constitution grants too much power over taxation to the Fed. gov. e. Congress should not have the power to meddle in the commerce of the states. f. The federal legislature is designed as an aristocratical institution, determined to steal the political prerogative of the people.

2) The Antifederalists consisted primarily, though not only, of the states' rights devotees, the dwellers, the one-horse farmers, the work-soiled artisans, the ill educated and illiterate-in general the poorer classes. 3) Joining these people were the Papermoneyites and debtors. 4) Antifederalists suspected that the conniving upper crust were pulling off a sinister plot against the lowly common folk. 5) They argued that the Constitution had been drawn up by the aristocratic elements and hence was antidemocratic. 6) They charged that the sovereignty of the states was being submerged and that the individuals freedoms were at risk by the absence of a bill of rights. 7) The Antifederalists decried the dropping of annual elections for congressional representatives, the erecting of a federal stronghold ten miles square, the creation of a standing army, the omission of any reference to God, and the procedure of ratifying with only 2/3 of the states 8) Antifederalists believed that the sovereignty of the people resided in a single branch of government-the legislature. web affairs I. Federalist Party position A. Aggressive attitude toward France, including undeclared naval war.

Justification: France was being excessively arrogant in American dealings, especially XYZ Affair. Also, France's government had changed so radically that America no longer thought its treaties were valid. B. Semi-aggressive towards British. British violated Neutrality Act and seized cargo; also took sailors. Jay's Treaty settled with British. C. Spain signed Pinckney's Treaty, were impressed by America & desired friendship. Tried to help with Indian problems in Florida. D. Overall justification: America was a rapidly-developing nation and had to prove itself on a world platform. II.

Federalist Party position's impact on nation A. Washington and Adams were first two Presidents & also Federalists (although Washington to somewhat lesser extent); thus their actions were those of the Federalist Party and also the first major actions of the nation in foreign affairs.. Democratic-Republican position A. Wanted to settle with French and British, due to America's lack of a strong military. B. Overall justification: America wasn't a world power, and thus it was a poor idea to provoke Britain and France. Also, war would have an extremely negative effect on the farmers and merchants which made up the party. IV.

Democratic-Republican position's impact on nation Constituencies of party were employed in the tasks of most of the nation (farming, mercantilism, etc.) Thus, the interests of the majority of the citizens seemed to be with the Democratic-Republicans.