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  • Aristotle Thought
    2,405 words
    The Life of Aristotle When Plato died in 347 bc, Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias (died 345 bc), was ruler. There he counseled Hermias and married his niece and adopted daughter, Pythias. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians, Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athen...
  • Definition For Aristotle
    801 words
    How did Aristotle become a philosopher and what did he do Aristotle was born in 384 BCE. at Stagirus, a Greek colony on the coast of Thrace. His father, Nichomachus, was a court physician to King Amytal of Macedonia, which provided Aristotle his long association with the Macedonian court, which later in his life proved to be a great influence. When he was the age of 10, Aristotle's father died. There he was taken under by Proxenus. Proxenus sent Aristotle at the age of 17 to Athens to complete h...
  • Aristotle's Work In Biology
    833 words
    Aristotle With the possible exception of Plato, Aristotle is the most influential philosopher in the history of logical thought. Logic into this century was basically Aristotelian logic. Aristotle dominated the study of the natural sciences until modern times. Aristotle, in some aspect, was the founder of biology; Charles Darwin considered him as the most important contributor to the subject. Aristotle's Poetic, the first work of literary notice, had a string influence on the theory and practice...
  • Aristotle Left Athens
    346 words
    Aristotle (384-322 BC) ARISTOTLE'S LIFE Aristotle, Greek philosopher and scientist, is one of the most famous of ancient philosophers. He was born in Stagira, Greece to a physician to the royal court. When he became eighteen, Aristotle entered Plato's School in Athens and remained at this academy for twenty years, as a student and then as a teacher. He was recognized as the Academy's brightest and was given the title of 'The Intelligence of the School'. When Plato died in 347 BC, Aristotle left ...
  • Moral Education For Aristotle
    4,916 words
    EDUCATING ETHICAL BEHAVIOR: ARISTOTLE'S VIEWS ON AKRASIADeborah KerdemanUniversity of Washington " Can the teaching of ethics really help cleanse the business world of shady dealings?" Asked by Newsweek magazine during the height of the recent Wall-Street scandals, 1 this query resonates with perennial concerns about whether or not virtue can be taught and how such instruction might best be effected. The problem, Newsweek declares, is not that students lack ethical standards or are incapable of ...
  • Aristotle's Physics
    346 words
    Aristotle's Life Aristotle (384-322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, educator, and scientist, and was also one of the most influential thinkers in Western culture (World Book 663). Through his writings, Aristotle considered, summarized, criticized, and helped to further develop many of these traditions from which he had learned from Plato, his teacher. He was born in Stagira, and both of his parents died when he was a boy. His legal guardian named Proxenus raised him (World Book 663). At the age of ...
  • Aristotle's View Of The Universe
    1,004 words
    To the modern reader, Aristotle's views on astronomy, as presented in Metaphysics, Physics, De Caelo (On the Heavens) and Simplicius' Commentary, will most likely seem very bizarre, as they are based more on a priori philosophical speculation than empirical observation. Although Aristotle acknowledged the importance of 'scientific' astronomy - the study of the positions, distances and motions of the stars - he nevertheless treated astronomy in the abstract, linking it to his overall philosophica...
  • Certain Amount Of Virtuous Activity
    929 words
    Can a Child be Virtuous? In this paper I will argue against Aristotle and his idea that children cannot be virtuous, as we discussed in class. I will do this by giving concrete examples that a certain widespread religion believes in this virtuosity of a child. I will also use a more common example that occurs all the time in America. Aristotle says that children cannot be virtuous because virtues are something that, to be acquired must be practiced over and over again. A child has not had enough...
  • Lead Aristotle
    554 words
    Women in philosophy have always been seen as inferior to men. People had constructed this image of women as being less perfect and through this image, many philosophy were developed. Aristotle provided the first scientific explanation of women's imperfection. He claimed that women were biologically inferior to men. Aristotle claimed that this was a factual statement, but he though it deserved "a rational scientific justification for this belief", (Tuan a, p. 18). Aristotle believed that heat was...
  • Aristotle's Work
    277 words
    Aristotle Aristotle was a Greek philosopher and was born in 348 B.C. He studied under another philosopher Plato and later tutored Alexander the Great at the Macedonian court. In 335 B.C. he opened a school in the Athenian Lyceum. During the anti-macedonian agitation after Alexander's death Aristotle fled to Chalcis where he later died in 322 B.C. His extant writings, largely in the form of lecture notes made by his students, include the Organum (treatises of logic); Physics; Metaphysics; De Anim...
  • Tragic Hero's Fall
    440 words
    While Aristotle's analysis of tragedy may not be directly related to his philosophy of rhetoric, no study of Aristotle would by complete without a short introduction. According to Aristotle, tragedy is "the imitation of an action that is serious and... complete in itself", incorporating "incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish the catharsis of such emotions". The following elements, according to Aristotle, must be found within a literary text in order for it to be truly conside...
  • Aristotle's Thoughts On Zeno's Arrow Argument
    993 words
    The Motionless Arrow: Aristotle's Thoughts on Zeno's Arrow Argument Aristotle's thoughts on Zeno's Arrow Argument as represented in Chapter 9 of Aristotle's Physics: A Guided Study can be understood in such a way that it might not be 'next door to madness'. In this chapter, Aristotle interprets Zeno's argument of the Flying Arrow as 'missing the mark'. There are four premises for this argument, and in Aristotle's opinion, premise three can be rejected. He does not believe that time is composed o...
  • One Of Plato's Greatest Students
    860 words
    The unphilosophical man that is, all of us is at the mercy of sense impressions and unfortunately, our sense impressions oftentimes fail us. Our senses deceive us. But because we trust our senses, we are like prisoners in a cave we mistake shadows on a wall for reality. This is the central argument of Plato " 's Allegory of the Cave which appears in Book VII of The Republic. Plato realized that the Athenian state, and along with it, Athenian direct democracy, had failed to realize its lofty idea...
  • Aristotles Travel In Time
    1,001 words
    Aristotle believed that a freedom of choice for an individual would lead towards the impossibility of establishing human relationships in a considerably practical way. However, all humans tend to establish healthy and happy environment for their personal needs. Well, actually according to this issue Aristotle was not mistaken in his beliefs. Today, it is quite easy to notice the right interpretation of his belief just by observing the lives of people. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has ...
  • Three Possibilities In Aristotles Argument
    1,408 words
    Ancient Political Thought Throughout the Republic it becomes obvious that Plato believes that the best city-state has the highest level of sharing and unity while in the Politics, Aristotle believes that too much unity can de unify a city-state. The "unity" argument is a prime example of Platos way of thinking about the nature of a community, and Aristotles criticism of this unity gives insight into Aristotles way of thinking about his views on the nature of the community. In order to understand...
  • Distinction Between Voluntary And Involuntary Actions
    1,886 words
    Aristotle's Views On Human Action Essay, ResearchAristotle's Views On Human Action In his book, the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle raises questions about human happiness and what it takes to make a good human life. In his quest for an answer, Aristotle covers a great deal of ground and touches upon a variety of topics that, while not obviously so, tie significantly into to the "happiness' of our daily lives. One of these topics is the distinction between our voluntary actions and our involuntary ...

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