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  • Heart Of Human Existence
    416 words
    No Exit By Jean-Paul Sartre Sartre's most popular play is undoubtedly the one-act drama No Exit, which is a discussion of such familiar negative existentialist themes as bad faith, self-destruction, and the impossibility of interpersonal relationships. It is in this play that Sartre's famous line, "Hell is other people", occurs. Although many nineteenth century philosophers developed the concepts of existentialism, it was Sartre who popularized it. His one act play, Huis Clos (Closed Doors) or N...
  • Existence Of The Human Being
    501 words
    Existentialism is the title of the set of philosophical ideals that emphasizes the existence of the human being, the lack of meaning and purpose in life, and the solitude of human existence. Existentialism maintains existence precedes essence: This implies that the human being has no essence, no essential self, and is no more that what he is. He is only the sum of life is so far he has created and achieved for himself. Existentialism acquires its name from insisting that existence precedes essen...
  • Anselm's Actual Argument
    1,402 words
    Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109) Table of Contents (Clicking on the links below will take you to that part of this article) Life Philosophical Writings TheologyLifeThe father of medieval scholasticism and one of the most eminent of English prelates was born at Most Piedmont in 1033. Anselm died at Canterbury, England on April 21, 1109. While a boy he wished to be a monk, but his father forbade it. When he was about twenty-three Anselm left home to live in Burgundy and France. After three years h...
  • Primary And Secondary Substances
    773 words
    There is one thing which all existing things have in common. It is the something particular to each natural body which, imparts to it an independent existence, is cause of its existence, and it determines individuality. For example, when you talk of being healthy, there must be something which is the subject of health. Movement requires something which can be moved. Life is the function of something which is able to have life. Life, motion, or quality cannot exist apart from this something which...
  • Beings Omnipotence As Fact
    482 words
    Implications of Omnipotence The concept of omnipotence seems to reign prominent among most religions, specifically among their myths articulating the origin and the inevitable destruction of our universe. Omnipotence, meaning all-powerful / perfect and predictably all good, produces many contradictions and questions merely by definition. The prospect of a life form being omnipotent is impossible. For the omnipotent being would inexorably be the creator and destroyer of all things; however, a per...
  • Arguments For The Existence Of God
    921 words
    Existence of God The dilemma of the existence of God has troubled mankind for thousands of years. Many philosophers have put forth their theories in order to prove the existence of God. Most of these arguments can be termed as ontological. These arguments differ from other arguments for the existence of God since they are not based on empirical data such as the existence or nature of the universe, but are rather grounded in pure logic. First we will consider the arguments presented by Anselm. He...
  • Idea Of The Existence Of God
    429 words
    Meditation In Descartes Third Meditation, he establishes arguments to prove the existence of God. Descartes believes in "Cogito Ergo Sum" this means I think therefore I am. The "I" in this sentence means the soul. Descartes believes the existence of the mind is better known than the existence of the body. If my soul thinks then I exist. The Cogito proves the existence of self or the mind; this is not the same for the theory of God. Descartes has two arguments in the Third meditation. The argumen...
  • Secular Beliefs With Existential Thought
    1,377 words
    existentialism By: jim smith Existentialism Existentialism is a philosophical movement that developed during the 19th and 20th centuries. One of the first things one may notice about existentialism is the confusion and disagreement of what it actually is. This is because those who developed it have conflicting ideas. Walter Kaufmann, one of the leading existential scholars says, "Certainly, existentialism is not a school of thought nor reducible to any set of tenets. The three writers who appear...
  • Heidegger's Comments Upon Being In The World
    4,579 words
    Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) was, and still is considered to be, along with the likes of Soren Kierkegaard, Edmund Husserl and Jean-Paul Sartre, one of the principal exponents of 20th century Existentialism. An extraordinarily original thinker, a critic of technological society and the leading Ontologist of his time, Heidegger's philosophy became a primary influence upon the thoughts of the younger generations of continental European cultural personalities of his time. The son of a Catholic sext...
  • Necessary Existence Of God
    1,530 words
    Chris Kar cz 114-68-4634 Existence of God or the Lack There of Philosophers and theologians have always searched a way to prove the existence or non-existence of God. Many of these philosophers have made valid points for their views on the subject. Philosophers such as Saint Thomas Aquinas, Decartes, and John Locke argued for the existence of God while others, such as Rowe and Hume, searched for ways to disprove the arguments that these philosophers stated. Saint Thomas Aquinas had five ways in ...
  • Parmenides Rejection Of Change With The Possibility
    1,294 words
    Philosophical thought begins with the Miles ians, where intellectual curiosity propelled thinkers like Anaximander and Heraclitus to attempt to explain the phenomena of the universe by means of specific physical elements. During the 6th century BC, Eleatic's, like Parmenides and Zeno, had rejected physical phenomena and propounded metaphysical paradoxes that cut at the roots of belief in the very existence of the natural world. Parmenides uproots the theories of his predecessors by bearing to li...
  • Existence Of The Human Being
    3,841 words
    The philosophy of Naturalism is a world-view that is built on an unverifiable assumption. The philosophy of naturalism is the fundamental underpinning to the entire atheistic evolutionary world-view (Howard 109). This literary movement in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries visualized a type of fiction that examined human life with "objectivity and scientific inquiry". Naturalist typical views were either "biological determinism by hereditary instincts" or as "socioeconomic determi...
  • Argument Of Man's Existence And Being
    2,383 words
    Existentialism: Relationships In A World Without God Existentialism: Relationships In A World Without God Relationships in a World without God In a world in which lives are shaped by irreversible choices and by random events, a world in which everything occurs but once, existence seems to lose is substance. Life in this design less universe raises questions of identity and can cause turmoil between the relationships of the self to others, the self to history, and the self to God. Through the wor...

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