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  • Ben's Affair With Mrs Robinson
    1,128 words
    The Use of Metaphors Through Filming Techniques in The Graduate Every generation says it won't happen to them. "I'm not going to be like my parents. I'm not going to sell out my dreams". Nothing captures this idea better than The Graduate (Nichols, 1967.) In this twisted film of a college student, Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman, ) and his search for himself, the director Mike Nichols uses a multitude of metaphors to intensify feelings and emotions. Nichols uses a plethora of filming technique...
  • Ben's Wife
    1,376 words
    Leaving Las Vegas, directed by Mike Figgis and based on the autobiographical novel by John O'Brien, is an emotional story about an alcoholic who rejects life and wants to drink himself to death in Las Vegas, and an unselfish prostitute who loves him the way he is. Ben, played by Nicholas Cage, was a former movie producer in Los Angeles and has obviously crumbled in the glamour world of Hollywood which is shown in the opening scene. Here Ben is already an alcoholic when he disturbs former colleag...
  • Ben Over Vincent And Kerry
    3,101 words
    The Deep End of the Ocean was a universal story of traumatic loss and its effects on individuals and families. Penguin Group published The Deep End of the Ocean by Jacquelyn Mitchard in New York, N.Y. in 1996. The book was compelling, heartbreaking, touching, and wonderfully written. Once one picked this book up, putting it down would be impossible, it will keep one up until all hours of the night. It was fiction and in some senses, realistic fiction. Even though when one thought about it, the p...
  • Ben And The Reader
    4,348 words
    "Brink reaches for that unexpected potent strand of Afrikaner thought: an almost religious repugnance toward governmental corruption. And by using a 'very ordinary' Afrikaner as victim, Brink proclaims that no one is South Africa is any longer safe (Redman 5)". Andre Brink's powerful novel, A Dry White Season, was made into a film directed by Euzhan Palcy about ten years after it was written. Euzhan Palcy did an excellent job directing her film, which was intended to open the world's eyes to the...
  • Felicity And Other Characters
    2,132 words
    One of the greatest attributes attached to the melodramatic genre is that it holds a wide variety of styles, settings, and characters. The criteria, like every other film or television show revolves around the dramatic conflict and how the characters deal with it. The evolution of this genre is constantly being revised by those who insist on testing its limit - whether it be shifting the setting to the workplace as seen on West Wing or E.R., or having unique interaction between family members by...
  • Col Ben Cameron
    1,508 words
    Forgotten Treasures Set in the middle and end of the American Civil War and the reconstruction after, Griffith chooses to place his characters in a small South Carolina town of Piedmont. This setting leaves a very distinct southern outlook on the plot. The story begins with a visit of two brothers, Phil and Ted Stoneman going to visit their friends, Ben and Wade Cameron on their southern plantation. Phil brings a picture of his sister Elsie to show Ben, who falls in love with her at first glance...
  • Remarkable Thing About Ben Following The Mouse
    330 words
    Response Journal # 1 - Chapter 1 -How does the author capture your interest at the beginning of the book? - There are a number of things mentioned in the beginning of "Incident at Hawk's Hill" that sparked my interest and that I could relate to. First off the main character, a small boy named Ben aged 6, was in a barn imitating a mouse as he slowly followed it in the hay stacks. There was no reason in him doing so; it was just out of pure pleasure. This introduction of Ben's character excited me...
  • Ben
    1,113 words
    A Dry White Season When I first picked up this book, I didn't know what to expect. Having never read Andre Brink, nor any novel about South Africa, I wondered what the tone would be, whether it would be profound or just preachy. I was also ignorant as to the full extent of the atrocities occurring in the country at the time the book was written. By book's end, however, I found that not only is Brink a brilliant writer, but that the issue of Apartheid is about far more than just a racist system o...

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