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  • Blake's Poem London
    1,017 words
    In Blake's 'London' the speaker connects various characters and socio / political institutions in order to critique the injustices perpetrated in England. The busy, commercial city of London functions as a space in which the speaker can imagine the inescapable interconnections of English institution and citizens. Although separated by differences of class and gender, the citizens of London brush up against each other so that the misery of the poor and dispossessed is a direct indictment of the c...
  • Blake's Tone Toward His Speaker
    1,745 words
    William Blake is said to be a very visual artist and in his visions, is where he got all of his ideas. In this essay I'm going to explore some of Blake's works and the visions that caused him to write about some of the things that he wrote about. William Blake, born November 28, 1757, grew up as the son of a haberdasher, Blake, with close to zero education in a London suburb due to having a bad temper. He taught himself everything that he knew. From the ages of 0 to 14, he taught himself how to ...
  • Fog In Its Use Of Metaphor
    1,541 words
    Poetry Assignment In this assignment I will gracefully compare and contrast two short poems. In my selection for the poems, I kept in mind that the two poems needed to have something in common metaphorically or thematically. After many hours of browsing I came upon two poems that contained an ultimately strange connection metaphorically and in content. Interestingly, the two also had numerous differences. The first poem I encountered was "The Sick Rose" written by William Blake in 1794. Soon aft...
  • First Stanza Of Blake's Poem
    1,749 words
    A Reading of William Blake's "London" William Blake channels his general dissatisfaction of the organization of society during the late eighteenth century in his lyrical poem entitled "London" (1794). Blake uses vividly expressive language through the spoken observations of a symbolic character he created to narrate and recite social and political problems afflicting this metropolis in the late 1700's and early 1800's. The poem's rhythmically patterned linear style, which is very strictly struct...
  • Blake's Songs Of Innocence
    2,144 words
    Franklin Garcia Professor Castillo English 1302.013 November 4, 2002 Blake's cry for a voice William Blake had a vision. It was a thought that changed the way poetry and writing would be viewed from here to eternity. Blake's point of views and associations with the characters represents a change in the way the reader dictates who the victim is really and who is not. In Blake's "The Chimney Sweeper" from the Songs of Innocence and Experience, both aspects of heaven and hell can be examined just t...
  • Blake's The Chimney Sweeper William
    948 words
    Report on William Blake's The Chimney Sweeper William Blake's "The Chimney Sweeper" was mainly about the possibilities of both hope and faith. Although the poem's connotation is that of a very dark and depressed nature, the religious imagery Blake uses indicates that the sweeps will have a brighter future in eternity. In lines 4 - 8 when Blake writes, "There's little Tom Dare, who cried when his head, That curled like a lamb's back, was shaved: so I said 'Hush, Tom! never mind it, for when your ...
  • Song Of Innocence
    450 words
    'The Chimney Sweeper' By William Blake Poem Analysis Unlike the one in Songs of Innocence, 'The Chimney Sweeper', in Songs of Experience is very dark and pessimistic. This poem also seems to be very judgmental and gives motives for everything, but unlike Song of Innocence, the sweeper in this poem does not free himself from his misery. In the first two lines, Blake gives us an image of an anguished child in a state of agony or even in a state of corruption. The color black seems to be very impor...
  • Poem About The Nature Of Creation
    373 words
    Published in 1794 as one of the Songs of Experience, Blake's 'The Tyger " is a poem about the nature of creation, much as is his earlier poem from the Songs of Innocence, 'The Lamb. ' However, this poem takes on the darker side of creation, when its benefits are less obvious than simple joys. Blake's simplicity in language and construction contradicts the complexity of his ideas. This poem is meant to be interpreted in comparison and contrast to 'The Lamb,' showing the 'two contrary states of th...
  • Dirty People And Blake
    408 words
    In this poem, Blake is trying to dispel the myth of grandeur and glory associated with London and to show the 'real' people of London and how they felt. London was seen and portrayed as a powerful and wonderful city where the wealthy lived and socialized. However, Blake knew that London was really a dirty, depressing and poverty-stricken city filled with slums and the homeless and chronically sick. To reveal the truth, Blake combines description of people and places with the thoughts and emotion...
  • Line Twenty Three Blake
    1,212 words
    Never Lose Hope William Blake, born on November 28, 1757, in London is one of the greatest English poets. His work is studied today all over the world. One of Blake's poems, "The Chimney Sweeper", shows many signs of immortality. In this poem, immortality can only be reached by maintaining hope in a hopeless world and embracing happiness. An example of this is line 20: "He'd have God for his father, and never want joy". Immortality is something people have chased for years and have never been ab...
  • Line Of The Poem
    760 words
    How wonderful this poem becomes when it is seen as part of this whole fabric in contrast to The Songs of Innocence, most especially The Lamb. In this context, this poem becomes a psalm to the wondrous work of the Creator, who created both the innocent beauty of nature and the awesome grandeur of hell and its inhabitants. Seeing it in this light makes the previously mentioned line even more important, perhaps the "thesis" line of the poem or even the group of poems. Even the title, Songs of Exper...
  • Blake's Poems And Paintings Thought Blake
    2,077 words
    William Blake: Sane or Mad " [There] is no doubt that this poor man was mad, but there is something in his madness which interests me more than the sanity of Lord Byron and Walter Scott", William Wordsworth said in reference to William Blake. Blake, unlike other writers, was born and lived in moderate ways, with many talents; he lived throughout the romantic period, and wrote many of the greatest and controversial poems of his time including "The Lamb" and "The Tyger". These poems are from two b...
  • Two Opposite Sounds Of The Poem
    666 words
    Rhythm and the Tyger The Tyger is one of the most famous works by William Blake. It is a great poem, which clearly shows the reader the way in which poetic devices and sound and rhythm affect the meaning of a poem. William Blake questions the nature of God, and faith. He asks two important rhetorical questions in the poem. Does God create both good and evil If so what right does God have to do this The poem is a cycle of questioning the creator of the tyger, discussing how it could have been cre...
  • Poems Blake Questions
    665 words
    Many poems written by the same author often have similar themes. The authors usually believe in something very strongly and their poems usually reflect such a nature. Sometimes poets reflect aspects of their personal life in their poems. In the poems "The Lamb" and "The Tiger", by William Blake, the poet discusses similar themes in both. In the poem "The Lamb", I interpret that William Blake discusses many points questioning creation and religion. He describes the lamb as being an object of inno...
  • Loaded Gun And Blake's Poem
    965 words
    For my analysis, I chose to compare the poems of Emily Dickinson and William Blake. Dickinson's poem is entitled My Life had stood-a Loaded Gun and Blake's poem is entitled The Tyger. In both poems, nature plays an important part and it is obvious to the reader that both Dickinson and Blake feel a fondness, yet a slight fear towards nature. In My Life had stood-a Loaded Gun, Dickinson gives the reader the feeling that nature is her source of guidance and inspiration. Like Blake, Dickinson believ...
  • My Pretty Rose Tree A Flower
    880 words
    My Pretty Rose-Tree, written by William Blake, is a poem of love, jealousy, and sorrow. This eight-line poem, following the a bab a cac rhyme pattern, is full of strong symbolism and a great deal of personification, all used in an attempt to express the narrators feelings. William Blake brings the flowers alive with the personified characteristics he has given to them. Blake is describing a man who is completely in-love with one women, while at the same time he is being tempted by another. This ...
  • Selection Of Poems By William Blake
    1,365 words
    William Blake was born on November 28th in the year 1757; he became one of England's greatest poets. He wrote many famous poems, including "Tyger" and "Jerusalem". Many poems are categorized into either Songs of innocence or Songs of experience. This is a little volume of illuminated pages. Blake believed the innocence of childhood is contrasted with the experience and corruption of the adult world. He married Catherine Boucher in 1782 and enjoyed a happy marriage. He was a poet of imagination a...
  • Innocence And Experience Poem
    1,717 words
    The term 'romantic' first appeared in the 18th Century and originally meant 'romantic like'. But from about 1750-1870 there was a movement in literature and the romantic era was created along with the 'romantic poets'. The first generation of romantic poets were Wordsworth, Blake and Coleridge. These poets changed the face of English poetry. Being the era of passion the 'romantics' were interested in individuality imagination and nature rejecting the values of the 18th century. The French revolu...
  • Next Set Of Lines In The Poem
    1,132 words
    Weep! Weep! Weep! Weep!" (the Chimney Sweeper 3) These are the cries of a young boy in William Blake's "the Chimney Sweeper". Blake wrote many poems and in most cases they had hidden meanings. In the case of "the Chimney Sweeper" Blake what is Blake's hidden meaning. What is Blake's point? In this case Blake criticizes suggesting that child labor is a socially acceptable thing. In "the Chimney Sweeper" the narrator turns out to be a small boy about the age of 6 or 7. The boy discuses his trouble...
  • Blake's Tree
    2,028 words
    "Anger,' "wrath,' and "fear' are very prominent in the short sixteen-line piece and engulf you from the start. In this paper, there will be an argument that "A Poison Tree' is a symbol for the lack of restraint and self-control in man. An argument that Blake, if referring to himself in the poem, uses himself as the serpent from the Garden of Eden, except as a serpent with a conscious. The first stanza shows In choosing a poem from the English Romanticism era, I found one that particularly stands...

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