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  • Primary Cause Of The War With Britain
    1,409 words
    The War of 1812 The United States of America began to see the effects of Anglo-French War by the early 1800's. This European quarrel began affecting the United States shipping industry. Britain and France were violating neutral shipping rights of American merchants. They thought of America as weak due to inadequate time the nation had to develop. These violations were the first and primary provoking factors that led to war with Britain. There was reason that Britain became the target of US milit...
  • Economic Areas
    579 words
    Were Economic Factors Primarily Responsible for Nineteenth-Century British Imperialism? In society today the almighty dollar is what motivates most people's actions. However, there are other reasons that can promote a change within a system such as morals, religious beliefs, values, and ethics. During the nineteenth century, society was not much different from that of the present day as the economy remains one of the most important parts of the country. This is evident in the time period when th...
  • Impact Of The Proposed Devolution For Scotland
    2,391 words
    Discuss the Impact of the Proposed Devolution for Scotland "Britain has never relished doses of constitutional reform, although they have accepted the drip-feed of frequent, unpalatable and ill-fated local government changes. Ambivalence to reform was reinforced in recent decades. The 1974 Labour government proposed an ambitious program of devolution for Scotland and Wales. It was a luckless policy, not least because of Labours divisions Now it is all different. The case for Scottish devolution ...
  • Contribution Of The Canadian Royal Air Force
    2,549 words
    Shortly after the Battle of Britain Sir Winston Churchill, the prime minister of Great Britain, is quoted as exclaiming, "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few". The few that Churchill was referring to were the brave aircrew that undertook the daunting task of repelling the massive offensive by the dreaded German air corps, the Luftwaffe. In the year 1940 Adolf Hitler ordered an offensive in coordination with an attempted invasion of the isle of Britain. The ...
  • United Kingdom Population Total Population 60
    3,194 words
    Britain has a diverse population that includes people with connections to every continent of the world. The ethnic origins of this population have been complicated by immigration, intermarriage, and the constant relocation of people in this highly developed industrial and technological society. Nevertheless, a few particulars about the historical formation of the population are noteworthy. Early Ethnic Groups Roman Britain Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 bc to conquer the native peoples, cal...
  • Britain's Excessive Investment In Foreign Countries
    645 words
    During the nineteenth century Great Britain was one the major foreign lenders of capital to countries in Europe, Asia, and Americas. While in the late 1820's most of the British investments were concentrated in the North America, in 1860-1870 Empire countries became the major recipient of British capital. India was the most absorbing region of British funds, there Britain invested 95 m. in railways between 1845 and 1875. After 1870 about one half of British investments concentrated in Empire cou...
  • Position Of King George Of Great Britain
    400 words
    Throughout the first part of the declaration, Jefferson was writing of people's natural rights. It was based upon the ideas of John Locke. He believed in life, liberty, and property. Locke felt as if the government did not protect Or submit the natural (or Jefferson referred to them as unalienable) rights of its citizens, then the people had the right to overthrow the government. Jefferson stated that the government existed to protect the people and also be beneficial to them. Stating that anyth...
  • Most Successful Labour Government
    2,262 words
    To judge success, we need to look at what we are comparing their success or failure with. In this case, success is judged by how Labour achieved their aims, and if the present situation in Britain improved. There are also many different areas that success can be judged in. These are economical, political and social. From studying these individual areas, an overall judgment can be made. Also who is judging this success Varying views were seen depending on the political stance of the judge. Howeve...
  • Most Important Reason For Britain
    1,973 words
    After the end of the Second World War in which, to Britain, it was nearly a repeat of the First World War that Britain had experienced the same things as the aftermaths. The war put severe strains on her economic resources as well as the undermining of her export markets. Even though Britain had won the war, the impacts on Britain afterwards were not always positive, in that, as everyone know, war created tragedy. It did not make any good to anybody, even the winner. The victors also had to spen...
  • Britain's Conversion To The Euro
    3,477 words
    The Euro The question of whether Britain should gravitate toward adopting the euro is indeed an enormous one. It is enormous in that it covers many levels of importance, and its effects can be measured differently according to whom you ask. To some it is a matter of relative insignificance (like the savings in currency exchange when you go on vacation), and to others it is paramount (as in who will be running the country's economy? ). I firmly believe that Britain should not adopt the euro altho...
  • Common Sense By Thomas Paine
    1,807 words
    Common Sense by Thomas Paine caused an immediate declaration of independence, assuming a special moral obligation of America to the rest of the world. Not long after publication, the spirit of Paine's argument was shown in the American Declaration of Independence Paine's goal in his infamous pamphlet, Common Sense, is to inspire and motivate the pro-revolutionaries and bring those with doubts to the cause by betraying the king and eliminating arguments for reconciliation. He uses the cultural as...
  • Britain's Entry Into The European Economic Community
    917 words
    Britain's entry into the European Economic Community was a source of great conflict in Europe. There were suspicions that French President de Gaulle did not want Britain to enter in order to maintain his country's hegemony over the EEC. De Gaulle spoke of the cultural and institutional differences that would make Britain incompatible with the Six. The British governments motives were even questioned as to whether they only wanted to reap the economic benefits of the EEC. The following is my asse...
  • King Vortigern And His Other Uncle Uther
    860 words
    The Crystal Cave, by Mary Stewart, is a story in the first person, whereas an elderly Merlin tells of his coming of age. The novel began in medieval Wales in the kingdom of Maridunum. The story then moves to Brittany, or Lesser Britain. He then comes back to Wales, then, the rest of Greater Britain, ending up in Cornwall. The themes of this story are about coming of age, good versus evil and things aren t always, as they appear to be. Myrddin Emyrs, also known as Merlin Ambrosius was the bastard...
  • Its Goal For The Peace In Europe
    390 words
    The Congress of Vienna was an international conference that was called in order to remake Europe after the downfall of Napoleon I. Many territorial decisions had to be made in the conference that was held in Vienna, Austria, from September 1814 to June 1815. The main goal of the conference was to create a balance of power that would preserve the peace. Important People: Though the conference opened with a series of glittery balls and conferences, the delegates soon got down to work. Mainly, the ...
  • High Demand For The Increased Population
    543 words
    What was the most important factor in the development of industrialisation Justify your choice. Necessity is the mother of invention A popular saying which can be true of the industrial revolution in Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries. As a result of the rapidly increasing population during this time, there was a high demand and need for essential items (such as clothing and food) to enable the population to survive. This meant the invention of machines and tools for the mass production of g...
  • Breakdown Of Concert Of Europe
    748 words
    After the downfall of Napoleon, a series of congresses was called to solve the potential problems. The so-called concert of Europe is a term used to describe the Powers working together to maintain peace. Yet, the interpretation of keeping peace of the three dominant Powers, namely Austria, Russia and Britain, was more than different. In terms of Britain, peace was to be maintained by keeping the balance of power and avoiding the upset of Vienna settlement, what Britain concerned most was her tr...
  • Fighter Airfields And Radar Stations
    2,594 words
    The Battle of Britain The Battle of Britain began to become intense on July 10, 1940, with German dive-bombers attacking convoys off the South and East coast of England and with raids on coastal towns from Dover to Plymouth. The RAF's seven hundred fighters faced four times that number of enemy fighters and bombers. Shipping losses increased but the real objective of destroying British fighters in combat was not achieved. At the end of the first week in August the RAF had lost ninety-six fighter...
  • Loyalist And The Patriots
    331 words
    Patriots vs. Loyalist Over two hundred years ago the American Revolution occurred due to the British wanting to take economic and land control. The act by the British is what started the loyalist and the patriots. The patriots were colonist who separated from Britain to gain independence from them while the loyalist were colonist who stayed loyal to Britain. There were many differences between the patriots and the loyalist but they had one thing in common they were fighting for what they believe...
  • Invasion Of Britain By The Celts
    1,472 words
    By the first millennium BC, Britain had already established close contact with the continent. Communication systems had already developed as raw materials such as metals were brought from place to place. Evidence of this is seen where the technology and style incorporated in different objects show similarities in repeated decorative designs of their development throughout Britain and Continental Europe. The first millennium BC saw changes in the ways in which societies were developing. Ireland w...
  • Example Of Britain's Flawed Democracy
    872 words
    Britain's Flawed Democracy The development of democracy in Britain was unlike that of any other country. Its gradualness and lack of contestation throughout the years cause many to believe that the democracy in Britain is superior to those in other countries. However, this idea has led to a lack of seriousness about democratic rights as well as a skewed view of the way that a true democracy should work. I believe that Britain's democracy is flawed for three main reasons. First, there is no writt...

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