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  • Edgar Linton And Heathcliff
    1,068 words
    WUTHERING HEIGHTS MAIN CHARACTERS Catherine Earnshaw ~ She is the daughter of Mr. Earnshaw and the sister of Hindley. She is also Heathcliff's foster sister. Heathcliff and Catherine are in love, but she marries Edgar Linton instead. When Cathy died, she wanted both Heathcliff and Edgar to suffer because Edgar never understood why she loved Heathcliff and Heathcliff because he never knew why she married Edgar. Catherine Linton ~ She is the daughter of the older Catherine and Edgar Linton. Her mo...
  • Catherine And Heathcliff
    1,375 words
    In Brontes novel Wuthering Heights the idea compensation for love lost is discussed. Wuthering Heights is a quiet house in the country where the Earnshaws and Heathcliff live. Heathcliff loves Catherine Earnshaw very much but, she decides to marry another man, Edgar. Heathcliff marries Edgar sister just to make Catherine jealous. At the end Heathcliff abandons his plan for vengeance and professes his love for Catherine only to see her die soon after. In the novel Wuthering Heights Bronte shows t...
  • Heathcliff And Catherine's Relationship
    996 words
    When Wuthering Heights was published it was blasted its contemporaries as obscene. They railed that Catherine and Heathcliff were the most immoral and in general worst people they had ever had the misfortune of reading about. Although Wuthering Heights has taken it's rightful place as masterwork of 19th century literature and Emily Bront has receive credit for her work, it is still possible to see where the early attacks are based. Heathcliff especially behaves in a very obtuse manner. The basis...
  • Life For Heathcliff After Catherine's Death
    1,904 words
    Heathcliff is introduced in Nelly's narration as a seven-year-old Liverpool foundling (probably an Irish famine immigrant) brought back to Wuthering Heights by Mr. Earnshaw. His presence in Wuthering Heights overthrows the prevailing habits of the Earnshaw family, members of the family soon become involved in turmoil and fighting and family relationships become spiteful and hateful. Even on his first night, he is the reason Mr. Earnshaw breaks the toys he had bought for his children. "From the v...
  • Catherine II
    386 words
    At the beginning of Wuthering Heights Lockwoode makes a mistake in assuming that young Catherine II was Heathcliffes wife. It is easy to see how he, a stranger unfamiliar with the Earnshaw-Linton family history could have made such a mistake. But, had Lockwoode known about the life of the woman Heathcliffe had always wanted to marry, Catherine I, and then have been able to compare it to life of her daughter, Catherine II, he would never have been able to make that mistake, for the lives of the m...
  • Big Role On Heathcliff's Love For Catherine
    816 words
    In the novel Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte, shows how different aspects of themes are presented for a reader's consideration. Some of the important themes in Wuthering Heights are, revenge, spiritual feelings between main characters, obsession, selfishness, and responsibility. Bronte mainly focuses on the spiritual feelings of her characters. The difference between the feeling that Catherine has for Heathcliff and the one she feels for Edgar is that Heathcliff is part of her nature, he is like...
  • Catherine Earnshaw And Heathcliff And Catherines Brother
    1,639 words
    Wuthering Heights Wuthering Heights competes with established social reality. Throughout the nineteenth century, the British novel displayed an increasing degree of realism (Student Resource Center np). Wuthering Heights is built around a central fall-generally understood to be Catherine and Heathcliffs fall from hell to heaven (Frederick 322). The first generation of Wuthering Heights failed to develop a mature understanding of themselves and others (322). Modern critics disagree over what the ...
  • Heathcliff's Revenge
    1,862 words
    What usually comes to mind when one thinks of Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights? Most will visualize tortured lovers against the extraordinary moors. Perhaps one will even recall the scene of one lover, Heathcliff, opening the grave of his Catherine to dig a space where they can be joined eternally. Yet another equally powerful emotion appears throughout the novel as an antithesis to love, that of revenge. Revenge first forms the basis of the actions of Hindley, the Earnshaw son, toward Heathclif...
  • Catherine's Relationship With Heathcliff
    717 words
    The intensity of feeling between Catherine and Heathcliff defies family barriers imposed by Catherine's brother, Hindley after their father's death. Heathcliff was ill-treated by Hindley after the death of the old Earnshaw: He drove him from their company to the servants, deprived him of the instructions of the curate... He bore his degradation pretty well at first, because Cathy taught him what she learnt, and work or play with him in the fields. They both promised fair to grow up as rude as sa...
  • Catherine's Relationship With Heathcliff
    836 words
    Catherine Earnshaw Catherine Earnshaw is the daughter of Mr. Earnshaw and his wife; Catherine falls powerfully in love with Heathcliff, the orphan Mr. Earnshaw brings home from Liverpool. She was born at Wuthering Heights and was raised with her brother Hindley. Catherine loves Heathcliff so intensely that she claims they are the same person but does not marry him because Hindley has degraded him after their father's death so her desire for social advancement motivates her to marry Edgar Linton ...
  • Catherine And Heathcliff
    1,308 words
    The central conflict in the novel "Wuthering Heights" written by Emily Bronte is Heathcliff. Heathcliff's internal conflicts affect how all of the other characters interrelate. Heathcliff throughout the book never does anything honorable or dignified. Heathcliff creates whirlwinds of problems by just being present, sometimes, by not even doing a thing. Heathcliff's problems not only the affect the Earnshaw's but also their neighbors Edgar & Isabella Linton. Heathcliff comes to live with the Earn...
  • Heathcliff And Catherines Interactions
    947 words
    Love is an amazing emotion. People spend much of their lives searching for true love. When true love is found, people will do everything possible to hold on to and cherish it for eternity. It is said that true love can only be found once in a lifetime that is filled with intense everlasting emotions. A classic example of this powerful emotion is displayed by the characters Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw in Emily Brontes Wuthering Heights. Wuthering Heights examines a passionate and overwhelmi...
  • Catherine And Heathcliff
    1,489 words
    Wuthering Heights Wuthering Heights is the only book Emily Bronte ever wrote. It is a very powerful story about love and hate and sorrow and death. It spans thirty years and is all narrated by, first Mr. Lockwood, and more importantly, Ellen Dean, the faithful housekeeper. At the beginning of the book, Mr. Lockwood had just arrived at Thrushcross Grange as a tenant. He went to see Mr. Heathcliff, the man he was renting the house from. When he arrives at Wuthering Heights, he meets a young lady t...
  • Catherine And Heathcliff's Passionate Nature
    1,077 words
    Literary Criticism of Wuthering Heights Wuthering Heights has proven to be much more than just a silly love story about characters, who, in the end objectify no real thought or emotion from the reader. It appears to be better accepted as a window into the human soul, where one sees the loss, suffering, self discovery, and triumph of the characters in this novel. Both the Image of the Book by Robert McKibben, and Control of Sympathy in Wuthering Heights by John Hagan, strive to prove that neither...
  • Heathcliff's Rivals For Catherine's Love
    803 words
    Lord David Cecil suggests that the theme of Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte, is a universe of opposing forces-storm and calm. Wuthering Heights, the land of storm, is a sturdy house that is set up high on the windy moors, belonging to the Earnshaw family. The house is highly charged with emotion of hatred, cruelty, violence, and savage love. In comparison, Thrushcross Grange, the land of calm, is settled in the valley and is the residence of the genteel Lintons. The same differences exists be...
  • Heathcliff A Victim Of Villain
    930 words
    Heathcliff: A Victim of Villainy In 'Wuthering Heights,' we see tragedies follow one by one, most of which are focused around Heathcliff, the antihero of the novel. After the troubled childhood Heathcliff goes through, he becomes embittered towards the world and loses interest in everything but Catherine Earnshaw -his childhood sweetheart whom he had instantly fallen in love with. -and revenge upon anyone who had tried to keep them apart. The novel begins with a few short introduction chapters w...
  • Catherine 1's Love For Heathcliff
    547 words
    Final Draft Set in England on the Yorkshire Moors in the 19th century, Emily Bront"e^1's novel Wuthering Heights is the story of lovers who try to withstand the separation of social classes and keep their love alive. The main characters, Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff grew upon a middle class English countryside cottage called Wuthering Heights. Heathcliff was the servant and Catherine the daughter of the owner of Wuthering Heights. As children, Heathcliff and Catherine were the best of frien...
  • Heathcliff And Catherine
    811 words
    Love conquers all. It permeates throughout the land to intermingle among houses that are afar; it conceals itself within the hearts of lovers; it even seeps through the crevices of the earth to haunt the living. Through all of the gloom, revenge, evil and hate that surround Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange, love has triumphed over all. While the relationships between certain characters in the novel, Wuthering Heights are tense at times; the force of love overcomes any ill sentiments poss...
  • Mr Earnshaw S Son Hindley
    413 words
    Love does not always bring happiness to people and lovers do not always treat each other well. When their families! or social pressure separates them, lovers can try their best to ignore the difficulties, but if they separated themselves, they! ll be more miserable. The main characters in this book! ^0 Wuthering Heights! +/- belong to the lovers who separated themselves. In 1770, Mr. Earnshaw brought a gypsy child to his family and made his name Heathcliff. Mr. Earnshaw!'s son Hindley hated him ...
  • Catherine's Mean Comments About Heathcliffe's Appearence Show
    553 words
    This passage is crucial to the development of Heathcliffe and Catherine's relationship. It shows how their friendship is beginning to change. Both of them act differently toward eachother and this can be seen in many ways. Several literary devices make the passage more evident of this growing change such as point of view, diction, and selection of detail. Catherine was gone for a short period of five weeks, which proved to be long enough to alter the person she once was. She matured in that smal...

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