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  • Pardon Of Their Sins
    973 words
    Canterbury Tales Aaron T alton In Canterbury Tales, Chaucer uses the Pardoner and the Prioress to subtlety display what he thinks of the church. The Prioress is after the attention of men. The Pardoner is after money. Chaucer shows the corruptness and hypocrisy integrated into the religious society at the time of the story. He saw the religious society as a corrupt society. The Prioress is a nun that seems to be infatuated with how she appears romantically and physically towards males. She was k...
  • Chaucer's Satire
    1,295 words
    THESIS: THE ELEMENT OF SATIRE WITH RESPECT TO CHAUCER'S "CANTERBURY TALES " It is human nature to laugh when an event goes wrong or to make a mockery of an all too serious person. But what if authors had the power to use this instinct within humans to drive a point across? In fact they do and they call this literary tool... satire. Many authors have used this tool as a backbone in their writings; others have only managed to throw in elements of satire here and there. However, there was one autho...
  • Pardoner's Tale
    1,175 words
    The Pardoner's Tale In Geoffrey Chaucer's famous work, The Canterbury Tales, he points out many inherent flaws of human nature, all of which still apply today. In the phrase, 'avarice is the root of all evil'; (Hopper, 343), one can fail to realize the truth in this timeless statement because of its repetition throughout history. Whether applied to the corrupt clergy of Geoffrey Chaucer's time, selling indulgences, or the corrupt televangelists of today, auctioning off salvation to those who can...
  • Most Obvious Fraudulent Trait Of The Pardoner
    852 words
    Fraudulence Personified The Pardoner is the best representation of an allegorical character in "The Prologue" of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. The Pardoner is the perfect personification of fraudulence. He shows this in three basic ways: his appearance, speech, and actions. If one just glances through the reading of the Pardoner than one will think that he is a good religious man, but if one look further into it than he will find the small double meanings that he is the exact opposite...
  • Pardoner's Psychology
    793 words
    In the Mind of the Pardoner In 'The Pardoner's Tale,' ; Geoffrey Chaucer masterfully frames an informal homily. Through the use of verbal and situational irony, Chaucer is able to accentuate the moral characteristics of the Pardoner. The essence of the story is exemplified by the blatant discrepancy between the character of the storyteller and the message of his story. By analyzing this contrast, the reader can place himself in the mind of the Pardoner in order to account for his psychology. In ...
  • Clergy Of The Medieval Christian Church
    732 words
    Canterbury Tales-A personal perspective on the Medieval Christian Church In researching Geoffrey Chaucer's collection of stories named The Canterbury Tales, an interesting illustration of the Medieval Church becomes evident. A crooked society exists within the corrupt, medieval church community. Not all of the clergy's intentions were corrupt, but as Chaucer, through his character the Pardoner, so well put it,' Radix malo rum est '; , (Love of money is the root of all evil). Many corrupted evils...
  • Chaucer's Pardoner
    2,030 words
    A Look at the Pardoner: the Genius of Chaucer The Canterbury Tales is a literary masterpiece in which the brilliant author Geoffrey Chaucer sought out to accomplish various goals. Chaucer wrote his tales during the late 1300's. This puts him right at the beginning of the decline of the Middle Ages. Historically, we know that a middle class was just starting to take shape at this time, due to the emerging commerce industry. Chaucer was able to see the importance and future success of the middle c...
  • Irony In The Pardoner's Tale
    666 words
    Irony in The Pardoner's tale Geoffrey Chaucer is indeed one of the greatest English poets. His masterpiece The Canterbury Tales is noted one of the finest works of literature in the world. Chaucer used the setting of a pilgrimage to Canterbury, where Archbishop Thomas a Becket was murdered, as a frame story to tell the tales of each of his memorable and vividly drawn characters. One noted tale is that of the Pardoner, in which Chaucer uses exemplum to provide full effect of this simple but brill...
  • Chaucer's Prioress
    1,279 words
    Bitter Scorn During the later half of the fourteenth century, the clergy of the Roman Catholic Church were forced to contend with the public's increasing dissatisfaction with the church. This discontent was rooted in the corruption that the common person of Europe was beginning to see. Among the few authors able to show the hypocrisy and dishonesty within the church to the public was Geoffrey Chaucer. In the Prologue of Chaucer's collection of sardonic poems, The Canterbury Tales, he pokes fun a...
  • Religious Elements Of The Pardoner's Tale
    3,092 words
    Religious elements of the Pardoner's Tal The role of the Pardoner in medieval society itself is a role of religious importance, no matter how irreligious the individual. The pardoner is one who has a papal bull allowing them to sell indulgences. Indulgences were pieces of paper sold for the forgiveness of sins and had a somewhat dubious moral status as their ability to forgive was not actually confirmed within the Bible, instead an indulgence was formally an award of the surplus of good left by ...
  • Story Of The Pardoner
    518 words
    The Medieval Period, a time of Lords and Knights, pilgrimages to visit famous shrines, and the profound power held by the church. Due to this power, certain members of the clergy take their authority a little too far and abuse their rights. Power is not easily contended, and there are certain characteristics to be administered in order for one to be a member of the power-holding church. Because of this limitation, the clergy are identified as ideal or hypocritical. Having to demonstrate actions ...

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