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  • Land From The Cherokee Indians
    1,719 words
    The generalization that, "The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830's was more a reformulation of the national policy that had been in effect since the 1790's than a change in that policy", is valid. Every since the American people arrived at the New World they have continually driven the Native Americans out of their native lands. Many people wanted to contribute to this removal of the Cherokees and their society...
  • Cherokee Indian Nation
    3,239 words
    Barbara Huston History 17 A Mrs. Sanchez September 05, 2005 Way The Cherokee have live through good time and some bad time The American Indian History of the United States is always associated with the Cherokee Indian nation. The Cherokee's were by far the largest and most advanced of the tribes. This man was Hernando de Soto was the first European explorer to come into contact with the Cherokees, when he arrived in their territory in 1540. Then he went and came in contact with Native Americans ...
  • Americans And Cherokee Indians
    1,553 words
    Cherokee Nation Before invasion of the Americans onto Cherokee territory, the Cherokee lived in peace and harmony. Keetoowah is the name of the ancient Cherokee town in the eastern homelands, said to be the "Mother Town" of the people (Conley 18). Many of the Cherokee Indians originated here according to the traditions. They referred themselves as Ani-Kituwagi, meaning Keetoowah People, or Ani -- ya, the Real People (Conley 27). The fertile lands of the Keetoowah were filled of many resources, b...
  • Lands From The Cherokee People
    2,489 words
    The United States and the Cherokee Indians The debate over the legality of sovereignty and acquired lands from the native Americans, specifically the Cherokee, has long been debated. The issues involved have included treaties, land sold, and the right of the Government to physically enforce their rules on Indian land 'sovereignty'. This paper will examine the strategy used by the Federal Governments, the State Governments as well as those of the Cherokee Indians. The three-way relationship as we...
  • Cherokee From The Many Other Native
    3,077 words
    The word Cherokee comes from a Creek word 'Chelokee' meaning 'people of a different speech. ' In their own language the Cherokee called themselves the Aniyunwiya or 'principal people' or the Keetoowah, 'people of Kituhwa. ' The Cherokee are perhaps one of the most interesting of Native American Groups. Their life and culture are closely intertwined with early American settlers and the history of our own nation's struggle for freedom. In the interest of promoting tolerance and peace, and with reg...
  • Cherokee Nation And Infuriated President Jackson
    909 words
    The Cherokee Victory The Cherokee Indians, the most cooperative and accommodating to the political institutions of the united states, suffered the worst fate of all Native Americans when voluntarily or forcibly moved west. In 1827 the Cherokees attempted to claim themselves as an independent nation within the state of Georgia. When the legislature of the state extended jurisdiction over this 'nation,' the Cherokees sought legal actions, not subject to Georgia laws and petitioned the United State...
  • Cherokee East
    1,517 words
    The Removal of the Cherokees After England's acceptance of the terms of the peace made with France and Spain in 1763, in which France gave Louisiana to Spain, the grants formerly made to the six English colonies were considered good only to the Mississippi River. During the American Revolution and soon there after these former colonies were considered good only to the Mississippi River. During the American Revolution and soon thereafter these former colonies, now states of the Union ceded their ...
  • Cherokee Removal
    1,159 words
    In The Cherokee Removal, Perdue and Green show the trials that the Cherokee faced in the years from 1700 to 1840. This book shows how the Americans tried to remove these Indians from the southeastern part of the United States. The Cherokees tried to overcome the attempts of removal, but finally in 1838, they were removed from the area. The Cherokees lived in the valleys of rivers that drained the southern Appalachians (Perdue, 1). The British first came into Cherokee country in 1700. They came f...
  • Cherokee Chief
    1,035 words
    The Cherokee Indians The American Indian History in the Eastern part of the country is always associated with the Cherokee Indian nation. The Cherokee's were by far the largest and most advanced of the tribes when Europeans first arrived and came in contact with Native Americans. There are too many tribes to go over background on every one of them, so I'm going to focus on the Cherokee's since many of their ways and customs are so similar to all the other tribes in the East. When Europeans first...
  • Oklahoma A Cherokee Tribe
    665 words
    The Cherokee Tribe The Cherokees are a North American tribe. This Indian tribe has a lot to do with our history. It is the biggest Indian tribe that we have today. The Cherokee tribes had a wide range where they lived across the United States, from Texas to the Great Lakes. The tribes started in Asia, and over time they ended up in the Great Smoky Mountains. In Georgia, the government tried to run all the Cherokee off of their land. But when they appealed it, it failed. The government even tried...
  • Sovereignty Of The Cherokee Indian Land
    1,450 words
    President Jackson and the Removal of the Cherokee Indians " The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830's was more a reformulation of the national policy that had been in effect since the 1790's than a change in that policy. ' The dictum above is firm and can be easily proved by examining the administration of Jackson and comparison to the traditional course which was carried out for about 40 years. After 1825 the f...
  • Trail Of Tears And The Other Cherokee
    1,051 words
    The Trail of Tears, was it unjust and inhumane? What happened to the Cherokee during that long and treacherous journey? They were brave and listened to the government, but they relieved unproductive land and lost their tribal land. The white settlers were already emigrating to the Union, or America. The East coast was burdened with new settlers and becoming vastly populated. President Andrew Jackson and the government had to find a way to move people to the West to make room. President Andrew Ja...
  • Georgia Law Over The Cherokee Nation
    6,053 words
    The Removal of the Cherokee The tragedy of the Cherokee nation has haunted the legacy of Andrew Jackson's Presidency. The events that transpired after the implementation of his Indian policy are indeed heinous and continually pose questions of morality for all generations. Ancient Native American tribes were forced from their ancestral homes in an effort to increase the aggressive expansion of white settlers during the early years of the United States. The most notable removal came after the Ind...
  • Removal Of The Cherokee Indians
    3,445 words
    The Trail Where They Cried nu na hi du na tlo hi lu i "There were ten million Native Americans on this continent when the first non-Indians arrived. Over the next 300 years, 90% of all Native American original population was either wiped out by disease, famine, or warfare imported by the whites". By 1840 all the eastern tribes had been subdued, annihilated or forcibly removed to Indian Territory west of the Mississippi. The discovery of the New World by European explorers caused endless problems...
  • Cherokee's Removal From Their Homeland
    1,755 words
    The years 1838 and 1839 were not pleasant ones for the Cherokee Indians, a tribe who had, before this date, been settled in the Southeast, and were forcibly removed and made to travel West beyond the Mississippi River during these years. The difficult and heart-wrenching journey that they endured, known as The Trail of Tears, paints a picture of the conflicts between the Native Americans and white settlers at this time and was meant as a solution to these irresolvable differences. Many of the ha...
  • Their Land Onto The Indian Territory
    1,263 words
    America Expansion Of 1700'S America Expansion Of 1700'S Essay, Research Paper United States Expansionism: 1790's- 1860's The major American aspiration during the 1790's through the 1860's was westward expansion. Americans looked to the western lands as an opportunity for large amounts of free land, for growth of industry, and manifest destiny. This hunger for more wealth and property, led Americans conquer lands that were rightfully someone else's. Manifest destiny and westward expansion brought...

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