You are welcome to search the collection of free essays and research papers. Thousands of coursework topics are available. Buy unique, original custom papers from our essay writing service.

37 results found, view free essays on page:

  • Chinese Exclusion Act 1882
    658 words
    Chinese Exclusion Act 1882 The Chinese Exclusion Act was passed in 1882. The Chinese Exclusion Act was not passed because of fear of increasing population the United States. It was passed because of racism. It was also passed because Americans were scared of losing their jobs. Chinese were sought for jobs in mines and railroads. Racial tensions increased as more and more Chinese emigrated, occupied jobs, and created competition for jobs. The Chinese came to America in search of opportunities. Ot...
  • Chinese Exclusion Act And The Gentleman's Agreement
    523 words
    There were a very large number of local, state, and federal laws that were specifically aimed at disrupting the flow of Chinese and Japanese immigrants to the United States. Two of the major laws were the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and the 1907-1908 Gentleman's Agreement. Although the laws had some differences, they were quite similar and had similar impacts on the immigrant population. The 1882, Congress enacted the Chinese Exclusion Act, which outlawed Chinese immigration. It also explicitly d...
  • Most Employers Of Chinese Immigrants
    1,210 words
    In the eyes of the early American colonists and the founders of the Constitution, the United States was to represent the ideals of acceptance and tolerance to those of all walks of life. When the immigration rush began in the mid-1800's, America proved to be everything but that. The millions of immigrants would soon realize the meaning of hardship and rejection as newcomers, as they attempted to assimilate into American culture. For countless immigrants, the struggle to arrive in America was riv...
  • Chinese Prostitution
    1,519 words
    In 1850, only 7 Chinese women were in San Francisco compared to the 4,018 Chinese men. These lows numbers could " ve been because Chinese men were afraid to bring their wives and raise families in a place full of racial violence. The growing anti-Chinese sentiment and few labor opportunities reduced the chances for entry of Chinese women. The few women in San Francisco's Chinatown basically turned Chinatown into a bachelor's society. Many men went to brothel houses to release their sexual tensio...
  • Regulations And Restriction To Chinese Immigration
    390 words
    Early immigration to Canada was generated by a network of emigration agents who were salesman who advertised to Canadas attractions to prospected immigrants. They targeted wealthy farmers, agricultural laborers and female domestics, preferably from Great Britain, the United States and Northern Europe. Canadas first immigration legislation, the Immigration Act of 1869 reflected the laissez-faire philosophy of the time by not saying which classes of immigrants should be admitted but, merely that t...
  • First Chinese Immigrants
    517 words
    Chinese Immigration to North America This essay will show how and why the first Chinese immigrants came to North America, the events that occured in those times, and the contrast between how the first Chinese Canadians and the Chinese of today have been treated. The first immigrants that came from China to Canada began to come soon after the American Revolutionary War. There were immigrants before them, but very, very few. Around 1790, students, merchants, and sailors began to come to America an...
  • Waves Of Chinese Immigrants To America
    1,522 words
    Chinese Immigration It happens everyday before our very eyes. Occurring since long before we can remember, immigration has now become a common place idea. People move because of various reasons such as opportunity, persecution, or just plain wanting a new life. The reasons for immigration are important, as well are the results that arise from that change in location. The United States is widely known to harvest the most immigrants from around the world, but more specifically, the immigration of ...
  • Chinese Exclusion Act Of 1882
    1,404 words
    (TITLE) Chinese Immigration into the United States: From Railroad Worker to Businessman Table of Contents Body... pages 3-7 Important Laws and Decisions... pages 8-10 References... page 11 Immigration into the United States by persons from foreign nations is not as it used to be. The immigration system which exists today has evolved from many regulations, restrictions and quotas. The Chinese people came from their country in the mid 1860's mostly as rail workers. Today most come as businessmen a...
  • Majority Of Chinese Immigrants
    498 words
    Chinese Immigration In 1784, the United States began relations with China when the American trading ship Empress of China arrived in Canton, China from New York, thus welcoming the opening of China Trade. Significant Chinese immigration began with the California gold rush in 1849, and continued throughout the nineteenth century as thousands of Chinese emigrated to the United States due to economic dislocation in China, when millions of peasants were forced off the land in search of food and work...
  • Prospective Chinese Immigrants At Angel Island
    3,682 words
    Interrogations of Chinese Immigrants at Angel Island Like Ellis Island in New York Harbor, Angel Island in San Francisco Bay was an entry point for immigrants in the early 20th century. The Angel Island immigration station processed small numbers of immigrants from Japan, Italy, and other parts of the world and was the key place of interrogation and detention for immigrants from China ("Angel Island Over View, CD-ROM). Angel Island in 1910 to enforce the Chinese Exclusion Act passed in 1882 and ...
  • Chinese Immigration Act
    697 words
    In the 1850's the early immigrants to Canada suffered also of ethnic prejudice and were considered unfit for full citizenship. Even though residents of BC considered the Chinese unassailable under any circumstances, they tolerated them because the Chinese were a useful form of cheap labor. But in 1885 the Canadian government imposed a head tax to decrease the Chinese immigration to Canada, since the construction of the CPR was over. To be admitted into Canada, Chinese immigrants had to pay an $1...
  • Angel Island Most Immigrants
    332 words
    Michael GillaspieAmerican History Ms. Rankin 15 December 2003 Chinese Immigration In many aspects, the motivations for the Chinese to come to the United States are similar to those of most immigrants. Some came to 'The Gold Mountain,' and others came to the United States to seek better economic opportunity. Yet there were others that were compelled to leave China either as contract laborers or refugees. The Chinese brought with them their language, culture, social institutions, and customs. Over...
  • Angel Island The Majority Of Chinese Immigrants
    1,832 words
    Chinese Immigration Every person who lives in America is either an immigrant or a descendant of an immigrant. Though we may not consider it, it is a fact that everyone here has come from some other place. The majority of immigrants have come to America voluntarily. Seeking a change they envisioned America as country thriving with different opportunities. For the immigrants it was a chance at a better life, not only for themselves, but for their children. It is estimated that over sixty million p...
  • Chinese Immigrants
    449 words
    Chinese Immigrants lived in really poor conditions. Small rooms were packed full of 20 to 30 immigrants. Rats and mice were everywhere, and catching diseases were often and deadly. Since there were no good vaccinations, many died from diseases caught from their workers. Sometimes the dirt would be inches high. Living in these conditions would be very harsh, yet still more and more immigrants from China came to mine and work on the railroad. The Chinese played a very important, yet dangerous job ...
  • New Immigration The Population Of The Chinese
    2,569 words
    Andrew Brennan The Chinese Ethnic Group Introduction The ethnic group that I have selected to discuss in this term paper is that of the Chinese. In this paper I will present information on the Asian American identity, Chinese immigration and geographical concentration as well as population growth and other aspect all in the hope to explain the Chinese diverse and growing presence here in the United States. Asian American Identity The Asian American population is booming. Between 1980 and 1990 th...
  • Immigration Of Chinese Into America
    1,590 words
    Chinese Immigration into America Surprisingly, Asian Americans have been in America for over 150 years. They are as diverse as the immigrants from Europe, ranging from China, Japan, Korea, Cambodia, Korea, Philippines, India, Vietnam, and Laos. (Takaki, page 8) When many people think of American Immigrants, Asians are on the last of their lists. In The Uprooted, Harvard historian, Oscar Handling, prize winning book with the subtitle 'the Epic Story of the Great Migrations that Made the American ...
  • History Of Chinese Immigration In Vancouver
    3,835 words
    Immigration Into Canada Abstract This paper is concerned with the recent wave of Hong Kong immigrants into Vancouver. The stage is set for this discussion by first explaining some background behind Canadian immigration policy and then discussing the history of Chinese immigrants in Vancouver. From these discussions we are informed that Canadian immigration policy was historically ethnocentric and only began to change in the late 1960's. It was at this point that we see a more multicultural group...
  • Families Of Chinese Immigrants
    1,955 words
    There have been people from many different countries, nations, and religions who have decided to migrate from other places to the United States throughout history. But perhaps none have come in more mass than the Chinese. With declining economic and political conditions at home, many literally saw coming to the United States as a "golden" opportunity. Once arriving here though, many found out it wasn't as opportune as they thought. The immigration of Asians to America was a big part of American ...
  • Immigration Station On Angel Island
    438 words
    It is the idea that the process of urbanizing the Pacific Northwest was a slow and steady process. Solitary pioneers settled into an area, followed by a larger number of farmers, preachers and businessmen. As time progressed this network of people eventually grew from a small town into an urban city. Some historians are finding that this was not always the case; in some cases it is the city that precedes the settlers. The Chinese immigrants quickly became an integral part of the workforce, being...
  • Chinese Immigrants And Black Migrants
    1,115 words
    Americanization of Migrants and Immigrants American history can be viewed through many eyes, each offering a diverse analysis of Americanization. I have found W.E.B. Du Bois's concept of double consciousness applies to both foreign born immigrants and black migrants. By examining "Of Our Spiritual Strivings" by W.E.B. Du Bois and historical writings concerning Chinese immigration I will investigate the forces which have shaped the double consciousness of both black migrants and Chinese immigrant...

37 results found, view free essays on page: