You are welcome to search the collection of free essays and research papers. Thousands of coursework topics are available. Buy unique, original custom papers from our essay writing service.

16 results found, view free essays on page:

  • Right Of Privacy From The Constitution
    926 words
    The Right to Privacy by Robert Bork. Robert Bork's The Right of Privacy examined the landmark case Griswald vs. Connecticut. Bork's 'original ist' view proclaimed that Justice Douglas erroneously interpreted the right of privacy from the Constitution. Theoriginalist view is that judges must strictly adhere to the language of the Constitution, thus people do not have a general right to privacy because it was never actually written into the Constitution. This view severely restricts judges in deal...
  • Only Source Of Government Power
    1,186 words
    Essay Paper #3 A) The "Social Contract" was a theory written in the 17th and 18th century. This theory argued four important main points. These main points said that the state existed to serve the will of the people, that people were the only source of government power, that the people were free to withhold power of the government, but also had the ability to give power to the government, and finally it stated that the ideas in this document limited government, individual rights, and popular sov...
  • Constitution's Lack Of Protection Of Individual Rights
    828 words
    Ratificating the constitution The US Constitution was written and ratified in 1787. It is over 200 years old. People think that this document has always been honored, but this is not true. There were many people who supported this Constitution who they were called the Federalists and people who opposed it who were called the Antifederalists. Ratification of this Constitution involved many arguments in which the Antifederalists feared an absolute power and a too powerful government. They were fea...
  • Abortion As A Fundamental Constitution Right
    1,945 words
    Abortion: Life or Death, Who chooses During the past quarter century, abortion has joined race and war as one of the most debatable subject of controversy in the United States. It discusses human interaction where ethics, emotions and law come together. Abortion poses a moral, social and medical dilemma that faces many individuals to create a emotional and violent atmosphere. There are many points of view toward abortion but the only two fine distinctions are "pro-choice" and "pro-life". A pro- ...
  • Abortion As A Fundamental Constitutional Right
    1,177 words
    Abortion: Life or Death Many people believe abortion is purely a moral issue, but it is also a constitutional issue. It is a woman's right to choose what she does with her own body, and it should not be altered or influenced by anyone else. This right is guaranteed by the ninth amendment, which contains the right to privacy. The ninth amendment states: " The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people". This right ...
  • Original Text Of The Constitution Without Interpretation
    2,312 words
    Constitutional Interpretation The problem of interpreting the Constitution and framer's intent is a constantly permeating and troublesome question in the minds of Supreme Court Justices, judges, prominent politicians, and policy makers alike. It is a problem that has been pondered for years and years in the courtrooms and on paper with no real conclusion. One such essay arguing this dilemma is "How Not to Read the Constitution" by Laurence H. Tribe and Michael C. Dorf, who explore the questions ...
  • Entrenchment Of Rights In The Canadian Constitution
    1,379 words
    BACKGROUND OF THE BILL OF RIGHTS The United States Bill of Rights came into being as a result of a promise made by the Fathers of Confederation to the states during the struggle for ratification of the Constitution in 1787-88. A great number of the states made as a condition for their ratification, the addition of amendments, which would guarantee citizens protection of their rights against the central government. Thus, we have a rather interesting situation in which the entrenchment of a bill o...
  • First State Bill Of Rights
    348 words
    The Bill of Rights Bill of Rights The first ten amendments to the US constitution are called the Bill of Rights because they provide basic legal protection for individual rights. The terms also applied to the English Bill of Rights of 1689 and the Canadian Bill of Rights 1960, and to similar guarantees in the constitutions of the American states. From the perspective of two centuries, it can be said that Madison chose well among they pyramid of proposal sin the state. he included all the great r...
  • Abortion As A Fundamental Constitution Right
    906 words
    During the past quarter century, abortion has joined race and war as one of the most popular subjects of controversy in the United States. Abortion poses a moral, social and medical dilemma that challenges the way many of us think and feel. There are many points of view toward abortion but the only two fine distinctions are 'pro-choice' and 'pro-life'. A pro-choicer would feel that the decision to abort a pregnancy is that of the mothers and the state has no right to interfere. A pro-lifer would...
  • Better People In The Government
    526 words
    The Constitution The Constitution of the United States was written as a set of rules for this country. Many of the 'rules' have helped the country stay in order, but a great many have been abused and taken out of context. Three provisions in the Constitution that are important to my individual rights and liberties are freedom of speech, freedom to vote, and that all people should be treated equally. These rights represent what is important to me and what I believe in. Freedom of speech is an imp...
  • U.S. Constitution
    435 words
    There are many different ways in which the Enlightenment affected the Declaration of Independence and the U. S Constitution. One way was the by the idea of a Social Contract; an agreement by which human beings are said to have abandoned the 'state of nature' in order to form the society in which they now live. HOBBES, LOCKE, and J.J. ROUSSEAU each developed differing versions of the social contract, but all agreed that certain freedoms had been surrendered for society's protection and that the g...
  • Warrant Before The Surgical Procedure
    986 words
    No Butts About It Bruce Robert Nelson's conviction ought to be overturned. He ought to have maintained a civil suit against the Hennepin County Sheriff and the Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis for violation of his federal constitutional rights. These rights include, inter alia, his rights against illegal search and seizure of the drugs from inside his body, and violation of his rights against self incrimination. These rights are granted to every American resident and citizen includi...
  • Strong Central Government And Weak State Governments
    407 words
    The Ratification of the Constitution In 1787, the Constitution was created to replace the Articles of Confederation, because it was felt that the Articles weren't sufficient for running the country. However, the Constitution was not very well liked by everyone. The constitution created was very much liked by the majority of the country. This included the farmers, the merchants, the mechanics, and other of the common people. However, there were those who were very important people in the revoluti...
  • Anti Federalist
    551 words
    Anti-Federalists were people who opposed the ratification of the Constitution. They believed strongly that the Constitution would not be able toe maintain a system of republican government because the Federalists were proposing a government that was the opposite of what they believed in. Anti-Federalists believed that the greatest power should be placed in the legislature, composed of representatives elected by the people of the community. Although, this governing would not work because it was m...
  • Historic Record Of Privacy Protection
    6,211 words
    PROBLEM AREA II: RIGHT OF PRIVACY The Right to Be Left Alone: An Examination of the Right of Privacy Prepared for Submission to the 1999 National Debate Topic Selection Committee by Cindi Timmons Colleyville Heritage HS Colleyville, Texas and Aaron Timmons Greenhill School Dallas, Texas The Right to Be Left Alone: An Examination of the Right of Privacy The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be viol...
  • Bill Of Rights In The Australian Constitution
    2,207 words
    The Australian Constitution came into force in 1901 with the federation of the separate state colonies into the Commonwealth of Australia. With its introduction, the Constitution was heralded as 'the most magnificent Constitution into which the chosen representatives of a free and enlightened people have ever breathed the life of popular sentiment and national hope', by Charles Kingston (Irving 2001). The Australian Constitution has remained relatively untouched since it came into effect, from 4...

16 results found, view free essays on page: