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  • Classical Studio Films
    491 words
    The Hollywood studio system developed as an orgizational response to the introduction and refinement of the full-length feature film. Distinguished by high degrees of specialization and vertical integration, the studio system differed from the old structure and methods of movie production. The increase in running time and the strong emphasis on narrative structure of the feature film strained the capacities of the early film industry to deal with its new aesthetic dimensions at a time of rapid g...
  • Lang's Films
    3,726 words
    Overview Fritz Lang (1890-1976), an Austrian-born film director, was one of the commanding figures of German and American cinema. In a career spanning over four decades, he pioneered entire new genres and modes of cinematic expression. From the distortions of German Expressionism to the malignant brooding of American film noir, Lang's films depicted a fatalistic universe where all possibilities are predetermined. Fascinated by the psychology of violence, his movies were populated by murderers, t...
  • Universal Film Manufacturing Company
    2,512 words
    The story of Universal studios begins with Carl Laemmle, who immigrated to America from his native Germany in 1884 at age 17. He traveled around the country, taking various jobs, until he opened his first nickelodeon in Chicago in 1906. A second operation quickly followed, and the following year he started the Laemmle Film Exchange, which he soon developed into one of the major film distributors in the country. In 1909 he began producing films with his Independent Motion Picture Company of Ameri...
  • Hollywood Film Companies
    2,950 words
    Film History In the Silent Era: The Worker Management Techniques and Capitalist Vertical Integration Within Hollywood By Phil Beauregard The film industry would have never taken the direction it did without the incorporation of certain worker management techniques and capitalist vertical integration pioneered by the founders of Hollywood. The methods of operation that Hollywood established in the realms of production, manufacturing, exhibition and distribution of film has shaped the face of the ...
  • Universal's Flash Gordon Serials
    3,122 words
    All but forgotten today, except by nostalgia buffs, movie serials were at one time one of the most popular pure entertainment forms in Hollywood and one of the most reliable for the studios in terms of making money, as well as a unique form of the filmmaker's art. From their beginnings in 1912, to the release of the last of the serials in 1956, serials were also one of the formative entertainment experiences for two generations of Americans, ending with the postwar baby boom. Essentially, the se...
  • Several Pieces Of Merchandise For The Film
    1,616 words
    " I like ideas, especially movie ideas, that you can hold in your hand. If a person can tell me the idea in twenty-five words or less, its going to make a pretty good movie". Steven Spielberg. ' For this essay I intend to discuss how Hollywood as an industry has used the marketing strategies of blockbuster films to significant advantage in film merchandising. Along with the use of mass merchandising as a form of marketing films, with the hope of creating awareness among the public. As merchandis...
  • Film Production In The Majors
    2,375 words
    Outline the main changes the paramount decree effected on the structure of the American film industry and discuss the measures the ex-studios took to remain in control of the film market. The period of the 1920's to 1950's where known as the studio era in Hollywood. A few major companies monopolized the industry through vertical integration when the film companies controlled all production distribution and exhibition. The majors determined which movies were shown in which theatres, choosing thei...
  • Film Appearances In The 1960's Keaton
    851 words
    Returning to his love of trains gave Keaton the greatest prop of all for his masterpiece, "The General" (1926). Uncompromising as ever, he refused to use a model for the film's climax, shooting instead (at the unheard of cost of $42,000 for the single take) a real train crashing through a burning bridge, the frame including men on horseback moving on the river bank as proof it was no trick of the camera. Keaton mined history books obtaining. ".. the authenticity and the unassumingly correct comp...
  • First Immense Achievement Of Documentary Film
    697 words
    The Frenchman, Louis Lumiere is considered to be the founder of what is now considered by everyone to be as movie. He was one of the first who invented the motion picture camera in 1895. Though he had several competitors, like an American scientist Thomas Alva Edison, his suitcase-sized multifunctional device served as a camera, film-processing unit, and a projector all in one. Though Edison camera was bulky and not portable, it can be claimed that the history of American film started from his i...
  • Mgm Film And Television Production And Distribution
    2,781 words
    The history of the illustrious film studio Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, more commonly known as MGM, begins with Marcus Loew, a first-generation American and son of Austrian immigrants, who began purchasing penny arcades in 1905 with his business partner, Adolph Zukor. They were soon buying up motion-picture theaters, and by 1912, when Zukor struck out to form the production company Famous Players (which eventually became Paramount), Loew had his own business, Loew's Theatrical Enterprises, which owned h...
  • Wilder Directed Ten Films At Paramount
    3,066 words
    The history of Paramount Pictures begins in Hungary in 1873, with the birth of Adolf Zukor. He immigrated to the United States as a teenager in 1888, and by the turn of the century was a successful Chicago furrier. Recognizing a new market, he entered the business of penny arcades at the age of 30; in 1905, he became business partners with Marcus Loew, who acquired a chain of nickelodeons across the country. Together they made the transition to motion-picture theaters, with Zukor serving as trea...
  • 20th Century Fox With A Contract
    643 words
    Monroe, Marilyn (1926-1962), American motion-picture actor, who became the most famous international sex symbol of the 20th century. Born Norma Jean Mortenson in Los Angeles, the daughter of an emotionally unstable mother, she spent a troubled childhood in foster homes and orphanages and at the age of 16 entered into an ill-fated marriage. In 1944, while working in a defense plant, she was noticed by a United States Army photographer who induced her to pose for posters for the troops. Instantly ...
  • Films With Warner Features
    2,791 words
    The Warner family immigrated from Poland to Baltimore in 1883 and for several years traveled around the United States and Canada before finally settling in Youngstown, Ohio. Of the twelve children, Harry was born in Poland in 1881; Jack, the youngest, was born in London, Ontario, in 1892. In 1903 the family purchased the 90-seat Cascade Theatre, a nickelodeon in Newcastle, Pennsylvania (where Jack sang for the audience during intermissions). By 1905, Jack, Harry, and brothers Albert and Sam were...
  • Big Five Each Studio
    1,124 words
    Hollywood in the 1930's The advent of sound into motion pictures during the late 1920's consolidated the workings of the American film industry into what has been labeled the studio system. Through the 1930's and 1940's, under an arrangement known as "vertical integration", eight companies dominated not only the making of narrative feature films, but also their international distribution and in many cases their national and even international exhibition in theaters. Five corporations-Paramount, ...
  • Just Movie Studios Like Warner Brothers
    2,225 words
    Earning its spot on the list of the major studios right from the start, Warner Brothers began a legacy that has remained strong for over eighty years. Despite the volatile relationship that existed between Jack, Sam, Harry and Albert Warner, they still managed to produce some of the greatest movies in the history of film (Seeing Stars 1). It is interesting to trace the evolution of the studio throughout the years, seeing the changing movie styles and different types of movie stars. In the follow...

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