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  • Rational Type Of Knowledge In One's Life
    2,063 words
    AmPhronesis According to Aristotle and his theories, there are two basic types of intellectual virtues by which we live our lives. The two intellectual virtues that he speaks of are wisdom and phronesis. Wisdom is a virtue that we are able to gain and increase throughout our lives through experience and time. Of the two different intellectual virtues that Aristotle speaks of, wisdom is more of a scientific knowledge, it is the type of knowledge that would be expected of an intellect. While phron...
  • Suffering In Buddhist Terms
    2,567 words
    Q 2. Outline and discuss the four noble truths: is the Buddhist view of existence optimistic or pessimistic? The question of the Buddhist view of existence being optimistic or pessimistic is one which is many have an opinion on. It could be said that the four noble truths provide the views of the Buddha in the way that life is led and more importantly, should be led. Certainly, the end goal is clearly optimistic, the attainment of spiritual enlightenment, or nirvana. However, the Buddhist view o...
  • Brave New World Life
    10,726 words
    BRAVE NEW WORLD? A Defence Of Paradise-Engineering Brave New World (1932) is one of the most bewitching and insidious works of literature ever written. An exaggeration? Tragically, no. Brave New World has come to serve as the false symbol for any regime of universal happiness. For sure, Huxley was writing a satirical piece of fiction, not scientific prophecy. Hence to treat his masterpiece as ill-conceived futurology rather than a work of great literature might seem to miss the point. Yet the kn...
  • Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas
    1,137 words
    The Ones Who Stay At Omelas Utopia is any state, condition, or place of ideal perfection. In Ursula Le Guin's short story 'The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas' the city of Omelas is described as a utopia. 'The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas' presents a challenge of conscience for anyone who chooses to live in Omelas. Omelas is described by the narrator as the story begins. The city appears to be very likable. At times the narrator does not know the truth and therefore guesses what could be, prese...
  • Just Two Tear Drops
    312 words
    The shiny little rain drops brightened up the sky, Falling one after the other in every little corner of the street, Dressed in a sweet pink raincoat, came a little girl, With tears falling down her pale little cheeks, A tear for sadness and a tear for joy, Two tear drops was what I saw that pouring night. I remember, I remember, The house where I was born, All those treasured memories now a part of my past, I shed a tear of pain and sorrow for the past, And a tear of happiness and fortune for t...
  • Randomness Of Human Thought
    417 words
    Notes to Myself: Facades Sometimes mankind has to ask the question 'what is it that makes up the actions and determines the type of interaction that we display when around other people?' Notes to Myself is the contemporary world's way of questioning the value of putting on facades. The novel also questions things we know as 'trivial's uch as watching a cat sleep on our belly or staring at clouds in the sky. The author used an interesting form for writing his collection, omitting page numbers and...
  • Deal With The Social Virtues
    1,732 words
    Social Virtues What is being Social, and what virtues do you need to possess to become sociable Throughout your life you are going to being interacting, and communicating with just about everyone who is living around you and working with you. In my paper I am going to be talking about some of the major virtues you will need to acquire to become a ethically wise and social person according to the three leading ethical philosophers; Aristotle, Kant, and Mills. I chose this topic because I think on...
  • Plato Believes Virtue Suffices For Happiness
    1,225 words
    Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Nietzsche all had their own ideas for which one could reach happiness in his / her life. All have similarities in there reasoning except Nietzshe, who contradicts the others entirely. Plato states that to understand virtue is happiness. In turn virtue suffices for happiness and is necessary. Also he intuits that human reasoning prevails over spirited element or a person's appetite. Aristotle's arguments relate with Plato, but he builds more to it and finds his ow...
  • Wendell Steavenson
    1,041 words
    Guns, roses and vodka Stories I Stole Wendell SteavensonAtlantic Books 14.99, pp 320 When Wendell Steavenson was living in Georgia, she kept a collector's list of 'LAOs' - large abandoned objects. The Caucasus is littered with them: rusting tank hulls, gutted apartment blocks, the rustbelt of gigantic ruined factories that surrounds most cities. The biggest LAO is the late Soviet Union itself. Nobody wants to re-animate it. But nobody realised what the price of junking it would be. A few decades...
  • Final End To Human Life
    1,859 words
    Let us again return to the good we are seeking, and ask what it can be. It seems different in different actions and arts; it is different in medicine, in strategy, and in the other arts likewise. What then is the good of each? Surely that for whose sake everything else is done. In medicine this is health, in strategy victory, in architecture a house, in any other sphere something else, and in every action and pursuit the end; for it is for the sake of this that all men do whatever else they do. ...
  • Aristotle's Definition Of Happiness
    671 words
    Aristotle: Highest End To All Things Is Aristotle: Highest End To All Things Is Happiness Aristotle argues things people do aims at some end or end. The highest end to all of these things is attaining happiness. I maintain that it is impossible for a human being to be happy according to Aristotle's definition due to the fact that he sets strict conditions of perfect virtue thus happiness. Aristotle suggests that happiness is not a state, but rather we count happiness as an activity. He argues th...

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