You are welcome to search the collection of free essays and research papers. Thousands of coursework topics are available. Buy unique, original custom papers from our essay writing service.

9 results found, view free essays on page:

  • Believer In Miracles
    974 words
    In David Hume's paper "Of Miracles", Hume presents a various number of arguments concerning why people ought not to believe in any miracles. Hume does not think that miracles do not exist it is just that we should not believe in them because they have no rational background. One of his arguments is just by definition miracles are unbelievable. And have no rational means in believing miracles. Another argument is that most miracles tend to come from uncivilized countries and the witnesses typical...
  • Hume In My Mind
    608 words
    Hume's Mind Game Travis Slabyphil-101 Alex Clarkson 2-17-97 The human mind is a very intricate machine. There have been many people that have attempted, and failed, to explain how the human mind operates. After reading Hume, I was in agreement with a lot of what he was explaining. Hume, in my mind, has come the closest to uncovering the minds operations. Robert Hume dealt with a lot of what Decarte talked about in his writings. The difference between Decarte and Hume is that Hume 'ironed out' a ...
  • My Opinion Of Hume's Philosophy
    1,154 words
    David Hume David Hume was born on May 7, 1711 in Edinburgh, Scotland, into a middle class family. His father died while he was young and left him with wage of 50 pounds a year. When he was twelve years old he went to Edinburgh University but dropped out three years later without receiving a degree. Hume had a plan to be a "literary hero" instead of practicing law like he was supposed to do, so he spent the next three years of his life reading Greek and Roman classics. In 1729 he already had a pl...
  • Hume On Human Being And Human Knowledge
    863 words
    Hume on Human Being and Human Knowledge Hume is an empiricist and a skeptic. He develops a philosophy that is generally approached in a manner as that of a scientist and therefore he thinks that he can come up with a law for human understanding. Hume investigates the understanding as an empiricist to try and understand the origins of human ideas. Empiricism is the notion that all knowledge comes from experience. Skepticism is the practice of not believing things in nature a priori, but instead i...
  • Hume Believes
    637 words
    Pragmatism, Empiricism and David Hume Pragmatism is based on the philosophy that ideas must be tested and re-tested, that experiences dictate reality. Pragmatists also believe in no absolute truths or values existing. David Hume argues that, "no proof can be derived from any fact, of which we are so intimately conscious; nor is there anything of which we can be certain, if we doubt this" (Treatise 2645). Hume's empiricist ideals were roots to early pragmatic thought, by way of the theory that, i...
  • Own Existence
    1,241 words
    The ultimate question that Hume seems to be seeking an answer to is that of why is that we believe what we believe. For most of us the answer is grounded in our own personal experiences and can in no way be justified by a common or worldly assumption. Our pasts, according to Hume, are reliant on some truths which we have justified according to reason, but in being a skeptic reason is hardly a solution for anything concerning our past, present or future. Our reasoning according to causality is sl...
  • Hume's Response To The Conflict In Question
    1,242 words
    INTRODUCTION In this essay I will be discussing a very important conflict that Hume reflects in the conclusion of Book I, A Treatise of Human Nature. The thesis of this essay is to analyze the "conflict" between causal reasoning and the continued existence of external objects. Now, to be more specific I should say that I am inclining on Hume's side about the conflict being real for same thing cannot exist at one time and again at a later time, and also in between or at the same time. To summariz...
  • Descartes And Hume
    1,565 words
    Rationalism and Empiricism are most likely the two most famous and intriguing schools of philosophy. The two schools deal specifically with epistemology, or, the origin of knowledge. Although not completely opposite, they are often considered so, and are seen as the "Jordan vs. Bird" of the philosophy world. The origins of rationalism and empiricism can be traced back to the 17th century, when many important advancements were made in scientific fields such as astronomy and mechanics. These advan...
  • Hume's View Of Miracles
    1,001 words
    Hume On Miracles It is evident in David Hume's writing of "An Equity Concerning Human Understanding" that he does not believe that miracles take place. Hume is a man of logic, who believes in experience over knowledge. Of course it is hard for such a man to believe in extraordinary claims without being there to witness them. Especially when such events require a lot of faith. In order for an event to be deemed a miracle, it must disobey the laws of nature. However, it is these same laws that dis...

9 results found, view free essays on page: