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  • Indian's Guns
    758 words
    Wounded Knee was a terrible event in US history. It showed how the US government didn't understand the Native Americans and treated them badly and unfairly. Big Foot was the chief of a subtribe of the Lakota called Miniconjou. He was very old and had pneumonia. He was taking his tribe to the Pine Ridge Reservation in south-western South Dakota. Most of the women and children in Big Foot's tribe were family members of the warriors who had died in the Plains wars. The Indians had agreed to live on...
  • 1890 The Ghost Dance Cult
    442 words
    The Ghost Dance Cult The Ghost Dance Cult was a religous movement among Native Americans during the late 1800's in the far west. It offered the Indians hope of spiritual renewal and a return to their old way of living. The religion promised that dead Indian ancestors and game animals would comeback to life. It was first adopted by Indians in what is now the state of Nevada in the late 1860's. The religion was revived in 1889 by several different Californian tribes. By 1890 The Ghost Dance Cult w...
  • Pima Tribe And The Maricopa Tribe
    926 words
    The Southwest Region Native American tribe that is discussed in the following focuses on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. The Pima-Maricopa Indians have struggled and endured a constant hardship of events in its background, history, and location. Thomas Dobyns, the author of The Pima and Maricopa stated, they have suffered through their worst years at the hands of ruthless investors and land grabbers, and the fight to undo the damage will never end. Descendants of the regions origi...
  • Dances With Wolves And The Lady
    635 words
    Dances with Wolves Lt. John Dunbar was lying on a hospital bed, leg totally mutilated. Barely conscious, the man over heard the surgeon say he could not amputate this mans leg as tired as he was. Dunbar didnt like what he heard, so when the surgeons left, he grabbed his boat, and he slowly slid the boat up his mutilated foot biting on a stick to relive the massive pain. He returned to the battlefield, with only one thing on his mind, suicide. So, he took a horse, and rode it directly in front of...
  • American Indian Chief Of The Sauk Tribe
    1,145 words
    After the American Revolution the new United States government hoped to maintain peace with the Indians on the frontier. But as settlers continued to migrate westward they made settlements on Indian lands and demanded and received protection by the Army. Tecumseh, a Shawnee chief, organized several tribes to oppose further ceding of Indian lands. But they were defeated in 1811 by Gen. William Henry Harrison at the battle of Tippecanoe. During the War of 1812 many of the Indians again sided with ...
  • Cherokee Indian Tribes
    2,938 words
    INTRODUCTION On May 26, 1830, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed by the Twenty-First Congress of the United states of America. After four months of strong debate, Andrew Jackson signed the bill into law. Land greed was a big reason for the federal government's position on Indian removal. This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentality that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. This period of forcible removal first started with the Cherokee Indians in the...
  • Tribe My Great Grandfather
    553 words
    The experiment calls for us to trace our ancestry in any manner possible and trace where we as an ethnicity came from. I decided to concentrate on my mothers's ide of the family because it is more interesting and something other members in my family have already started to investigate. I choose not to concentrate on my fathers's ide because being Mexican is the general term people associate me with. I wanted to elaborate on the other part of my culture, being Native American. From the stories my...
  • Large Role In Tecumseh's Confederation
    1,723 words
    Tecumseh was a very significant Native American who gave his life for what he believed. He knew that the Americans were a tremendous threat to all Indian tribes, and realized that the Indians would be destroyed one by one if not united. Tecumseh created a confederation of thirty-two tribes in hopes that the Americans would recognize their borders and thus put a halt to westward expansion. His confederation may have succeeded if it were not for the mistakes made by his brother, Laulewasika, the A...
  • Culture Of The Indian Tribes
    2,229 words
    Native Americans The issue is whether different ethnic groups can preserve their culture in a pluralistic society, and the answer depends on what amount of culture is taken into effect and which ethnic group is being considered. The Native American population remains one of the most invisible of all American minority groups for the country, for much of the population has been relegated to reservations on land far from the majority of urban society. On these reservations, the native people have b...
  • Ponee And Other Savage Indians
    536 words
    Through the eyes of the narrator, John Dunbar, we experience the majesty and magnitude of the American frontier, and the complexity of the relationship between the whiteman' and the Indian'. When John Dunbar met the Indians, he was scared because of the stereotype set by the Ponee and other savage Indians. The Indians had a lot of weird traditions. One of Dunbar's experiences was when they finished the buffalo hunt, they took the heart out, which was still warm, and offered it to Dunbar. This wa...
  • Ghost Dance Movement
    603 words
    The Ghost Dance In January 1889, Wovoka, a Paiute Indian, had a revelation during a total eclipse of the sun. It was the genesis of a religious movement that would become known as the Ghost Dance. It was this dance that the Indians believed would reunite them with friends and relatives in the ghost world. The legend states that after prayer and ceremony, the earth would shatter and let forth a great flood that would drown all the whites and enemy Indians, leaving the earth untouched and as it wa...
  • Choctaw Indians The Choctaw Indians
    336 words
    The Choctaw Indians The Choctaw Indians is a tribe of Muskogean stock. The Choctaws were once part of a larger tribe that included the Greeks and Seminoles and are considered one of the five civilized tribes (Cherokees, Greeks, Choctaws, Seminoles, and Chickasaws). At one time Choctaw territory extended from Mississippi to Georgia, but by the time Europeans began to arrive in North America they were primarily in Mississippi and Louisiana. The Choctaw Indians were into cultivation, they hunted an...
  • Nuclear Waste Facility On Tribal Land Indians
    2,463 words
    Tribal Affiliations The injustices that happened long ago are still not fixed and need to be, because they are visible everyday through the hardships these people face. Introduction Ever since Europeans discovered America Native Americans began losing their land progressively for the next couple of hundred years following the settlement of the first Europeans. What was once a country that was dominated by the inhabitancy of Native Americans, the United States is no longer the home it once was. N...
  • Famous Indians From The Seneca Tribe
    1,255 words
    ALLIES AND ENEMIES Seneca are among the most respected and feared. The Seneca are culturally similar to their Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, an Mohawk confederates. The five tribes were known as the Five Nations or the League of Five Nations. Sometime between 1715 and 1722 the Tuscaroras from North Carolina joined the confederacy and changed the name to the Six Nations. In their relations with white settlers the Seneca played the role of an independent power and were this way from the very start. Dur...
  • State Laws Concerning Gaming Within Indian Lands
    3,001 words
    They are Native Americans who are trying to build better lives for themselves but are stopped in there tracks by the state supreme court. Proposition 5 passed in November of 98, which would allow more gambling in the Indian reservations. The proposition was ruled to be unconstitutional. Now the Indians are rebutting the fact that they are sovereign and the ballot was passed. Under existing law, Indian tribes operate as semi-sovereign nations, and are liable under federal law only. Recently, the ...
  • Seminole Tribe Of Florida
    393 words
    The Seminole Indians are a tribe of Indians who now have territory and reservations in Florida and Oklahoma. They once belonged to the Muskogee tribe that lived along streams in what are now southern Georgia and Alabama. The Seminoles moved to Florida and Oklahoma around 1708 when the white men drove them out of their homes and took their land. The Seminoles adjusted well to life in Florida. In the late 1700's and early 1800's Florida was a territory of Spain, that made the Seminoles Spanish cit...
  • Indian Tribe
    326 words
    Summary: The movie begins by showing Lieutenant Dunbar in an American civil war hospital tent. His leg is about to be amputated. While doctors are on a smoke break, he decides to break a long-standing stalemate by riding a horse across enemy lines. Unbelievably, he ends up being the hero after he accidentally leads the Union troops to a victory. As a reward, he gets the best doctor to fix his leg and has a choice of any duty. He requests a position on the western frontier. However, when he gets ...
  • American Indians The Coyote Clown
    518 words
    A lecher an outlaw the creator and teacher of men, often called a clown and a trickster, the coyote clown plays an important pragmatic and ceremonial role in the lives of the Native American people. Among the South Western Indian tribes the coyote stories stands as a mirror for their own lives, pointing out the petty foible and the most magnificent strengths. To the North American Indians the Coyote Clown is mischievous and causes havoc. The coyote is a supernatural figure that creates and destr...
  • Most Of The Indian Dances And Ceremonials
    669 words
    Woodlands Indians of the Eastern Wilderness The Woodland Indians were the first Indians that the American colonists met. In the beginning the sellers from Europe thought that the Indians were ignorant savages. But soon they found out that they can learn a lot from the Indians. Indian ways were valued because they were suited to convert the things around them into food, clothing, shelter, weapons, tools, and utensils. There were no stores in the wilderness, so the families had to make these thing...
  • Indians Place Names On Long Island
    3,132 words
    Paumanok if what the Indians called Long Island, it means "land of tribute". Before 1609, the only habitats on Long Island were the Indians. Henry Hudson, who docked his ship the Half Moon off the shores of what is now Coney Island, was the first white visitor. Hudson along with his crew took small boats to shore to catch fish and see what the land and the people were like. The Canarsie Indians, who heard of white people but never saw them, were very curious to meet their counterparts at the sho...

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