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  • Formation Of The Independent Labour Party
    1,025 words
    Account For The Emergence Of The Labour Party And Discuss Its Fluctuating Fortunes Upto 1914 It is an oversimplification to talk about the rise of the Labour Party as if it were a single homogeneous body. In fact it was an amalgamation of three different socialist groups - the Social Democrat Federation, the Fabian Society, and the Independent Labour Party - with some trade unions. Although these groups were all described as socialist, their aims and methods were not always the same; the word 's...
  • Socialism In Britain After The Labour Party
    2,880 words
    Introduction With the campaign 'New Labour Because Britain Deserves Better', it appeared that the new look of the Labour Party was so promising that most Britons have poured their votes for the Labour Party, and Tony Blair and his family moved to stay at the 10th Downing Street. It is said that the New Labour won the election, because they have tried to understand what British people wanted. Like it or not, the New Labour has simply followed Margaret Thatcher's achievements. Moreover, Tony Blair...
  • Labour Government
    877 words
    The appointment of the first Labour government in January 1924 was widely regarded by contemporaries as an event of great political and social significance. The new Prime Minister, Ramsay MacDonald, lacked the governmental experience of his predecessors and had risen from obscure origins. Many on the political right expressed alarmist expectations of attacks on private property and established institutions. Among the more extreme predictions was a claim that women would be national ised and free...
  • Rise Of The Labour Party
    560 words
    The rise o the labour party was due to many factors. Factors such as the movement of people from the countryside to cities which changed the economic structure of britain and also changed the social structure and this led to the need for political change. The need for political change to help the working class people who were living in poverty which had been highlighted by booth and rowntree who surveyed LOndon an york two of england's major cities. Better education led to the realisation that t...
  • Most Successful Labour Government
    2,262 words
    To judge success, we need to look at what we are comparing their success or failure with. In this case, success is judged by how Labour achieved their aims, and if the present situation in Britain improved. There are also many different areas that success can be judged in. These are economical, political and social. From studying these individual areas, an overall judgment can be made. Also who is judging this success Varying views were seen depending on the political stance of the judge. Howeve...
  • Socialism Within The Labour Party
    2,185 words
    Critically assess the Political Philosophy of Socialism and it's evolution within the British labour party during the interwar period, 1919-1939 It was Karl Marx (1818-1883) who said: 'Socialism moves us to take a definite position against a structure of society in which the unjust division of wealth contradicts basic decency'. Marx, often founded as the father of modern day socialism, saw a huge injustice in the division of wealth between the proletariat (working class / ruled class) and Bourge...
  • Economic Problems The Labour Party
    1,599 words
    During the 1920's many economic problems occurred in Britain. However the main problems did not occur until 1929 when the Wall Street Crash occurred. The Wall Street Crash involved share prices falling to about 1/4 or even less than what they were bought for. This essay will examine how Britain was affected during the 1930's and will look at the reforms introduced by the National Government. This will be done by examining four areas namely Depression, Labours Response, National Governments Respo...
  • Evident Weaknesses Of The Labour Party
    1,661 words
    The setting up of the Labour Representation Committee in 1900 caused no great stir at the time, and there were few who regarded it as more than another pressure group aiming to strengthen the labour cause. However, by 1931 the Labour Party had been in office on two occasions and had overtaken the Liberals as the second party in Britain. How did this situation arise What factors, social, economic, and political played a part What contribution did individuals make What effect did circumstances suc...
  • Great Contender Denis Healey
    1,025 words
    The great contender Denis Healey: A Life in Our Times Edward Pearce Little, Brown 30, pp 634 Speculation about what might have been is the sort of self-indulgence for which Denis Healey has only contempt. Looking back on his own career, he said - and I have no doubt meant - that doing something was far more important then being somebody. But those of us with less robust emotions, who worked with him through the traumas of the late Sixties, cannot resist occasionally imagining what would have hap...
  • Cripps
    679 words
    The creepy Mr Cripps The Cripps Version Peter Clarke Allen Lane 25, pp 574 One day, when he was a member of the wartime coalition Cabinet, Stafford Cripps barged into Number 10 demanding an instant audience with Winston Churchill. The great man was on the lavatory. He grunted to his butler to tell Cripps to get lost: 'I can only deal with one shit at a time. ' To other contemporaries, Cripps was 'a saint' who was the only person to possess the talent and stature to replace Churchill as war leade...
  • Attlee's Labour Party
    2,034 words
    Did Clement Attlee Betray His Socialist Principles When Elected As Prime minister Socialism has its roots in the nineteenth century writings of Karl Marx who demonstrated the evils of capitalism in works such as "Das Kapital" (1867). Karl Marx was seen as a revolutionary and socialists, not keen on revolution, attempted to popular ise socialism in two ways. The first was to make socialist ideas respectable for the public and socialist societies, such as the Democratic Federation formed in 1881 a...
  • Rationalise The Labour Party Organisation
    2,226 words
    As Eric Shaw rightfully points out between 1979 and 1983 Labour was "wrenched apart by ruptures of an unprecedented ferocity which inflicted enduring harm on its public image and contributed to the electoral disaster of 1983". (Shaw, 162) After the General Election defeat in 1979, the Labour party began to follow the outmoded ideas of the left-wing tradition touted by Tony Benn who had stepped in after the 1979 defeat to fill the intellectual vacuum that existed within the Party. At this period ...
  • Conservative And The New Labour Policies
    1,938 words
    British Government: Assessed Essay. New Labour, New Britain? In 1997 eighteen years of Conservative government was finally ended by the Labour party's election victory. The new Prime Minister, Tony Blair, had swept to power with an unprecedented majority for a Labour government and was hailed by the British public as some sort of new political messiah. During the eighteen years of Tory rule, the British public had become very disillusioned with the state of the country. People were looking to To...
  • New Labour
    502 words
    To what extent has "new" Labour broken with the Party's traditional values and ideas? (30) Traditionally, Labour were a Democratic Socialist party believing in power for the work force and benefits for the under privileged in the form of the welfare state. Labour believed in 'collectivism' where wealth was redistributed, and groups were set up to represent the masses. Linked to this was 'distributive justice' which included a progressive tax system and inheritance and wealth taxes. Another point...
  • Rise Of The Labour Party
    1,785 words
    Many people have argued that it is important to acknowledge early influences in order to understand the birth of Labour's rise to power. The rise of Labour stemmed, fundamentally, from the harsh working and living conditions of late nineteenth century Britain. For example in 1884 intellectuals formed the Social Democratic Federation, the Socialist League and the Fabian Society, which varied in character from the revolutionary to the reformist. Also, the workers formed trade unions, not only the ...

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