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  • Relationship Between Louisa And Tom
    1,516 words
    Hard Times Hard Times was first published in Household Words as a series and then compiled into 3 books. Dickens intertwined several people's lives in these writings. Louisa had two very different relationships with her father and brother. Louisa's relationship with her father is one where she believes at first that he is just using her to show how his "facts and only the facts" teachings work, and later she finds out that he really loves her and cares deeply for her. Unlike her relationship wit...
  • Alcott Sisters
    517 words
    Louisa May Alcott Biography Best remembered for her books about the March family, especially her children's masterpiece, Little Women, Alcott also wrote sensational novels and thrillers for adults. She was a very creative, difficult, and willful girl who was both moody and loyal. Born in Germantown, Pennsylvania on November 29, 1832, Louisa was the second daughter of Abby May and Amos Bronson Alcott. Being one of four sisters, who were Anna Bronson, Elizabeth Sewall, and Abba May, the Alcott sis...
  • Tom And Louisa Gradgrind
    2,182 words
    Hard times is set out in three different books: The Sowing; The Reaping; The Garnering. They are named so as it has a special reference to the education and upbringing of children. The titles collectively underlines the basic plot. It suggests that the grounding children received in their formative years would directly affect their adult lives. This comes evident as pupils of the Gradgrind system of education is not ready to tackle situations which require imagination or experience in life. In H...
  • Bronson Alcott
    1,426 words
    M alyssa Williamson 4/27/00 Louisa May Alcott Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Amos Bronson Alcott, an educator and philosopher, and Abigail May, the energetic, philanthropist. Louisa grew up in Concord and Boston, suffering from poverty as a result of her selfish idealist father's inability to support his family. Bronson Alcott habitually sacrificed his wife and daughters by refusing to compromise with a venal world, most conspicuously when he subjected th...
  • Louisa Lawson
    751 words
    Louisa Lawson was a newspaper owner, journalist, poet and feminist. She was a prominent figure in Sydney's suffragette movement as well as founding Australia's first magazine for women. Louisa Lawson was a great influence on the changes made in Australia at the turn on the 20th century. Louisa Lawson was born near Mudgee in New South Wales. As the eldest daughter of nine surviving children, she was forced to leave school at thirteen, leaving her desire to become a pupil teacher. In 1866 Louisa m...
  • Louisa Lawson
    552 words
    Ordinary, everyday Australian people are often doing extraordinary things. It could be a young child saving someone in a fire, or just by helping out the homeless. These people often show bravery, friendship, and qualities of endurance, adaptability and democracy. Nowadays this is know as ANZAC spirit, but before there was the ANZAC's there was a woman called Louisa Lawson, who spent her entire life fighting for women to be given the right to vote and be equals. Now her life is remembered on a c...
  • Louisa's Dog Caesar
    1,844 words
    In "A New England Nun', Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife. This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets' lives, her dog Caesar's and that of her little yellow canary. Both compar...

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