You are welcome to search the collection of free essays and research papers. Thousands of coursework topics are available. Buy unique, original custom papers from our essay writing service.

15 results found, view free essays on page:

  • World War
    713 words
    Our Eldest Brother George Orwell's infamous "Big Brother" has infected the minds of every one of the millions of readers of 1984. But this horrific view of the future, one in which the government knows everything, keeps the low class down as an economic necessity, and wages a constant war with another of the world's powers, was only in Orwell's imagination... wasn't it In today's world of hi-tech computers, video cameras, and television, the government, along with any other agency with the right...
  • Orwell's Shooting An Elephant
    1,359 words
    Imperialism: Lacking to Say the Least Upon reading such works as George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant, one realizes just how ineffective an imperialistic government is. Imperialism has been considered by some to be a perfectly adequate form of government. Unfortunately, these people are usually the ones who never experience Imperialism firsthand. The flaws of Imperialism are made painfully evident in Orwell's essay. It is certainly impossible to truly understand what it must have been like to li...
  • World Orwell
    549 words
    Apparently Orwell's closing call-to-action is not completely applicable anymore, as the society conditions changed a bit over the last century, but the book is nonetheless attractive. At the beginning a reader may be a little surprised by the absence of a central plot, but then this it is easy to penetrate into the world Orwell showed here. His descriptions are so outstanding that you really feel as if you are sharing the storyteller's experience. You can feel the strong heat of the restaurant's...
  • Orwell's Experience With The Elephant
    852 words
    In his essay Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell explains how the controlling authorities in a hostile country are not controlling the country's population but are in fact a mere tool of the populous. Orwell's experience with the elephant provided the insight for his essay, and gives a clear example of the control the natives have over the authorities. The authorities in Lower Burma were there to police the state that their government controlled, but were only accomplished in being controlled by...
  • British Author George Orwell
    759 words
    In the essay Shooting an Elephant, George Orwell describes an internal conflict between his personal morals and his duty to his country moreover, his duty to the white mans reputation. Orwells decision to kill the elephant is a direct result of oppression. Oppression perhaps goes deeper than the average man would imagine, noticeably hindering even the lives of the oppressors. Orwells moral values are challenged in many different ways, ironically enough while he too was the oppressor. Orwells ext...
  • George Orwell
    370 words
    As a journalist and writer of autobiographical narratives, George Orwell was outstanding. But he will be remembered primarily for two works of fiction that have become 20th-century classics: 'Animal Farm', published in 1944, and 'Nineteen Eighty-four' (1949). George Orwell is a pen name. His real name was Eric Arthur Blair, and he was born in 1903 at Monti hari in Bengal, India, where his father was a minor British official. His family had social status but little money, a fact that influenced O...
  • Hughes And Orwell
    744 words
    Decisions Many people find it difficult, if not impossible, to defy the unspoken tradition of modern authority. Stanley Milgrim's Perils of disobedience shows that an otherwise sensitive, good-natured citizen can easily be transformed into a tool, and perform actions that one would never do if given enough time to reflect. Milgrim's study suggests that an individual's need to conform to authority overrides the sense of responsibility to sort right from wrong. Langston Hughes, in Salvation, expla...
  • Same Subliminal Whispers Orwell
    567 words
    Whispers Reading Orwells "Shooting An Elephant" helped me to remember about many decisions I have made, including a decision I made on a warm senior day of high school during lunch. "Shooting An Elephant" is ingeniously linked to everyday life. Orwell writes about his experiences as a political intruder in a western country, how it affected his life, and how these people influenced him to kill an elephant. My decisions are often based on the same subliminal whispers Orwell heard when he was marc...
  • Only Job Orwell
    865 words
    The True meaning behind the Killing of the Elephant An elephant has been shot and killed. Wt a mere act of violence or does it go beyond that In this situation, the killing of the elephant goes far behind self-defense and security. It's taken to a personal level, which leads to difficult complications. George Orwell is overwhelmed with what is expected from him, than what he knows is morally correct. Even though he knew emotionally that it was wrong to shoot and kill the elephant; it was more im...
  • George Orwells Shooting An Elephant
    712 words
    In George Orwells Shooting an Elephant, Orwell is faced with a terrible decision. By taking the life of the elephant which so wrongly took the life of the Indian, the killing was then justified in Orwells mind. He was taking a stand for the lower man, which in his eyes represented himself, and showing an overwhelming power over the elephant, or British Empire. This view will always win the heart of the reader. The reader can feel sympathy towards Orwell rather than hate him for taking another be...
  • George Orwell's 1984
    209 words
    George Orwell's '1984': Pertinence To Today's Society [ Click here to purchase this essay ] 6 pages in length. Perhaps George Orwell's prophetic novel about a totalitarian existence was merely a result of the author's overactive imagination. Maybe, however, it was a warning. Orwell, himself, said he did not believe such a society as he describes in '1984' would ever arrive; however, he did believe that something resembling it most definitely could. What is made crystal clear is that when human b...
  • British Modernism In Orwell's Essay
    1,620 words
    Orwell was born in 1903 in Bengal, India and died on January 21, 1950 in London, England (Orwell 1). His father served as a British civil servant in India and sent Orwell to a private school in England where he won a scholarship to Eton, the foremost "public school" in the country. Orwell noticed the difference between his own background and the wealthy background of many of his schoolmates while attending Eton. After leaving school Orwell joined the Imperial Police in Burma. While in service fr...
  • Marrakech By Orwell Quotes And Analysis
    1,289 words
    Thesis: For the thesis, I would say that this essay shows how insignificant certain people and cultures are to the rest of the world. For example how someone can juts be buried with no name, and be erased from the world's memory in a short amount of time. Another example would be how the Arab man was envious of a bird's meal. This essay demonstrates how poorly man-kind is treated. Thesis Statement: " When you walk through a town like this -- two hundred thousand inhabitants, of whom at least twe...
  • Orwell
    322 words
    Penguin Books Nineteen Eighty-Four Eric Arthur Blair (George Orwell) was born 1903 in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. The family moved to England in 1907 and in 1917 Orwell entered Eton, where he contributed regularly to the various college magazines. He left in 1921 and joined the Indian Imperial Police in Burma the following year. He resigned in 1928 having come to hate imperialism, as Burmese Days (1934) his first novel shows. After this he lived for several years in pov...
  • Orwell's Childhood
    1,784 words
    ALIENATION & OTHER SUCH JOYS George Orwell expresses a feeling of alienation throughout? Such, Such Were the Joys.? He casts himself as a misfit, unable to understand his peers, the authorities placed over him, and the laws that govern his existence. Orwell writes, ? The good and the possible never seemed to coincide? (37). Though he shows his ability to enumerate what is? good, ? he resigns himself to a predestined state; uncertain of where exactly he fits in society, his attitude is irreconcil...

15 results found, view free essays on page: