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  • Chorus Plays In Euripedes Medea
    1,207 words
    Discuss the importance of the role that the Chorus plays in Euripedes Medea. The Chorus is very much an important part of Euripedes Medea, and indeed many other works written in the ancient Greek style. In this play, it follows the journey Medea makes, and not only narrates, but commentates on what is happening. Euripedes uses the Chorus as a literary device to raise certain issues, and to influence where the sympathies of the audience lie. In the list of characters at the beginning of the play,...
  • Their Revenge Medea And Clytemnestra
    653 words
    A Comparison of a Tragic Hero from Euripidess Medea and Aeschyluss Agamemnon Tragic heroes from Greek tragedies almost always share similar characteristics. Medea from Euripidess play Medea and Clytemnestra from Aeschyluss play Agamemnon display and share traits common to a tragic hero. They both have a flaw, hold a high rank or have an extraordinary ability, seek vengeance, and cause their own downfall another's suffering. All of these traits are displayed clearly in these characters and are sh...
  • Medea Euripides
    403 words
    MEDEA Euripides was intrigued by the old Greek myths that surrounded him. Some writers 1 feel that he represented a critical, sceptical mind at work on these myths, being more interested in individual psychology and removed from the ritual origins of drama. Considered to be third in time of the three great tragic poets of Greek theatre, his reputation grew even after his death in 406 B.C. His formula tended to be provocative and he has been called the first of the realists. At the same time, int...
  • Caring Jason
    1,999 words
    It seems that the nearly all critics of Medea are unanimous in one prominent feature of the play alone, and that is in their immense abhorrence for Jason. Kit to says 'In him (Jason) it is impossible to find anything that is not mean, while Lucas says 'Jason is utterly selfish, and utterly unconscious of his selfishness'. It is hard to find anything kind about Jason as on face value he is such an obvious villain. But all these comments on the Medea centre round a study of Medea herself, while ma...
  • Womens In The Play Medea By Euripides
    1,157 words
    Women's lives are represented by the roles they either choose or have imposed on them. This is evident in the play Medea by Euripides through the characters of Medea and the nurse. During the time period which Medea is set women have very limited social power and no political power at all, although a women's maternal and domestic power was respected in the privacy of the home, "Our lives depend on how his lordship feels". The limited power these women were given is different to modern society ye...
  • Medea's Intense Love For Jason
    1,597 words
    "If only they had never gone... to fetch the Golden Fleece! Then neither would Medea, my mistress, ever have set sail for the walled town of Iol cus, mad love for Jason... ". (Sanderson 14). This quote is the opening lines to Euripides' tragic play, "Medea" (Blaiklock 234). Their predestined fates all begin with Jason and his conquest for the Golden Fleece (Hamilton 161). Medea, known to be a powerful sorceress, was hit by Cupid's arrow and fell madly in love with Jason (Sanderson 3). It was Aph...
  • Eternal Promise Jason And Medea
    382 words
    Through the play Medea, Euripides shows us the importance of keeping a promise given. At the beginning of the story, we see the plays two opposing views of promise keeping represented by the Nurse and the Tutor. As she stands outside of Medea house and laments the way Jason has slighted Medea by taking another wife, the Nurse speaks of the eternal promise Jason and Medea made to each other on their wedding day (17-21). The Nurse wishes Jason were dead for the way he has abandoned his wife and ch...
  • Revengeful And Wicked Nature Of Medea
    1,305 words
    In the ancient play Medea, Euripides uses such devices as irony, conflict, foreshadowing, and stereotype to develop the character of Medea. Various examples can be seen within each of the episodes of the book. Within the Prologue of Medea, there is a vivid image of Medea guarding her children like a lioness guarding her cubs. At this point in the play, this image shows that Medea is a compassionate and loving mother figure. The comparison of Medea to a lioness also shows that she has a strong an...
  • Medea As The Protagonist Of The Play
    1,077 words
    Show me a hero and I will write you a tragedy. ~F. Scott Fitzgerald~ A tragedy can be described and executed in many ways, whether it is through cinema, television or a play for theatre, as long as it has a solemn kind of ending. It is characterized as a very sad event, action, or experience for a certain character in the piece. According to Aristotle's "Poetics", a tragedy needs six elements, a plot, character, language, thought, spectacle, and melody, as in many dramas do, but the organization...

9 results found, view free essays on page: