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  • Medieval Morality Plays Throughout Time
    1,534 words
    Medieval Morality Plays Throughout time, there have been many books, plays, songs, pamphlets, sermons, lectures, etc. written. These writings were all written with some kind of purpose to either inform, persuade, entertain, or teach their audience. One such form of literature not too widely known about is that of the medieval morality plays. These plays were not aimed to entertain, but to teach morals and religion to the uneducated lower classes of people in medieval Europe. The morality plays w...
  • Chorus Narrative Role
    1,332 words
    In answering this question, I will look at the question in two ways. Firstly, I will look at the role of the chorus objectively, examining the basic role of the chorus in the play, and looking at the role of the Chorus as Sophocles would have intended the role of the Chorus to be understood. However, I will then look at how I think the Greek audience would have perceived the role of the Chorus and then how the role of the Chorus is perceived today by a 20th century and examine the key difference...
  • Satiric Play
    589 words
    Homeward Bound Homeward Bound is a satiric play, which attacks the socially accepted standards of today's society. This play is known as a comedy of manners; defined as light social satire. Homeward Bound also consists of amusing characters that the audience can relate to. This type of play appeals to mostly sophisticated audiences and actors because the play consists of clever use of language and brilliant conversation. Elliot Hayes' use of satire in Homeward Bound plays an important part in th...
  • Play With Realistic Characters
    723 words
    The latest play at the Wharf Theatre has proved to be a runaway success. Its producer, Mack Jaded, talks to us about why he chose to perform it. "I decided to perform Travelling North for a variety of reasons. I was impressed by David Williamson's ability to create true-to-life, humourous characters. His faithful recreation of Australian dialogue also influenced me to perform the play. His large following of playgoers is another factor in the play's favour. The messages in the play, however, wer...
  • Eddie Lyons And Mickey Johnstone
    937 words
    Blood Brothers is set in Liverpool in the early eighties. The play follows the life of two main characters: Eddie Lyons and Mickey Johnstone. The play has proved extremely popular with audiences of all ages. In this essay I aim to consider all the dramatic qualities of the play and how Willy Russell uses them to promote the dramatic effectiveness of the play. In Blood Brothers the characters fall into two stereotypical groups: the working class Johnstones and their associates, and the middle cla...
  • Responsible For The Audiences Fascination With Macbeth
    841 words
    This is a really shit essay for those of you who just want to get away with handing something in and getting away with it MacBeth makes for fascinating theater. Discuss MacBeth has the makings of brilliant theater Elements such as dramatic impact, characterization, language and the themes combine to make the play intriguing and compelling. When the play opens in scene one there is thunder and lightening on a 'desolate place', this itself is intriguing Then, racked with curiosity, the audiences f...
  • Audience Into Active Participants In The Play
    902 words
    Our Town: An Anti-Realistic View In his play, Our Town, the three time Pulitzer Prize winning dramatist, Thornton Wilder, uses techniques somewhat unconventional and anti-realistic compared to the works of other dramatists. Being more like a statement, the play's theme is about enjoying the simple pleasures of life and daily routines. Wilder employs many unconventional or anti-realistic ideas and techniques to further advance the play's universal theme and to incorporate audience participation. ...
  • Characters Unlike The Play
    648 words
    In the Greek century most drama plays were tragic, as was the play 'The Love of the Nightgale,' written by Timberlake Wertembakers. Without reading the play first, we were given the chance to watch the play on campus. After reading the book I found there to be many similar and different perspectives between the both of them. When the audience views the play, the production depends on how well the actors portray their character. On the opening night there wasn't as many audience members so the ch...
  • Green Tartuffes
    820 words
    by Moli re I was in the audience at the pro formance of Tartuffe the first night it played at Prairie High School. I really liked Tartuffe, i felt that the play was pretty funny, and i liked how it started off by letting the audience know Tartuffe is a fraud. I thought it was a very good production. In Tartuffe we get pretty much a personal view into Orgons home, all of the play takes place here. In Act I, scene 4, Tartuffe, coming into church everyday and drawing attention with his loud prayer....
  • Help Of The Chorus Creon
    476 words
    The Chorus of Antigone The chorus was not only a major part of Antigone, but also the most insightful portion of this play's cast. The members of the chorus tell Creon and the audience very important truths about themselves. Throughout the play the chorus comments on Creon's actions, and gives us all unbiased views on our hypocritical species. Without a chorus Creon's epiphany may never have occurred and we wouldn't have, as easily, seen our personal flaws. The chorus is included in a very effec...
  • Play
    494 words
    The short one-act play Trifles by Susan Gla spell, was years ahead of its time. Its time was 1916 but the subject matter is timeless. The aspect of this play that most caught my interest was the contrast between the men and women characters. This is a play written in the early 1900's but transcends time periods and cultures. This play has many strengths and few weaknesses, but helps to provide a very accurate portrait of early American women and the issues they dealt with in everyday comings and...
  • Staging Of The Play
    1,014 words
    Our Town " Our Town', by Thornton Wilder, written in 1938, was first performed at the McCarter theatre, New Jersey, on the 22nd of January 1938. It is an example of meta theatre, and chronicles the lives of ordinary, everyday people, during their ordinary, everyday lives. The story is based in Grover's Corners, a small town in New Hampshire, set at the turn of the century. The play involves three main acts, each focussed upon a different aspect of life. Set in 1901, the first act simply discusse...
  • Used Portrait The Play
    567 words
    DIVING FOR PEARLS ESSAY In the play Diving for Pearls by Katherine Thomson, the audience or reader are subjected to a play that not only addresses the issues of restructuring and redundancy in the working class towns, and the effect on the lives of the people involved, but they also see a world of the main characters, den's, social life, which I believe Thompson uses as a symbol for the future of the town. As both seem to be making changes not necessarily for the best. To make these issues more ...
  • Audiences With A Play
    992 words
    "Well-Made Play" Techniques in Ibsens A Dolls House Henrik Ibsens A Dolls House is a classic example of a modern realistic play. But is it a "well-made play" Eugene Scribes idea of a "well-made play" was designed to present audiences with plots which are interesting and suspenseful and characters that are easy to understand. However, when the "well-made play" criteria is strictly observed, plays lose some of their appeal due to the structural repetition. A Dolls House combines some of Scribes "w...
  • Message Of Paper Wheat
    1,214 words
    Not all plays are character-driven, in fact a great many are not. So if the characters are not what keep the audience intrigued, well then what does There are many possible answers to this question. Paper Wheat uses the history of a group of people, a specific message commenting on a time period, spectacle elements such as song and dance, and the genre of comedy to keep its audience both engaged and entertained. There are many elements to a play that can engage the minds of an audience. Paper Wh...
  • Play The Audience
    1,062 words
    "Oedipus Rex", was written by Sophocles. This play is a Greek tragedy. Many audiences have admired it for years. What makes the play so popular is that it has the exact ingredients that a prototypical tragedy is supposed to have. Aristotle had certain criteria that made a play qualify as a tragedy. A tragedy is when a protagonist is going toward a significant and noble goal and the antagonist stops him / her from reaching this goal. This could be another person, the environment, or his / her tra...
  • Life To The Play And The Audience
    811 words
    A viewing of The Solid Gold Cadillac by George S. Kaufman and Howard Teichman, took place on Friday the 21st of March at the Brisbane Arts Theatre. The Solid Gold Cadillac is a narrative piece concerning four smug directors of General Products Incorporation, and a timid small shareholder whose clever questioning at the annual stockholders meeting causes a stir with the director's self-satisfaction. Posing a threat to the company, the directors decide to keep her quiet by buying her off with a ph...
  • Play's Situation
    784 words
    Essay Question: The situation, the characters, the capacity of the play to keep one guessing and the use of the vernacular are qualities which make 'Summer of the Seventeenth Doll' more than an ordinary play. Discuss. An extraordinary play is where the play, via the actors, exchanges something and leaves and impression on the audience. 'Summer of the Seventeenth Doll' written by Ray Lawler tells about the struggle of how a group of middle-aged adults, living in the '50's, have to cope with the r...
  • Play To Today's Audience
    642 words
    The Fairies are only in our Dreams William Shakespeare seems to have created A Midsummer Night's Dream from his own childhood. In Shakespeare's time it was believed that fairies and little people did exist. Fairies were said to be the reason why the unexplained happened. An unexplained bottle of milk toppling over, or a bucket in the stables was said to be the work of fairies, who avoided human interaction. Puck is the audience's key to the motives of the fairies. The movie version of a play giv...
  • Very Funny Play
    289 words
    Suddenly, Bob dashes out into the audience and jokingly asks one of the audience members if she would like to catch a movie after the play. This type of this was typical at The Complete Works of William Shakespeare in Samuel Park in Dallas. It was an entertaining comedy with many themes and many plays. The comedy was well performed as well and was very entertaining. The actors did a stupendous job of involving the audience and, at the same time, keeping a comic attitude. The characterization was...

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