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  • Causal Argument And The Contingency Argument
    1,633 words
    A cosmological argument is meant to explain the existence of the physical universe. The arguments are supposed to be sound deductive arguments, meaning that the premises lead to evidence, which prove the conclusion to be an absolute truth. The two major cosmological arguments attempt to explain the existence of God. They are the CAUSAL argument and the Contingency argument. There are few differences between the two arguments and there are problems with both. Many of the problems with one can be ...
  • More Evident Principle Of Common Sense
    3,371 words
    Common Sense and the Self-Refutation of Skepticism"I begin then, with my list of truisms, every one of which+ I know, with certainty, to be true". -G.E. Moore, "A Defence of Common Sense" "Russell's view that I do not now for certain that this is a pencil or that you are conscious rests, if I am right, on four assumptions. And what I can't help asking myself is this: Is it, in fact, as certain that all these four assumptions are true, as that I do know that this is a pencil and that you are cons...
  • Aristotle's Thoughts On Zeno's Arrow Argument
    993 words
    The Motionless Arrow: Aristotle's Thoughts on Zeno's Arrow Argument Aristotle's thoughts on Zeno's Arrow Argument as represented in Chapter 9 of Aristotle's Physics: A Guided Study can be understood in such a way that it might not be 'next door to madness'. In this chapter, Aristotle interprets Zeno's argument of the Flying Arrow as 'missing the mark'. There are four premises for this argument, and in Aristotle's opinion, premise three can be rejected. He does not believe that time is composed o...
  • Positive Relevance P 2 A Premise
    3,259 words
    Chivalry is the most significant concept throughout history. Chivalry, in its formal code, came to exist in the Middle Ages around the 12th century. It is not clear as to whether the Romans, the Franks, or the Germans gave rise to chivalry, but each culture brought the seeds of conduct with them. The formal code was based on knightly conduct, with special emphasis on the courtly manners towards women. Chivalry was such an important aspect of morality that the church became heavily involved. The ...
  • Conclusion Of Descartes's Argument
    1,324 words
    Descartes Second Meditation Descartes's Second Meditation discusses how a "body" can perceive things, such as objects. Perception is vital to his first theory that " [he] thinks, therefore [he] is". In order to prove his conclusion; he goes through a series of premises, or arguments, that lead him to his final conclusion. In order to reach this conclusion, he uses a process of elimination. In Descartes's final premise, he uses the idea that in order to perceive something you must have a concept ...
  • Bias On Judgement
    425 words
    10) What are some other key biases that influence judgement Judgement seems to be influenced by a variety of things each have their own implication on judgement. Overconfidence serves as a bias on judgement. Fisch hoff, Slavic, and Lichtenstein, in 1997, tested this idea. The participants were given the question "Absinthe is a: A) liquor or B) a precious stone". The subjects were to choose the correct answer, and state the probability of being correct. It was found that when the subjects were 10...
  • Deductive And A Priori Argument
    2,595 words
    I. Introduction In the year 1098, the monk / arch -bishop / philosopher Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109) began work on his third text the Prosologium. Though he had written at length before, primarily on interpretative doctrines of religious theology, in the Prosologium he attempted a bold new task. His attempt was to prove the existence of god, through the means just of reason. His efforts produced "the ontological argument" (sometimes referred to as the "argument from perfection" or the "argum...
  • Deductive Conclusions From The Premises
    1,534 words
    A Common Distinction In The Logic IsA Common Distinction In The Logic Is Between Induc The above-mentioned statement needed justification to be portrayed as a valid assumption. Therefore differences and similarities had to be explored. However, as we know from every day life, one may apply this distinction in other fields of knowledge. My task will be to present a simple understanding of the different ways we think, i.e. inductively and deductively. As most of us operate with such distinctive bu...
  • Strong Inductive Argument With True Premises
    1,131 words
    Definitions of Basic Terms: An argument is a set of statements one of which is being argued for on the basis of the others, those others therefore being describable as the statements being argued from. To argue for a statement is to present reasons for thinking that it is true; to argue from one or more statements is to present them as reasons for thinking that another statement is true. (Note: the word "argument' has a number of different meanings. Here what we are talking about is good or bad ...

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