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  • Socrates Escape From Prison
    1,132 words
    In Crito, Plato recounts the last days of Socrates, immediately before his execution was to take place in Athens. In the dialogue, Socrates' pupil, Crito, proposes that Socrates escape from prison. Socrates considers this proposal, trying to decide whether escaping would be "just" and "morally justified". Eventually, Socrates concludes that the act is considered "unjust" and "morally unjustified". Socrates then decides to accept his fate and proceeded with his execution. Socrates was a man who w...
  • Socrates Arguments
    508 words
    Elian Gonzales, the way Socrates sees the problem Should an individual abide by the laws of his country no mater what or should he fight back. This is the question Socrates is trying to answer to Crito in this dialog by Plato. The dialog is also closely related with Elian Gonzalez situation because the people are split on whether to send him back in Cuba or let him in US. Socrates will answer this question based on the explications given to Crito. The dialog starts with Crito sitting on Socrates...
  • Socrates Believes In God And Our Conclusion
    1,663 words
    Defense on Socrates There are times in every mans life where our actions and beliefs collide-these collisions are known as contradictions. There are endless instances in which we are so determined to make a point that we resort to using absurd overstatements, demeaning language, and false accusations in our arguments. This tendency to contradict ourselves often questions our character and morals. Similarly, in The Trial of Socrates (Plato's Apology), Meletus' fallacies in reason and his eventual...
  • Trial And Death Of Socrates
    881 words
    This paper will argue that during "The trial and Death of Socrates", Socrates could have given better arguments for his defense. First it will outline the prejudices or accusations Socrates has to face during his trial. It will then show how Socrates acted as tough he wanted to lose the case and finally it will conclude explaining the arguments Socrates could have given in order to be acquitted. During the first speech (18 a-19 b) Socrates has to overcome two different types of prejudices: the o...
  • Death Of Socrates
    976 words
    Socrates, considered by many historians as the greatest mind to ever live, spent his final days under the false accusations of the law. These accusation were that Socrates was not worshipping the gods of the popular ancient culture, and was also corrupting the young with his constant questioning of the truths of other philosophers. Socrates defended himself under the eyes of the court, and proved to all through reason that the accusations of the court were false. However, the jury had found Socr...
  • Socrates
    476 words
    Plato The Trial and Death of Socrates Book 4: Phaedo Socrates is admired for his willingness to explore an argument wherever it would lead as well as having the moral courage to follow its conclusion. Socrates, the master of argumentation, manages to make his points through creative word choices and his eloquent speeches. In book 4, of The Trial and Death of Socrates, Socrates uses his gracious speaking style to prove his debate of life after death. Socrates posses a great ability to portray his...
  • Careful Examination Of Socrates Arguments Against Thrasymachus
    914 words
    The Republic of Plato begins in a similar fashion that many other Platonic dialogues begin, with that of a question. The conversation between Socrates and the aged Cephalus becomes a philosophical discussion of what advantages money has brought to Cephalus' life. Cephalus replies that money has allowed him 'to tell the truth and pay one's debts' (331 b). Nevertheless, Socrates believes this does not portray an accurate description of what justice is. The rest of the first book is a discussion of...
  • Dialogue Between Euthyphro And Socrates
    1,001 words
    What is Piety During the Periclean age (around 400 B.C.) in Athens Greece there was a man named Socrates. He was considered a very wise man by the Athenians. However there were men in power who did not care for him or his teachings; Claiming tha the corrupted the Athenian youth and did not believe in the Greek gods, Socrates was put on trail. On his way to his trial Socrates met a man named Euthyphro, a professional priest who is respected by the 'authorities' (those who want get rid of Socrates...
  • Response To Crito's Argument Of Socrates
    827 words
    1. Crito's Arguments The arguments of Crito are centred and clear. He uses simple persuasion to try and convince Socrates to escape. His arguments push the idea that Socrates should attempt escape for the sake of others, namely his children, friends and the many. Crito points out that other men would have no hesitation in escaping, despite their age. This is dismissed when Socrates states that someone who has lived so long should rejoice in the fact that they have had such a full life. Some of t...
  • Accepts His Fate Socrates
    970 words
    Socrates Accepts His Fate Socrates was condemned to death for corrupting the youth of Athens. One of his students, Crito, visited Socrates in prison and tried to convince him to escape. Socrates refused, warranting that laws are meant to be obeyed. Socrates argued by stating that without the laws, he would not be the man he was. In other words, the laws had a sort of parental authority over him. He also stated that he had entered into an implied contract with the city-state of Athens. Finally, S...
  • Socrates Corrupting The Youth
    953 words
    The main argument in The Apology by famous ancient Greek philosopher Plato is whether, notorious speaker and philosopher Socrates is corrupting the youth by preaching ungodly theories and teaching them unlawful ideas that do harm to individuals and society. In his words Socrates quoted the prosecution's accusation against him: "Socrates is guilty of corrupting the minds of the young, and of believing in supernatural things of his own invention instead of the gods recognized by the state". 1 Furt...
  • Agathon And Socrates
    589 words
    A) Plato's Symposium is a story about a party in which the guests were so sick from continuous parties that instead of drinking at this one party they decide to give stories about love. With the permission of Phaedrus, Socrates has an interesting discussion Agathon instead of a monologue-styled story. Socrates actually starts by giving Agathon a series of questions about love. Socrates goes on to ask Agathon if a father must be father to something in order to be called a father. Then Socrates as...
  • Socrates And Cephalus
    637 words
    Plato Republic Socrates engages in conversations with people claiming to be experts, usual in ethical matters. By asking simple questions, Socrates gradually reveals that these people were in fact very confused and did not actually know anything about the matters about which they claimed to be an expert. Morality is the ethical matter that is brought up in Plato's Republic. Socrates argues the response of Cephalus, Polemarchus and Thrasymachus on what morality is. The question of morality came u...
  • Guiltiness And Innocence Of Socrates
    447 words
    One of the most famous philosophers of all times, Socrates, was put to trial in Athens around 347 BCE in behalf of three major counts. First of all he was indicted for corrupting the youth of Athens. Secondly, he was indicted for not believing in the gods in whom the city of Athens believed in; thirdly he was charged for believing in other new divinities which were not traditional to the city. In this paper, I will assess the guiltiness and innocence of Socrates as portrayed on two major works, ...
  • Irrelevant In Socrates View Of Reality
    1,570 words
    "Because he was unjustly convicted, Socrates had no obligation to remain in prison". Socrates was convicted by a system of government where the people decided what was going to happen to him, a form of democracy. Since Socrates lived under this type of a government, he was accountable to any punishment that they saw fit. This type of government is chosen by the people, Socrates had the right to vote and whether or not he chose the people in charge directly or indirectly, the majority of his peer...
  • Interest Of The Stronger With Thrasymachus
    1,878 words
    In Book 1 of the 'Republic', Socrates, in answer to the question 'What is Justice' is presented with a real and dangerous alternative to what he thinks to be the truth about Justice. Julia Annas believes Thrasymachus thinks Justice and Injustice do have a real existence that is independent of human institutions; and that Thrasymachus makes a decided commitment to Injustice. She calls this view 'Immoralism': "the immoralist holds that there is an important question about justice, to be answered b...
  • Socrates Method Of Speech
    1,154 words
    In Gorgias by Plato, Socrates' beloved craft of philosophy comes into conflict with the art of oratory, used by the Sophists Gorgias, Polus, and Calli cles. In the ensuing discussion, aimed at discovering the true nature and purpose of oratory, a sharp contrast in the style of speech used by Socrates and that utilized by the orators comes into view. The two sides employ very distinct methods of speech, each method supporting the end of the speaker's speech. Socrates' method of speech is a dialog...
  • Justice Socrates
    2,325 words
    Book 1 of Plato's Republic raises the question what is justice Four views of justice are examined. The first is that justice is speaking the truth and paying one's debt. The second is that justice is helping one's friends and harming one's enemies. The third view of justice is that it is to the advantage of the stronger. The last view is that injustice is more profitable than justice. The book begins by explaining that at the time many Athenians are celebrating the introduction of a new goddess ...
  • Socrates Believes In Divine Activities
    1,489 words
    In the Apology, Socrates is sentences to death by a jury of his fellow Athenians. He is charged with both "historical" and "immediate" charges, he attempts to refute these charges appropriately, but in the end his arguments were unsuccessful. Though he received the death penalty, I believe that he was sentenced unjustly. Socrates developed concrete arguments in which he supported, and ultimately proved, however, his efforts reluctantly did not have a positive effect on the outcome of his trial; ...
  • Socrates Arguments
    1,777 words
    The Myth of Er and the Myth of Metals found in Plato's Republic play an integral role in the comprehension and progression of the narrative's debate. The myths are not mere stories; rather, they provide validity, clarification, and concrete analysis to the arguments between Socrates and his interlocutors. Their purpose is to characterize and stress the points that Socrates aims to present. Thus, the myths' goal of enhancing and enriching the dialogue makes them indispensable for the preservation...

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