You are welcome to search the collection of free essays and research papers. Thousands of coursework topics are available. Buy unique, original custom papers from our essay writing service.

31 results found, view free essays on page:

  • Design And Building Of Roofed Theatres
    1,407 words
    HOW WERE THE GREEK AND ROMAN THEATRES DESIGNED DEREK WATTERUD ENGLISH-111 DECEMBER 7, 1994 The designs of theatres during the last five-hundred centuries b. c. varied in many ways of construction and design. The technical advances in acoustics and construction were enormous. The placement of the seating and construction of the stage and even sizes of the theatres varied from theatre to theatre. They varied from open-air to roofed, both columned and free-spanned roofs. The versatility of uses of ...
  • Prototype For Existentialism In The Theatre
    577 words
    Existentialism Existentialism is a concept that became popular during the second World War in France, and just after it. French play rights have often used the stage to express their views, and these views came to surface even during a Nazi occupation. Bernard Shaw got his play 'Saint Joan' past the German censors because it appeared to be very Anti-British. French audiences however immediately understood the real meaning of the play, and replaced the British with the Germans. Those sorts of 'hi...
  • Social Sciences Show Theatre
    363 words
    Social Sciences in Theatre How are the social sciences associated with theatre? In his article "Performance Studies", Helbo identifies many social sciences associated with theatre including psychology, sociology, and semiotics. Psychology, he states, has greatly increased the work of the actor by giving him a tool to examine his character or role in greater depth. Psychology has also affected the spectator by creating a release and even a form of therapy. Sociology is used in theatre to determin...
  • Movie Piracy Security In Movie Theatres
    1,433 words
    With the growing number of internet users participating in movie piracy, this creates a network of users who no longer need to go the movie theatre or video store to watch a movie. Movie piracy has grown enormously in the past few years making it easier than ever to find box office releases with the simple click of a button. This creates a world where it is okay to steal billions of dollars from movie producers, because most of those participating in piracy see nothing wrong with it. Although th...
  • Architecture Of Ancient Greek And Roman Theatres
    1,397 words
    Of the many types of entertainment and past times we have today, theatre is still one of the most loved. For this we have to thank the very earliest forms of ancient Greek and Roman theatre. These ancient time plays were staged often in honor of a god and have paved the way for theatre as we know today. A particular aspect that has had a remarkable effect on the way theatre has evolved is the architecture of ancient theatres. The architecture of ancient Greek and Roman theatres have had a remark...
  • Theatre In The Days Of William Shakespeare
    577 words
    Shakespeare in Love is a fictional movie written about the great writer and poet, William Shakespeare. The story is of a young William Shakespeare barely making ends meet and trying to write a play for the local theatre. However, Shakespeare is suffering from writer's block, and is seeking inspiration by having a muse. A muse is a power, in this case a female, used to inspire a poet. Of course, a love story proceeds. Although fictional, the real story line is the writing of "Romeo and Juliet" by...
  • Cultures
    394 words
    Theatre will always survive in our changing society. It provides us with a mirror of the society within which we live, and where conflicts we experience are acted out on stage before us. It provides us with characters with which we identify with. The audience observes the emotions and actions as they happen and share the experience with the characters in real time. The survival of theatre lies in the very nature of humankind: its inner voyeuristic drive. The desire to watch other people dealing ...
  • Your Heart And Emotions In The Theatre
    678 words
    In the second chapter of his book "Towards a New Theatre", Robert Edmond Jones explains the loss of art in American theatre. Although American theatre puts on the best show, has beautiful sets, and can do a good job "faking it", what we [as American actors] are practicing is far from what theatre should be. Drama is all around us, Jones comments, but not in the theatre. Today's theatre is missing life and is terribly out of date, years behind our times. He attributes this lack of zest partially ...
  • Woman In Theatre Woman In Greek Theatre
    349 words
    Woman In Theatre Woman in Greek theatre is something you just don't see. In fact woman were put in the same category as slaves. In this time of the gods, woman were forbid to play their own part in the famous thing we call Greek theatre. Taking the place of these women were testosterone driven men portraying the woman part with their own preconceived idea of how woman really are. This act of men in drag to portray the "Woman", is absurd. In fact, who ever thought a male could act out the part of...
  • Globe Theatre
    1,729 words
    The Globe Theatre, A seventeenth century English theatre in Southwark, London. Also known, as an Elizabethan theatre was most notable for the initial and contemptuous productions of the dramatic works of English writers, William Shakespeare, Ben Johnson, Beaumont and Fletcher, and others. In 1576, a carpenter named James Burbage built the first theatre in England, which he called, simply, The Theatre, the first time the word was used to refer to a building specifically designed for the staging o...
  • New Theatre The Space
    1,434 words
    Richard Schechner envisions a new theatre in three of his major essays, Happenings (1966), Six Axioms for Environmental Theatre (1968), and Negotiations with the Environment (1968). He does not spend time discussing his famed not not themselves ideology of the performer or ritual ecstasy; instead he discusses a new genealogical hybrid termed the new theatre by Allan Kaprow. Schechner uses the traditional theatre as a comparison and first comments in Happenings because it is unlike traditional th...
  • Negro Units Of The Federal Theatre Project
    1,173 words
    Rachael Rice Humanities What Was The Federal Theatre Project? Throughout the late 1920's an important theatrical movement developed: The Workers' Theatre Movement. In the end, it diminished around the middle of the 1930's, and one of the developments aiding the decline of the Workers' Theatre Movement, was the creation of the Federal Theatre Project. The Federal Theatre Project was the largest and most motivated effort mounted by the Federal Government to organize and produce theater events. Onc...
  • Construction Of The Globe Theatre The G.T.
    714 words
    The Globe Theatre 1. Prehistory Shakespeare joined the Lord Chamberlain men in 1594. At that time the company didn't have an own theatre. Sometimes they played in, , The Theatre' or in the, , Curtain-Theatre'. After James Burbage died in 1598, the lease of the land where, , The Theatre' was built, was passed. His sons Cuthbert and Richard Burbage tried to convince the owner to renew the lease, but he didn't. So Cuthbert and Richard leased land at the south bank of the Themse. Half of the needed ...
  • Form Of Theatre
    1,356 words
    Why does theatre survive? 3rd term acting studies essay by Ralph Gass mann " All the world's a stage... ' to quote the world's most famous playwright William Shakespeare who rose to prominence in the 16th century during the reign of Elizabeth I, and who's plays have excited and obsessed the generations since and will doubtless continue to do so as we approach the 2nd millennium. On this stage the actor represents the symbol of man with all his imperfection and weakness, with all his morals and i...
  • Actors And A New Theatre
    1,638 words
    The Group Theatre began as a small company that provided actors and actresses with a means and a location to practice plays. Three people, Harold Clurman, Lee Strasberg, and Cheryl Crawford formed The Group Theatre. The Group Theatre escalated in 1931 and ended abruptly in 1941 prevailing through the years there were hits, periods of flops, financial straits, depressing inactivity, and spiraling to as glittering of a success as any on Broadway. This story however is also the story of growth and ...
  • Construction Of A New Globe Theatre
    697 words
    The Globe Theatre The Globe Theatre was a London Theatre, which was built in the year 1599. The English actor, Richard Burbage, in partnership with William Shakespeare, the renowned poet and playwright, built the theatre. William Shakespeare was born in 1564. In 1588 he left the town of Wicks hire, and went to London. Here in London he met the brothers Richard and Cuthbert Burbage. These men were also actors or players at the time. The land that was used for building the Globe Theatre upon was p...
  • Similarities To The Greek Theatre
    647 words
    The Greek theatre is a crucial part of architectural history and how sporting venues are built today. The theatre provided entertainment to the citizens of Greece just as sports arenas do today. For example, the existence of the SkyDome in Toronto, Ontario, relies heavily on the Greek theatre and how it was constructed. The Greek theatre took shape in the late fifth century. It is made up of four basic parts. First, is the skene, which was a structure built in the background that would house pro...
  • Middle Of The 19th Century The Theatre
    408 words
    1800-1900 Theatre of the Time o Much larger theatres - Drury Lane (3000) Acting space diminished meaning actors moved behind the proscenium arch o Huge size necessitated slower, more demonstrative acting technique o Less audience involvement due to the large distance from the stage o 1817 introduction of gas light o Auditorium now in darkness during production o Free standing props and hydraulic machinery o Henry Irving - famous actor o Introduction of footlights (using lime) o Emphasis on the s...
  • African Popular Theater
    633 words
    Africa is a home to several traditions of theatre. Some traditions are of ancient origin, while others colonization of the continent in the 19th century and the subsequent imposition of western education, religion and culture. The older tradition are done in African languages. Many of the newer theatre traditions are text based, written in European languages or indigenous African Languages with Latin script. The plays are designed to be performed in more or less formal theater buildings with fix...
  • New Standards In The Musical Theatre
    1,144 words
    At the beginning of the twentieth century, American theatre was heavily dominated by commercialism. In 1909, an attempt to establish a European-style art theatre in New York City was made (Geisinger, 241). The building was so cavernous and unsuited for experimental work that the project failed after two seasons. Dedicated to producing the best of European and classical drama and to fostering new American plays, the first production groups of the 1900's were amateurs (Geisinger, 241). The members...

31 results found, view free essays on page: