You are welcome to search the collection of free essays and research papers. Thousands of coursework topics are available. Buy unique, original custom papers from our essay writing service.

20 results found, view free essays on page:

  • World Through A Screen
    508 words
    Manns 1 Ken Manns Mike Sanders English 10002 15 February 2001 "To Be Awake is to Be Alive" Why do so few Americans not see all of the problems in society Do they simply not care or are they not able to see them With Thoreau's statement, "To be awake is to be alive", he implies that Americans have their eyes closed to these issues. They do not choose to overlook these issues but they simply pass them by because their eyes are shut. Some people are not able to grasp the concept in Thoreau's statem...
  • Longer Lives A Simplified Life As Thoreau
    493 words
    Jerry Petercuskie English 201-03 Dr. E. Brinkley November 27, 1996 THOREAU AS A PROPHET Thoreau was a simple man that believed in having only the basic necessities in life. Thoreau lived a life of simplicity at Walden Pond. In Walden, Thoreau gives a background of his life and some life experiences that he has encountered. Thoreau also explains that the four necessities in life are food, shelter, clothing, and fuel. Thoreau was a prophet of the twentieth-century regarding the issue of materialis...
  • Thoreau Points
    1,284 words
    In Henry David Thoreaus infamous novel Walden, we are shown endless paradoxes that stem from the authors deep and insightful views into natures universal connections with the human race. Thoreau makes himself a quest of finding the meaning to our existence by investigating nature from different perspectives that our preoccupied society constantly overlooks. Two of these perspectives are of viewing nature from a mountaintop or panoramic view and the other being from our own earthly foundations. A...
  • Thoreau In The Mornings
    2,224 words
    Walden - Sounds Summary For all the greatness of literature, there is a greater language of life, the language without metaphor. It is the language where things happen: rays of light shine through the window, the bean plants blossom in the garden, the birds flit through the house. "I love a broad margin to my life", Thoreau writes. Attention to the present moment will make life as exciting as a novel because life then becomes the entertainment. Time is no longer divided into units, but flows bet...
  • Thoreau's Policy Of Civil Disobedience
    404 words
    The Night Thoreau Spent In Jail Essay Prompt Citizens have many rights in their country. They are the ones who choose their leader. Therefore, they should have a right to choose whether they want to support a war or not. Thoreau said", If the law is of such a nature that it requires you to be an agent of injustice to another, then I say, break the law. ' This shows Thoreau's policy of civil disobedience. He thought that people should live under what they believe in and not by the government's ru...
  • Foremost Reactions Toward Henry David Thoreau
    2,313 words
    When Walden was published during the nineteenth century, the reactions of people were exceedingly different than they are of modern society. These reactions were towards every aspect of Thoreau and altered with every change in time. The foremost reactions toward Henry David Thoreau occurred when he went to live on his own at Walden Pond. As strange as it may seem, some critics think that Thoreau's choice to live at Walden Pond was simply because he was a hermit. However, his sheltered life was t...
  • Thoreau Wonders
    777 words
    For about the first half of the book Thoreau questions the lifestyles that people choose. He makes his readers wonder if they have chosen the kind of life that will really offer them happiness. Are they merely living a career or some other narrowly focused routine or is a worthwhile life being lived. Thoreau wonders if the truly valuable elements of life are being taken advantage of if a person isn't living simply. If a person is so caught up in working or never having enough then life, its wond...
  • Their Own Lives
    641 words
    Although the transcendentalism movement was an extremely long time ago the ideas are still pertinent today. When Henry David Thoreau said, 'Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. It is not important that he should mature as soon as an apple tree or an oak'; (247), that he would be telling people to be themselves many generations later. The transcendentalism movement took place during the early 1800's when America was developing its own writing style. The authors ...
  • Very Strong Argument For John Brown
    535 words
    After reading A Plea for Captain John Brown, I find it hard to decide which side to take. Knowing a little history about the subject, I originally sided against the Captain, but by reading Thoreau's essay, I am swayed the other way. He makes a very strong argument for John Brown and probably persuaded many people at the time of his writing. I look at what John Brown did and the first thing that comes to my mind is that it is illegal. I think many people probably looked at the situation and thoug...
  • Written During Thoreau's Stay At Walden Pond
    1,240 words
    Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts, on July 12, 1817. He was born to parents that were very intelligent, yet poor and undistinguished. Despite their struggle with poverty, "their home was a center of affection and vivacity". Thoreau was the third of four children and he showed an early love of nature and was the "scholar" of the family, going on to learn many languages. Because Henry showed so much promise as a student, his parents sent him to Concord Academy. He later went o...
  • Henry David Thoreau
    817 words
    Henry David Thoreau's Quest for Reformation While strolling through the forests near Walden Pond, Henry David Thoreau stumbled across a man and his family. The father, John Field had moved to America from Ireland with his wife and his son in order to "improve [their] condition one day" (Walden, 139). Henry listened intently to what John had to say about his life in America and his plans for the future, and then he offered up his personal experiences concerning society and life in general. To a r...
  • People In Thoreau's Time
    608 words
    Thoreau, Henry David The battle was raging. The two races were pitted against each other in a fight to the death. The ground was already littered with the wounded and dying. One pair was locked together as they tumbled over and over. Both were relentlessly hanging on until one or the other would die. As Henry David Thoreau watched this battle between Red and Black Ants, he thought about life. Henry David Thoreau grew up in Concord, Massachusetts in the mid 1800's. When he was about sixteen he we...
  • Response To Civil Disobedience By Henry David Thoreau
    966 words
    Henry David Thoreau's well-publicized essay, "Civil Disobedience", has been a prized piece of literature in the hearts of many famous Americans and other leaders. Great political figures, such as Mohandas K. Gandhi and John F. Kennedy, have used Thoreau's essay calling for the reform of government to their advantage when speaking to their fellow countrymen. Writing in response to the United States annexation of Texas in 1845, Thoreau felt that this economic move by the United States expedited th...
  • Henry David Thoreau
    505 words
    Henry David Thoreau is a man of many facets; a man who refuses to conform to what the masses believe is acceptable. He calls for the rejection of complexity and for a change in mankind's view of life. Thoreau, in his many writings, demands change in a stagnant society. He emphasizes respect for nature, even to the point of blatant disrespect for humanity. Thoreau's connection to nature was a key ingredient in his lifestyle. He studied ants closely; hoping to understand them like one understands ...
  • Thoreau About The Evils Of Slavery
    4,492 words
    Summary Thoreau begins Civil Disobedience by saying that he agrees with the motto, "That government is best which governs least". Indeed, he says, men will someday be able to have a government that does not govern at all. As it is, government rarely proves useful or efficient. It is often "abused and perverted" so that it no longer represents the will of the people. The "javascript: CharacterWindow The American government is necessary because "the people must have some complicated machinery or o...
  • Thoreau Civil Disobedience
    803 words
    Philosophers, historians, authors, and politicians have spent centuries pondering the relationship between citizens and their government. It is a question that has as many considerations as there are forms of government and it is rarely answered satisfactorily. A relatively modern theorist, author Henry Thoreau, introduced an idea of man as an individual, rather than a subject, by thoroughly describing the way a citizen should live many of his works. He indirectly supplements the arguments he pr...
  • Luke Defies The Law
    378 words
    Henry David Thoreau would not believe in what Luke was fighting for. Luke was a man in jail for the destruction of municipal property. Yet he doesn't, in my mind, show any reason why he destroyed parking meters. Is Luke trying just to defy the law or does he have any reason behind what he does? Thoreau says that any man who chooses to fight should have something to fight for. Now why would he approve of Luke if Luke had no reason, other then he was drunk, to fight the law. Civil disobedience is ...
  • Thoreau In His Own Mind
    988 words
    Self-reliance the ability to make your own decisions confidently and independently. (Encarta) Thoreau in his own mind is completely self-reliant. In? Walden? Thoreau explains how he believes the meaning of self-reliant to be. In his mind material possessions do not make a man, but the man makes the man. In this paper I will explain Thoreau's point of view, and the point of view's of others. In the chapter of? Where I Live and What I Live For? Thoreau makes an interesting quote. Thoreau states, "...
  • Only Thing Thoreau
    1,179 words
    Henry David Thoreau, naturalist and transcendentalist, discusses several important subjects in the self-authored book Walden. A cardinal topic that keeps repeating in the book is that of maintaining a simpler -yet superior- existence, as this quote by Thoreau illustrates: "I am convinced, both by faith and experience, that to maintain one's self on this earth is not a hardship, but a pastime, if we will live simply and wisely... ". This statement is quite true and, given the provisos of living, ...
  • Civil Disobedience By H.D. Thoreau
    361 words
    Civil Disobedience By, H.D. Thoreau H.D. Thoreau lived in a time of slavery and taxation. He was an abolitionist and vehemently anti-establishment. Civil Disobedience is the story of his life which is laced with quotes and comparisons of history and literature. The story is also his views on the American and other governments. On page 19 he first compares the army, the tax collectors and government servers to machines and says that they have no morals. "A drab of state, a cloth-o'-silver slut, t...

20 results found, view free essays on page: