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  • Federalist Party
    409 words
    The Constitution itself did not mention political parties, and it was assumed that none was going to arise. But this was soon proven wrong when the debates between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists in 1787 and 1788 stir into a two party system. This soon led to a permanent feature in American policies. In early times, groups of people formed temporary assembly and voted together either for or against a specific policy. When the policy was settled, the assemblies would dissolve. The Federalist...
  • Ratification Of The Constitution
    584 words
    The Great Debate After the ratification of the Articles of Confederation, many problems arose due to its weaknesses. This form of government was created to unite the states under one law, and was intended to strengthen patriotism as well as the economy. Ironically, it had the opposite effect- economic and social depression spread throughout the country. The Constitutional Convention of 1787 recognized that certain measures had to be taken to bring the US out of recession, thus the idea of creati...
  • Anti Federalist
    694 words
    Most Americans were very suspicious of government, but the Anti-Federalist was really mistrustful of the government in general and strong national government. This mistrust was the basis of their opposition to the constitution. They feared it had created a government the people could not control. Many distinguished Americans were Anti-Federalists. Leaders included George Mason and Elbridge Gerry. Both attended the Philadelphia Convention but had refused to sign the constitution. The Anti-Federal...
  • Federalist Party Position On Foreign Policy
    1,529 words
    In early American government there were two emerging political views that were blatantly obvious in the new states; federalists and anti-federalists. In this paper two main topics of interest for each of the parties will be discussed, the role that government should have according to the differing views and the subject of foreign policy. The role of government as a according to the Federalists They support a stronger federal government. They felt that people can't govern themselves and that a na...
  • Anti Federalist Party
    367 words
    Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists From 1787-1790 the development of the American Constitution was a battle between two opposing political philosophies. America's best political minds gathered in Philadelphia and other cities in the Northeast in order to find common ground in a governmental structure. The Federalists and the Anti-Federalists had both some political thoughts that agreed as well as some political thoughts that disagreed. However, both parties would compromise and ultimately come tog...
  • Federalists And Anti Federalists
    702 words
    Perhaps the greatest document of all time, the Constitution of the United States of America was not easily created. Fifty-five great men were needed to hammer out all the details of the Constitution in a long grueling process. As James Madison, architect of the constitution said, "The [writing of the Constitution] formed a task more difficult than can be well conceived by those who were not concerned in the execution of it. Adding to [the difficulty] the natural diversity of human opinions on al...
  • Federalists And Anti Federalists
    458 words
    1. The federalist and anti-federalists were very different in the opinions they shared on how the government should be run. The Federalists had very high class and social men while the Anti-federalists had farmers. The Federalists wanted a republican government with a strong executive branch, while the Anti-Federalists wanted a participatory democracy with a minimum executive branch. These are the three main ways that they are different. The Federalists wanted to follow the filter model. This wa...
  • Anti Federalists And The Federalists
    1,476 words
    When comparing and contrasting Anti-Federalist views on the ratification of the United States Constitution with those of the Federalists, there is the relationship that represents their views upon principles, problems and solutions, which really looks at which side best reflects or departs from the original principles set forth for the Declaration. It can be argued that the two sides are quite contrary in their distinct perceptions, which each group believing that its views are the right ones. T...
  • Constitution And The Anti Federalists
    1,018 words
    Essay Question # 7: Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists The Constitution of the United States is the system of fundamental laws of the United States of America. The Constitution was drawn up by 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia during the summer of 1787 and ratified by the states in 1788. According to Professor Lowi, the Constitution was based on three principles of limitation: federalism-the "vertical" division of power, separation of powers-the "horizontal" division of...
  • Anti Federalist
    551 words
    Anti-Federalists were people who opposed the ratification of the Constitution. They believed strongly that the Constitution would not be able toe maintain a system of republican government because the Federalists were proposing a government that was the opposite of what they believed in. Anti-Federalists believed that the greatest power should be placed in the legislature, composed of representatives elected by the people of the community. Although, this governing would not work because it was m...
  • Fears Of The Anti Federalists
    1,117 words
    Federalists vs. Anti-Federalist: The Constitutional Debate The road to accepting the Constitution of the United States was neither easy nor predetermined. In fact during and after its drafting a wide-ranging debate was held between those who supported the Constitution, the Federalists, and those who were against it, the Anti-Federalists. The basis of this debate regarded the kind of government the Constitution was proposing, a centralized republic. Included in the debate over a centralized gover...
  • Superior To The Anti Federalists
    726 words
    By: Paul City on a hill: A new nation is born The city on a hill idea was first taught by the puritans that came from Europe, that wanted America to be a shining example to all the world. It was to be a place built on new rules and new ideas. Overall, it was supposed to be a nation that rose above all the others so that it could be marveled at and copied. In this paper it will be proven that the federalist approach to how the "City on a Hill" idea should be put into action was superior to the wa...
  • Montesquieu And Many Other Republicans
    2,175 words
    Dan BlazoMC 271, Section 1 Stokes 23 March 2005 Influenced by Republicanism, but not a True Republican The philosophy of a republican form of government was certainly not a creation of James Madison and the Federalists. The idea of such a government has been around since the beginning of political philosophy. While the definition has changed over the centuries, certain constants continue to define a strictly republican regime. The goals and priorities of a republic are distinct yet dissimilar fr...
  • Election Process Of The House Of Representatives
    1,065 words
    The House of Representatives One of the biggest disagreements between the federalist and the anti-federalist was the issue of the separation of powers, that the executive, judicial, and legislative branches should be separate and distinct. The anti-federalists were afraid that the mixing of the powers would enable the government to hold all of the power and trample on the rights of the individual. The federalist realized this and addressed the issue by saying that in a government of mixed powers...
  • Great Concern For The Anti Federalists
    3,216 words
    The fundamental point of contention between the Federalists and anti-Federalists in their debates over ratification of the Constitution surrounded the question of what powers were necessary in order to insure the security of the nation as a whole. The federalists, of course, believed that a strong central government was necessary, for reasons of national security and economic prosperity. The anti-Federalists were strongly opposed to the centralization of power, rather, they were concerned with r...
  • Federalists Vision Of America
    462 words
    The American Revolution, arguably the most significant era in United States history, is what is mainly responsible in shaping our country into what the strong nation it is today. During this period of time, there were many conflicting views on the philosophies and the visions of Americas future. Individuals such as George Washington, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton were the men that led the supporters of a stronger national government, otherwise known as federalists. The federalists were s...
  • Centinel Of The Anti Federalist Arguments
    2,566 words
    When comparing and contrasting Anti-Federalist views on the ratification of the United States Constitution with those of the Federalists, one must also consider the inherent relationship that represents their respective views upon principles, problems and solutions, ultimately surmising which side best reflects or departs from the original principles set forth for the Declaration. It can be argued that the two sides are quite contrary in their individual perceptions, which each faction believing...
  • Anti Federalist On Ideology Of Representation
    1,311 words
    The debates between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists brought up ideas that can now be traced back to our Constitution. Their disputes and differences in ideology underlie and continue to shape our system of government today. Despite their very different routes, they both shared the common goal to develop freedom, equality, liberty, and justice for all. However, their different modes of thought are still not settled and continue to be argued about today. For example, what is the proper divisi...
  • Constitution And Institute A Strong Central Government
    455 words
    The Federalists believed that a strong central government would benefit the new nation. They felt that the men who framed the Constitution were bright, capable, and experienced, and after debating it for four months, it must be perfect. The federalists trusted in the checks and balances of the Constitution and knew that power would not be given to one party, or branch of the government. These men felt that a republican form of government was the most advantageous for controlling the effects of f...
  • Anti Federalist Papers
    2,571 words
    The anti-Federalists were against the ratification of the constitution. The views of the Federalists and the anti-Federalists were completely different. The Federalist and anti-Federalist papers were battles over problems with the Constitution. The only reason the anti-Federalists agreed to help ratify the constitution was because of the Bill of Rights and without the Bill of Rights the Constitution would not have been ratified. Following the American Revolution the United States was free of Bri...

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