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  • American And French Soldiers
    405 words
    Creative Writing: Siege of Yorktown It was four o'clock in the morning when my commanding officer awoke me and we were ordered to prepare to march. We had set up an extensive camp at Chatham in New York, we all believed that we would attack New York City. It turned out that we were marching on towards Yorktown. When we arrived at Yorktown the bay was full of French ships. Our army along with the French encircled Cornwallis. Cornwallis did not surrender, he waited for a larger British fleet to sa...
  • Year In Time 1956 The Fifties
    1,392 words
    A Year in Time 1956 THE FIFTIES: A period of time between 1948 and 1964. The fifties are more a state of mind than an actual span of years. THE FIFTIES: A time when men were men, and women were women. THE FIFTIES: A time when everyone knew who they were. A time when you went to school, graduated, (or dropped out) got a job, got married and had kids, in that order. THE FIFTIES: A time before the Beatles, hippies, riots in the streets and Vietnam. A time when cars were works of art, and each model...
  • Effects Of The French And Indian War
    715 words
    The French and Indian War, a colonial extension of the Seven Years War that ravaged Europe from 1756 to 1763, was the bloodiest American war in the 18th century. It took more lives than the American Revolution, involved people on three continents, including the Caribbean. The war was the product of an imperial struggle, a clash between the French and English over colonial territory and wealth. Within these global forces, the war can also be seen as a product of the localized rivalry between Brit...
  • English And The French
    738 words
    With the end of the Seven Years' War and the fall of New France in 1763, Britain assumed control of almost all of North America. The Seven Years' War was for the possession of the Ohio Valley. A valley rich in the fur trade industry and land good for future settlement. Britain's newly conquered country would now have to deal with the opposing cultures to which forms their population. Britain's colony was home to a society of sixty thousand francophone Catholics. Britain was faced with the issue ...
  • Arrival Of Blacks In Canada
    403 words
    The arrival of blacks in Canada is a very interesting topic. In 1606 Mattie u Da Costa, a translator for a European ship named Jonas was first black man that was recorded in Canada's history (he was from Portugal). His job was to translate the language of the "MicMac" Indians during trade on the Pierre de Gua expedition. Later in 1628, a British ship went up the St. Lawrence River to arrive at New France. In its cargo was a single Madagascan Black child. This child, who was six years old at the ...
  • Their Dependence Upon The British Cable Network
    1,888 words
    Imperialism has existed in the world since the beginning of government all together, but this practice took a dramatic turn in the latter half of the nineteenth century. New inventions, modern thinking, and stronger governments all made imperialism easier. Now thousands of miles could be conquered in a matter of months; an empire could have a stronger hold on a colony than ever before. The result was that by the end of the century, at least one European nation had a claim to nearly every piece o...
  • Black Loyalists From New York To Halifax
    5,420 words
    The Micmac First Nation called it Chebucto. Rudyard Kipling dubbed it 'Warden of the Honour of the North'. In 1993 Harper's Bazaar described it as 'the very anatomy of a hip city', and in 1917 over 2,000 people called it a final resting place. This is Halifax, Nova Scotia the Mi " km aq ranged over most of the Maritimes and Quebec's Gaspe Peninsula, speaking the Algonquin tongue The aboriginal people of the Maritimes wintered on the Fundy side of the province, hunting deer and moose on expertly ...
  • General Edward Braddock And The French Army
    292 words
    The French and Indian War The French and Indian War was fought on July 9, 1755. This battle took place at Fort Duquesne, in western Pennsylvania, which was one of the many French forts in the Ohio Valley. The fight was between the English army, which was led by General Edward Braddock and the French army, which was led by CaptainBeaujeau. The English army included 1,750 British regulars and 450 colonial militia. The French army, which included Indians, included less than 1,000 men. The English a...
  • Washington
    578 words
    On April 30, 1789, George Washington, standing on the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in New York, took his oath of office as the first President of the United States. 'As the first of every thing, in our situation will serve to establish a Precedent,' he wrote James Madison, 'it is devoutly wished on my part, that these precedents may be fixed on true principles. ' Born in 1732 into a Virginia planter family, he learned the morals, manners, and body of knowledge requisite for an 18th cen...
  • Combined Force Of French And Indians
    997 words
    In July 1755, a few miles south of Fort Duquesne, now Pittsburg where the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers meet, a combined force of French and Indians ambushed British and colonial troops. This catastrophe was to ultimately become the starting point of the French and Indian War. During the "Seven Years War", as the French and Indian War is commonly called, there were wins and losses on both sides, but ultimately the British were victorious with the help of William Pitt. However, the War caused ...
  • Americans Drive Out The British
    1,035 words
    The French had many problems during the American Revolution. These problems started when the French agreed to give the Americans supplies. The Americans thanked them but the French did the wrong thing for their country. They gave a lot of their supplies that they needed at home to the Americans. This loss of supplies increased the debt and led to the French Revolution. The French Revolution was more extreme then the American Revolution because the country of France was not just being confronted ...
  • French And The Americans
    2,423 words
    The journey to independence for the Americans was a long road traveled and it also was a road of luck and coincidence for the Americans and for the French. But in the end the Americans got just about everything they wanted out of the war and the French got almost everything they wanted, but for the most part they both got what they initially wanted and that was independence for the Americans and revenge for the French. At the beginning the French and the British came to the new world because of ...
  • 500 French Soldiers And Indian Allies
    1,311 words
    In the act of war, men are in conflict with each other over certain things and fighting is a way to remedy this. However, every decent man knows that there are certain codes of chivalry that one is upheld to during an act of war. These are basic codes of respect and rationality that go along with fighting. Theses are rules of conduct that characterize a gentleman. At Ft. William Henry, the Marquis de Montcalm and the French army violated these manners of war. The French demonstrated the curtsey ...
  • Haig In June 1916 Before The Battle
    436 words
    Douglas Haig was born on June 19 1861, the son of a wealthy whiskey distiller, he was educated at Oxford and Sandhurst. Haig participated in the Omdurman campaign (1897-1898) and the Boer War (1899-1902). His rank remained inspector of general cavalry in India from 1903 until 1906, when he became director of military training at the war office. In 1909 he became chief of staff of the Indian army. At the beginning of World War One in 1914, Haig commanded the first Army Corps. In December of 1915 ...
  • Admiral De Grasse With The French Fleet
    351 words
    The Battle of Yorktown The battle of Yorktown was the most important battle of the revolutionary war because Yorktown was a very big and very populated town and thoarfor made it a very important military benifit. Washington sent his French aide, the Marquis de Lafayette, to Virginia in the spring of 1781 with a few Continental troops, and these were reinforced from time to time until in June when Cornwallis pulled back down the Yorktown Peninsula. Henry Clinton told Cornwallis to send all his me...
  • Traditional Way Of Government And Their Independence
    297 words
    The war for independence in this country's most important war was not a strategically outstanding war or one filled with military's greatest minds. But one full of supplies shortage and troops turn over as the militias on the states ended their short-term enlistment. In the other hand the British army was coming from a line of victories and it's navy that was soon to have a big defeat against Napoleon. The Americans won the war for Independence for three reasons: The first factor was the steadfa...
  • British General Lord Cornwallis
    2,339 words
    The bloodshed, the glory and triumph, the birth of a nation. These were all direct results of the American Revolutionary War, which itself had officially begun upon the first shots fired by the British army at Lexington and Concord. After these initial shootings, a number of battles were fought to preserve the colonists' freedom from tyrannical England. The climax of the war occurred along the fields of Yorktown, Virginia, where a battle between the colonists and the British was brewing. Enterin...
  • British In Africa
    1,850 words
    Introduction Before 1870 the African continent was not "unknown" to the rest of the world. Africans had been trading directly with the Europeans and Americans before 1500. The possible reasons behind colonialism that have been suggested include missionary, technology, and Imperial rivalry. It is important to try to distinguish between the difference in the term's colonialism and imperialism. They have often been exchanged such that they follow the same meaning. However the English Oxford diction...
  • Disaster Of Cornwallis At Yorktown In 1781
    1,188 words
    Parliament's passage of the intolerable acts in 1774 intensified the conflict between the colonies and Great Britian. Over the next two years, many Americans reached the unthinkable conclusion that the only solution to their quarrel with the British government was to sever all ties with their mother country. Up until 1781, the American Revolution was largely fought using what we refer to today as guerilla warfare. It was a series of engage and retreat tactics that left the allies just barely han...

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