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  • State Constitutions And Laws
    790 words
    The American Constitution The basis of all law in the United States is the Constitution. This Constitution is a document written by "outcasts" of England. The Constitution of the United States sets forth the nation's fundamental laws. It establishes the form of the national government and defines the rights and liberties of the American people. It also lists the aims of the government and the methods of achieving them. The Constitution was written to organize a strong national government for the...
  • Branch Of The Government The Constitution
    2,460 words
    The Constitution Right from the beginning of its creation the constitution of the United States has been a shaky document. The very basis for it being there was in fact illegal. The story of American politics starts with the Declaration of Independence. This document was brilliantly written by Thomas Jefferson and compacted all of the great ideas of enlightenment into one short easy to read paper. The declaration stated all of the ideals the new American nation would strive for. A constitution w...
  • Number Of Provisions Within The Constitution
    1,048 words
    "While the authors of the United States Constitution are frequently portrayed as noble and idealistic statesmen who drafted a document based upon their conception of good government, reality is that the constitution reflects the politics of the drafting and ratification process. Unfortunately, the result is a document that is designed to produce an ineffective government, rather than a government that can respond to issues in a timely fashion". In support of this conclusion, the issues of slaver...
  • Parliament In The 1964 Independence Constitution
    1,264 words
    The 1964 Constitution Is In Fact A Replica Of The 1961 Constitution With Sovereignty Added On. To What Extent Is This Statement Correct The Independence Constitution of Malta of 1964 established Malta as a liberal parliamentary democracy. It safeguarded the fundamental human rights of citizens, and promised a separation between the executive, judicial and legislative powers, with regular elections founded on universal suffrage. Malta still had the three organs of the State even before independen...
  • Change Of The Federal Constitution
    711 words
    The Jeffersonian-Republicans are characterized by their strict interpretation of the constitution, in stark contrast with the Federalists loose or broad interpretation. The Federalists believed that anything the constitution did not forbid it permitted, contrary to the Jeffersonian view that anything it did not permit it forbade. The Federalists advocated the "necessary" and "proper" clause, and their faith rested heavily in the virtue of implied powers. The Jeffersonian party believed that all ...
  • Members Of The Revolutionary Command Council
    420 words
    Comparing Iraq's Constitution with the U.S. Even though the countries of Iraq and the United States have much friction between each other it is very surprising how much the constitutions of both nations are alike. James Madison became the main writer of the United States Constitution, which was adopted in 1789. The 13 states ratified the constitution, making it the basis of the Government of the United States. In 1990 the Iraqi government adopted their constitution. The Revolutionary Council wro...
  • Slave Owner Full Constitutional Rights
    2,710 words
    Liberty, as defined by the Oxford dictionary, is explained as the "condition of being free from restriction or control; the right and power to act, believe or express oneself in a manner of one's own choosing". Liberty is a word familiar to most Americans, since the fundamentals of the country is based on freedom and independence. Symbolism of liberty (such as the national's flag, statue of liberty, the liberty bell, Uncle Sam, the bald eagle) can be seen throughout the United States as a remind...
  • Article 2 Of The Swiss Constitution States
    595 words
    The Constitution of the United States of America is unique in many ways. It is also has various similar qualities from the constitutions of other countries around the world. The constitutions of Switzerland, Poland, and Germany have commonalities with that of the United States' constitution because they all talk about freedom and personal liberty, use the separation of powers as an effective way to run the government, and the elections process. Article 2 of the Swiss Constitution states that, "T...
  • Same Sex Marriages In Its Own State
    1,749 words
    My short answer is 'no', but let me explain. Before answering what I think the situation should be, it is helpful to look at what the situation is. Currently family law is a matter left to a great extent to the states. States have the power to decide who may marry, the legal process required to do so, and what the legal consequences of that marriage are within the state. In all these matters states differ from each other. The state is limited in its actions, though, to the requirement of its own...
  • Struggle For Ratification Of The Constitution
    894 words
    On September 28, 1787, after three days of bitter debate, the Confederation Congress sent the Constitution to the states with neither an endorsement nor a condemnation. This action, a compromise engineered by Federalist members, disposed of the argument that the convention had exceeded its mandate; in the tacit opinion of Congress, the Constitution was validly before the people. The state legislatures' decisions to hold ratifying conventions confirmed the Constitution's legitimacy. The ratificat...
  • People's Representatives For The Constitution
    2,269 words
    How much power and liberty did the constitution give to "the people?" The constitution is the document that has framed and shaped the United States from inception. It is the document that is defended by all new presidents and also the document which affords the citizens of the United States freedoms and rights that cannot be removed. In its drafting it shaped the formation of a new country and a new style of governance. It is a 'bottom up' as opposed to established ways of government which are '...
  • Federalists And Anti Federalists
    702 words
    Perhaps the greatest document of all time, the Constitution of the United States of America was not easily created. Fifty-five great men were needed to hammer out all the details of the Constitution in a long grueling process. As James Madison, architect of the constitution said, "The [writing of the Constitution] formed a task more difficult than can be well conceived by those who were not concerned in the execution of it. Adding to [the difficulty] the natural diversity of human opinions on al...
  • Part Of The Population In Southern States
    578 words
    The Constitution of the United States was fundamentally sound although in need of a few adjustments. It provided stability and union, a strong central government and only needed a few adjustments, one being the rights of free blacks. The Articles of confederation was the country's first true attempt at uniting the nation and having a central government. It provided a firm league of friendship between states but not a strong enough union to be successful. It had fatal flaws which ultimately led t...
  • 3 5 Ths Compromise
    411 words
    The Great Compromise: The 3/5 ths Compromise, and Tax The Great Compromise, the 3/5 ths Compromise, and The Bill Of Rightsjustify that the making of the Constitution was a "bundle of compromises". The Great Compromise is the Constitutional Convention's agreement to establish a two-house national legislature, with all states having equal representation in one house and each state having representation based on its population in the other house. To satisfy the smaller states, each state would have...
  • Article VI Of The Constitution States
    1,259 words
    When the all the delegates in 1787 gathered in Philadelphia, they came to change the Articles of Confederation. Four visible weaknesses of the articles made it impossible for Congress to execute its constitutional duties. These were analyzed in numbers 15-22 of The Federalist, the political essays in which Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay argued the case for the U.S. Constitution of 1787. The first weakness was that Congress could legislate only for states, not for individuals; be...
  • Australian Constitution The Queen
    484 words
    Constitution Comparison By AntiYukeI compared the U.S.A. constitution and the Australian constitution. Their differences are as abundant as their similarities. The Australian constitution is extremely long and drawn out, where as the United States constitution sticks right to the point. All in all, the two constitutions have the same goal in that they wish to bestow the same basic rights to each person. The two constitutions both have a preamble, however the Australian constitution is many more ...
  • Convention Of Representatives Of Five States
    691 words
    The History of the U.S. Constitution By 1786, the Confederation of the United States was in danger of resolution. They were not satisfied with a national government that did not have much authority or have the power to enforce its decisions. Shays Rebellion and the interference of other countries gave reason for a drastic revision of the Articles of Confederation if the United States was going to be successful at becoming a nation. A solution to the problem came to a convention of representative...
  • South Carolina And Other Southern States
    998 words
    The title United States of America to many has come to mean a nation proud and strong, joined together under all circumstances. In the year 1860 that all changed. With the election under way, the nation began to divide over four candidates, one of whom was Abraham Lincoln. When the results were announced the nation would never be the same. Lincoln received about 40% of the popular vote and had failed to carry any of the southern states, yet his victory was a landslide. Within days of the electio...
  • Article VII Of The Constitution
    481 words
    The Constitution is the foundation of our United States government; it stands for any kind of bondage between the states and promotes a compact to join together. How can the Southern territory even ask to be justified in breaking such a strong bond, to be justified in ripping a nation in two and destroying the "law of the land" in which America is based solely on? Using the Constitution as legal evidence provides the clearest way to prove the South unjustified in their irrational decision to sec...
  • People Vote On Constitution Amendments
    560 words
    Article V in the U.S. Constitution discusses what is needed bring about an amendment to the constitution. According to Article V, two thirds of both houses or two thirds of the states have to be in agreement to call a convention for the amendment of the constitution. This process could lead to some problems such as blocking the will of the majority of the people. One solution that has been suggested is to amend the constitution to a vote of the people. Some problems with this are that people som...

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