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  • Leader Of The Distribution Of Indian Lands
    821 words
    Once the white men decided that they wanted lands belonging to the Native Americans (Indians), the United States Government did everything in its power to help the white men acquire Indian land. The US Government did everything from turning a blind eye to passing legislature requiring the Indians to give up their land (see Indian Removal Bill of 1828). Aided by his bias against the Indians, General Jackson set the Indian removal into effect in the war of 1812 when he battled the great Tecumseh a...
  • Land From The Cherokee Indians
    1,719 words
    The generalization that, "The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830's was more a reformulation of the national policy that had been in effect since the 1790's than a change in that policy", is valid. Every since the American people arrived at the New World they have continually driven the Native Americans out of their native lands. Many people wanted to contribute to this removal of the Cherokees and their society...
  • Ejido Land Grants
    2,217 words
    After the conquest the Spaniards, recognized the existence of indian communal lands. Encomienda (large land grants) were given to the conquistadors by the Spanish Crown. During the early encomienda period (1540-1650), encomenderos had complete control over everything within their land grant including the indians. The Crown was theoretically quite enlightened toward their indian citizens in New Spain. They attempted to establish laws which would limit indian exploitation by fixing the hours slave...
  • American Indian Chief Of The Sauk Tribe
    1,145 words
    After the American Revolution the new United States government hoped to maintain peace with the Indians on the frontier. But as settlers continued to migrate westward they made settlements on Indian lands and demanded and received protection by the Army. Tecumseh, a Shawnee chief, organized several tribes to oppose further ceding of Indian lands. But they were defeated in 1811 by Gen. William Henry Harrison at the battle of Tippecanoe. During the War of 1812 many of the Indians again sided with ...
  • Cherokee Indian Tribes
    2,938 words
    INTRODUCTION On May 26, 1830, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed by the Twenty-First Congress of the United states of America. After four months of strong debate, Andrew Jackson signed the bill into law. Land greed was a big reason for the federal government's position on Indian removal. This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentality that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. This period of forcible removal first started with the Cherokee Indians in the...
  • Indians Removal Policy
    408 words
    Arguments over land, restrictions, and laws were common amongst the Indians and whites. It got to a point where the state of Georgia wanted the Indians off their land. Georgia complained to President Andrew Jackson, and he proposed the Indian Removal Policy. This policy was intended to be a peacemaker, but was really a threat to the Cherokee culture. Through the American eyes the removal of the Indians meant more land which in turn meant more power and resources. Since the Indians were leaving, ...
  • Story Of The Indians
    304 words
    Indians of the United States There was a time long ago when there was no man in America, only animals. This was thousands of years before Columbus ever set eyes on America. What he saw was different; he saw a land populated from the north to the south. Due to the natural instinct of man to explore, the explorers just that to figure out the mysterious Indians. The explorers later theorized that the Indians came from Siberia through a land bridge in the Bering Strait during the time when the water...
  • Cherokee Indians Didnt
    1,793 words
    The Indians had many little confrontations with the white settlers and the white government. The Indians didnt always get along with the white people. Even though the Cherokee Indians were a very peaceful tribe they had wars with the whites. All the wars that the Indians went through they lost land or something valuable to them like faith, homes, life styles and sometimes their life. The first major war with the white people the war between 1775 and 1795. (Fremon, Page 17) They lost all of the l...
  • Indians On Reservations To White Settlers
    1,335 words
    Indian Genocide The United States government used military force to follow a policy of genocide toward the Native Americans. Politically, the policies of removal, concentration, and assimilation caused the death of thousands of Native Americans. Economically, the United States government used military force whenever any valuable resource was discovered on Indian Land. Socially, the near extermination of the Buffalo caused starvation and death among the tribes. The evidence clearly indicates that...
  • Indians Land In The West
    795 words
    the expansion of americans into the west was a major step in the 1800's. the united states had a great deal of land that no one had ventured to settle. however, that all changed as the prospect of making it big in the west entered people's minds. although white settlers wanted desperately to settle the west rapidly, they encountered various problems. the west was land like the had never seen. the climate could change from one extreme to the other in a matter of hours, it was very dry, there was ...
  • Indians With The White Settlers
    1,145 words
    American Treatment of the Indian Tribes The American Indian lived a life being one with nature. In their way, they understood the ecological demands of the land and knew that if they took care of the land the land would take care of them. They possessed an untouched wisdom living in harmony with the environment. They hunted the land for buffalo, which provided food and clothing for the ages to come. In time they would almost become non existent at the hands of the "white" man. They would come to...
  • Indians Of New England
    701 words
    Europeans in Pursuit of Capitalism in New England Indian and European people had many cultural differences causing both cultures to clash. The two cultures also had different beliefs in terms of land usage and commodities. The European arrival had an enormous impact on the ecosystem, which as well affected the lives of the Indians. The Indians were used to being mobile in terms of their way of living as opposed to the European colonists, they were used to settling in one place and were also very...
  • Sovereignty Of The Cherokee Indian Land
    1,450 words
    President Jackson and the Removal of the Cherokee Indians " The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830's was more a reformulation of the national policy that had been in effect since the 1790's than a change in that policy. ' The dictum above is firm and can be easily proved by examining the administration of Jackson and comparison to the traditional course which was carried out for about 40 years. After 1825 the f...
  • Lands Of Various Indian Tribes
    728 words
    United States of America claims to be one of the most democratic countries in the world. Every high school student knows that "democracy" means "government of people", a society where every group's interests are represented and where the supreme power belongs to citizens of this particular country. On the surface, America's system seems to be working well - everybody has a chance to get education, make a good living, and keep his / her historical and cultural identity. Going deeper, however, mig...
  • National Indian Policy
    775 words
    The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to land west of the Mississippi River in the 1830's was more a reformulation of the national policy that had been in effect since the 1790's than a change in the policy. Assess the validility of this generalization with the reference to the moral, political, constitutional, and practical concerns that shaped national Indian policy between 1789 and the mid 1830's. The Removal of the Native Indians to the West Between the 17...
  • The Land The Indians
    3,150 words
    The Effects of the United States Government on the Indians "The responsibility of any nation, and the particular responsibility of elected officials of any nation, is not to justify what has passed for legality but to anticipate the conditions and problems of tomorrow and attempt to deal with them. The current confusion and violence in Indian Country are a result of the failure to do so by generations of elected officials in this country. To continue to perpetuate myths about American Indians wh...
  • Indians And Thought
    641 words
    Indian Project The Indians had every right to fight. Their land was being taken away by the whites. They were forcing them out by starving them and compressing them into small reservations. Many of the Indian leaders had felt safe before the whites began attacking and invading their territory. The whites provoked the Indians into war according to Ten Bears when he said, "My people have never first drawn a bow or fired a gun against the whites. There has been trouble on the line between us, and m...
  • Indians Land
    679 words
    Oklahoma History The Indians contributed to there problem. When the Spanish came to America there was already an indigenous people here. When Christopher Columbus first came over on the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria, He thought they were going to find a passage to India so when they saw the people they called them Indians. In 1803 the immigrants now known as Americans bought some land from the French called the "Louisiana Purchase". The Americans then tried to make the Indians move to the territor...
  • Cherokee Indians
    667 words
    On August 23, the "Trail of Tears" had begun for the Cherokee Indians. The Government (white men) was forcing the Indians of its tribal land to the west to unfavorable land. The Cherokee embarked on the long bitter journey to Oklahoma from Georgia. Make shift stockades were constructed by General Winfield Scott before the actually journey began. The army started to gather Indians on May 23 to put them in the newly constructed stockades (prisons). They Indians were treated unfairly no warning was...
  • Their Land Onto The Indian Territory
    1,263 words
    America Expansion Of 1700'S America Expansion Of 1700'S Essay, Research Paper United States Expansionism: 1790's- 1860's The major American aspiration during the 1790's through the 1860's was westward expansion. Americans looked to the western lands as an opportunity for large amounts of free land, for growth of industry, and manifest destiny. This hunger for more wealth and property, led Americans conquer lands that were rightfully someone else's. Manifest destiny and westward expansion brought...

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