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  • Aristotle's Argument For The Achievement Of Happiness
    2,701 words
    The Greek Philosopher Plato considered a properly led human life, (the good life) to be achieved through harmony (thus of the soul, and of the people in a state). Plato describes the soul as having three parts, which he calls reason, spirit, and appetite. The reason portion of the soul is an awareness of a goal or a value. Spirit, is the drive toward action, which is at first a neutral drive, but responds to the direction of reason. Finally, the appetite is the desire for the things of the body....
  • Happiness In Terms Of Pleasure
    2,259 words
    What Is Happiness, And Is Our Own Happiness The Only Thing We Ultimately Desire Happiness, according not only to utilitarianism but also to popular culture, is something that we should not merely desire, but actively pursue. This seems to be, at first glance, a plausible, indeed laudable, goal, but there is one inherent detail that needs to be explained what happiness actually is. This is especially important in the case of a philosophical doctrine like utilitarianism, to which the idea of happi...
  • Mill's Pleasure Principle
    1,160 words
    JOHN STUART MILL S UTILITARIANISM Along with other noted philosophers, John Stuart Mill developed the nineteenth century philosophy known as Utilitarianism - the contention that man should judge everything in life based upon its ability to promote the greatest individual happiness. While Bentham, in particular, is acknowledged as the philosophy's founder, it was Mill who justified the axiom through reason. He maintained that because human beings are endowed with the ability for conscious thought...
  • Outcomes For The Greatest Happiness
    657 words
    "Utilitarianism" is the ethical doctrine, which essentially states that which is good is that which brings about the most happiness to the most people. John Stuart Mill believed that the decisions we make should always benefit the most people as much as possible regardless of the consequences to the minority or even yourself. He would say all that matters in the decision of right versus wrong is the amount of happiness produced by the consequences. In the decisions we make Mill would say that we...
  • Morality Important To Society
    1,454 words
    Why Should I Be Moral? The question of morality proves to be a complex interrogatory. Should Ibe moral? If I should be, then why? Why is morality important to society? An assumption can be made that morals derive from a purely religious perspective or the Golden Rule approach. We are told that it is right to be moral. This is an ineffective answer, since it does not apply to someone outside the moral circle (Olsen, 79). This in mind, there is really no way to prove this too a person who wants to...
  • Meanings Of Happiness And Pleasure
    2,280 words
    The Principle of Utility A. Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) There are two main people that talked about the principles of utility and they were Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill. First off I'll talk to you about Mr. Bentham. It is helpful to see Bentham's moral philosophy in the context of his political philosophy, his attempt to find a rational approach to law and legislative action. He argued against "natural law" theory and thought that the classical theories of Plato and Aristotle as well as no...
  • Effects Of Actions On The General Happiness
    8,882 words
    UTILITARIANISMbyJohn Stuart Mill (1863) Chapter 2 What Utilitarianism Is. A PASSING remark is all that needs be given to the ignorant blunder of supposing that those who stand up for utility as the test of right and wrong, use the term in that restricted and merely colloquial sense in which utility is opposed to pleasure. An apology is due to the philosophical opponents of utilitarianism, for even the momentary appearance of confounding them with any one capable of so absurd a misconception; whi...
  • Happiness At The End
    1,091 words
    Happiness is the Greatest GoodIn Aristotle's essay, he 'focuses particularly on how reason, our rational capacity, should help us recognize and pursue what will lead to happiness and the good life. ' ; (Cooley and Powell, 459) He refers to the soul as a part of the human body and what its' role is in pursuing true happiness and reaching a desirable end. Aristotle defines 'good'; as that which everything aims. (Aristotle, 459) Humans have an insatiable need to achieve goodness and eventual happin...
  • Epicurean Principle Of Pleasure
    1,275 words
    In comparing the ethical theories of the Epicureans, Aristotle, and the Stoics it's found that they possess three separate ideas. These ideas are different in their individual beliefs; yet attempt to accomplish the same goals of creating an inner peace and sense of well being in their followers. Generally these three disciplines had distinctly separate ideas on how to set about accomplishing these goals; the Epicureans felt that the pursuit of pleasure was the correct path to enlightenment, whil...
  • True Happiness
    758 words
    Happiness The foolish man seeks happiness in the distance, the wise grows it under his feet -James Oppenheim As I gaze out the window in my room, my curiosity keeps me there, wondering what it is that makes a person smile. Do they smile because they are genuinely happy Or because they just heard a funny joke Maybe their smile is just a mask, used to conceal their pathetic, lonely reality. Through speculation and interviews, I have been able to untangle the uncertainty of meaning true happiness. ...
  • Act Utilitarianism
    1,514 words
    Assess the merits of Utilitarianism (24 Marks) Utilitarianism is a theory aimed at defining one simple basis that can be applied when making any ethical decision. It is based on a human's natural instinct to seek pleasure and avoid pain. Jeremy Bentham is widely regarded as the father of utilitarianism. He was born in 1748 into a family of lawyers and was himself, training to join the profession. During this process however, he became disillusioned by the state British law was in and set out to ...
  • Aristotle Moves From Pleasure To Happiness
    5,550 words
    After nine books of contemplating different aspects of the human good, Aristotle uses this opportunity to claim contemplation as the highest form of pleasure. The final book in Nicomachean Ethics is concerned with pleasures: the understanding of each kind, and why some pleasures are better than other pleasures. The book is essentially divided into two main parts, being pleasure and happiness. I will use Terence Irwin's translation and subdivisions as a guiding map for my own enquiry, and any quo...
  • Mill's Higher Lower Pleasure Distinction
    1,416 words
    Ethical Theory, Explain why Mill distinguishes between higher and lower pleasures and assess whether he achieves his aim or not. In his Essay Utilitarianism Mill elaborates on Utilitarianism as a moral theory and responds to misconceptions about it. Utilitarianism, in Mill's words, is the view that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness. 1 In that way, Utilitarianism offers an answer to the fundamental question Et...
  • Superior To The Physical Pleasures And Mill
    1,160 words
    Hedonism Webster's dictionary defines hedonism as "the ethical doctrine that pleasure, variously conceived of in terms of happiness of the individual or of society, is the principal good and the proper aim of action" or "the theory that a person always acts is such a way as to seek pleasure and avoid pain". With this definition in mind, and with further examination of John Stuart Mill's theory on hedonism, I am going to argue that hedonism is not an exclusive or distinct way of thinking. In fact...
  • Higher And Lower Pleasures
    1,139 words
    Why Has J.S. Mills Version Of Utilitarianism Proved To Be More Acceptable Than Bentham Utilitarianism began life as an ethical principle under Jeremy Bentham who theorise d that an action if right if it produces the greatest good for the greatest number of people. In its original form the argument had many flaws so John Stuart Mill decided to defend the principle of Utility against its critics by refining its ideas making them more practical in society. Jeremy Benthams theory of Utilitarianism w...
  • Pleasurable Consequences
    984 words
    In discussing matters of right and wrong, it is essential to first lay down the foundation of these concepts. These terms are indeed concepts because they hold no certain truth to the general society. True, righteousness may be a measurement of happiness, lack of pain, or a circumstantial mode of contentment, however, if you consider one persons happiness to be another persons pain, then what is the true measurement of right We see that there are actually two distinct aspects to this question, a...
  • Happy And The Highest Good
    948 words
    There has been Aristotle Aristotle There has been a great debate over the highest human good and whether happiness is the highest good. Philosophers have said that the highest good is happiness. Others have said that it is piety. Aristotle insists that all human beings desire to be happy and the highest good is happiness. But what is happiness? If I am smiling does that mean I m happy? If someone wants to be lonely is that mean to be lonely can be happiness? For instance, an old man decided natu...

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