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  • Natural Aspect Of A Scientific Theory
    630 words
    Samir Kumar September 15, 1996 ANALYSIS OF THE OPINION OF JUDGE WILLIAM R. OVERTON Judge William R. Overton sets out five criteria in examining the validity of "creation science" as a scientific theory in the case McLean vs. Arkansas. Two of these characteristics are testability against the empirical world and the tentativeness of a theory's conclusion. Overton explains why he thinks these criteria are important and why creation science fails to satisfy them. Overton feels that testability again...
  • Popper's View Of Science
    1,542 words
    Popper and Kuhn: Two Views of Science In this essay I attempt to answer the following two questions: What is Karl Popper's view of science? Do I feel that Thomas Kuhn makes important points against it? The two articles that I make reference to are 'Science: Conjectures and Refutations' by Karl Popper and 'Logic of Discovery or Psychology of Research?' by Thomas Kuhn. Both articles appear in the textbook to this class. In the article, 'Science: Conjectures and Refutations', Karl Popper attempts t...
  • Scientific Theories And Laws
    1,206 words
    ... re to get a specific result. In that case, there may be a psychological tendency to find 'something wrong', such as systematic effects, with data which do not support the scientist's expectations, while data which do agree with those expectations may not be checked as carefully. The lesson is that all data must be handled in the same way. Another common mistake arises from the failure to estimate quantitatively systematic errors (and all errors). There are many examples of discoveries which ...
  • Theory Of Phlogiston
    5,217 words
    Phlogiston TheoryAccording to the phlogiston theory, propounded in the 17th century, every combustible substance consisted of a hypothetical principle of fire known as phlogiston,which was liberated through burning, and a residue. The word phlogiston was first used early in the 18th century by the German chemist Georg Ernst Stahl. Stahldeclared that the rusting of iron was also a form of burning in which phlogiston was freed and the metal reduced to an ash or calx. The theory was supersededbetwe...
  • Pseudo Scientific Theory
    587 words
    In the history of mankind, we have strived to understand the world around us, to know and understand how and why things happen. Thus, science was born. Pseudo-science was born, as well. A science tries to explain how and why things happen by creating laws that dictate what Nature does. A pseudo-science is something that claims to be scientific, but really isn't. Some examples of pseudo-science include things like astrology, numerology, and other so-called "sciences". The laws of a science are ba...
  • Truth Of Scientific Theories
    1,489 words
    Does science consist in the progressive development of objective truth? Contrast the views of Kuhn with one other writer on this topic. The philosopher and historian of science Thomas Kuhn introduced the term paradigm as a key part of what he called "normal science": In normal (that is non revolutionary) periods in a science, there is a consensus across the relevant scientific community about the theoretical and methodological rules to be followed. (Marshall 1998). Paradigms tend to shift over t...
  • Work On His Theories
    790 words
    Galileo Galilei Galileo was probably the greatest astronomer, mathematician and scientist of his time. In fact his work has been very important in many scientific advances even to this day. Galileo was born in Pisa, Italy on February 15th, 1564. His father, Vincenzo was a music teacher and musician. After his family moved to Florence, Galilei was sent to a monastery to be educated. He was so happy there that he decided to become a monk, but his father wanted him to be a medical doctor and brough...
  • 17th Century With The Scientific Method
    2,410 words
    REVOLUTION-Key Contributions to the Scientific Revolution of the 17th and 18th centuries The Scientific Revolution brought about a change in the Western world. Prior to the 17th and 18th centuries, many Europeans strongly believed in the Aristotelian-Ptolemaic ideology of the physical world. When these ideas were replaced by Copernicus's heliocentric theory in the 16th century, other scientists had the opportunity to offer their input on the complexity of the physical world surrounding them. Imp...
  • New Scientific Theories
    765 words
    Scientific Revolution and Political Ideas There are many people that did more than there share at finding out new scientific theories. Such as Copernicus, Columbus, Kepler, Galilei, Bacon, Descartes, Newton, Vesalius, Harvey, Hooke, Boyle, Priestley, A. Lavoisier, and M. Lavoisier are all people who helped with a scientific revolution. Yes, I know there are a lot of names but I will try to present most of their theories. Copernicus thought that the earth was round and that it rotated on its axis...
  • Schlick's Theory On True Meaning
    1,756 words
    The Search for Truth What is metaphysics The question itself is a study in the answer, as to question the meaning of truth is to compare and contrast it to all that we perceive from our senses as real. The principle of verifiability was at the core of Logical Positivism, the movement that sought to apply logic and the methodology of the empirical sciences to all fields of thought. It states that a theory, or more generally a sentence, that is not at least capable of empirical verification is mea...
  • Non Scientific Theories
    706 words
    There is often a heated debate on whether or not a theory is scientific. This debate brings to light a problem named the demarcation problem. This problem simply asks how one distinguishes between science and non-science. This is a very important question especially in examining separation of church and state. The demarcation problem is apparent when schools are unsure as to whether or not they should teach creationism as a possible scientific theory. Schools are to teach science, but how does o...
  • Political Theory Versus Scientific Theory
    1,197 words
    Political Theory versus Scientific Theory Theory is ubiquitous. Everyone is a theorist. A theory is generally stated to be an idea or belief one has formulated that is to be tested by others. Theory abstracts and generalizes from specific circumstances, and enhances the accessibility of experience. They are often more general and abstract then the facts they attempt to explain, therefore, alluding to more than just facts. Theories are functions of indirection, whereas facts are a matter of direc...
  • Scientific Inaccuracies In Evolutionary Theory
    1,033 words
    The proponents and opponents of Evolutionary Theory have subjected it to scrutiny resulting in its emergence as a cornerstone for biological science. It has endured a trial-and-error process originating in philosophical inquiry over a thousand years ago, to scientific validity today. Evolutionary Theory's impact in science, education, and even religion moves our nation toward more rational explanations for humankind's origins and current state of being. Charles Darwin, a British naturalist, is c...
  • Search For Unity In Hidden Likenesses
    723 words
    Bronowski makes generations in the course of "The Nature of Scientific Reasoning". Among these generalization is: "No scientific theory is a collection of fact" (Paragraph 7); "All science is the search for unity in hidden likeness" (Paragraph 8); and "It grows from comparison" (Paragraph 12). A scientific theory can either be true or false or false. When it is true that means that some evidence based on experiments or observations, such as the rising of the sun from the East. When a scientific ...
  • Unquestionable Correctness Of Science And Scientific Research
    1,338 words
    'There are several different criticisms that have been commonly levelled at science and scientists as a whole.? During the course of this essay I shall attempt to identify these criticisms and identify the reasoning behind each of them. The first of these criticisms is that science has been given similar status to a religion. It was commonly thought in the early days of science that science would eventually develop a theory for everything, thereby replacing religion through removing the ambiguou...

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