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  • Socrates Escape From Prison
    1,132 words
    In Crito, Plato recounts the last days of Socrates, immediately before his execution was to take place in Athens. In the dialogue, Socrates' pupil, Crito, proposes that Socrates escape from prison. Socrates considers this proposal, trying to decide whether escaping would be "just" and "morally justified". Eventually, Socrates concludes that the act is considered "unjust" and "morally unjustified". Socrates then decides to accept his fate and proceeded with his execution. Socrates was a man who w...
  • Aristotle's Criticisms Of Socrates Proposal
    1,203 words
    Aristotle's Successful Attack on Socrates Proposal: Should Women and Children Be Held in Common In Aristotle's Politics, Aristotle successfully criticizes Socrates proposal of having wives and children in common (Plato 449d) by pointing out a number of flaws in Socrates proposal. In the following pages, I will explain the view held by Socrates that women and children should be held in common as well as the reasoning behind his view as reported in Plato's Republic. Second, I will explain Aristotl...
  • Socrate's Teachings
    839 words
    Socrates' Moral Decision To Not Escape Was Socrates wise to stay in Athens to die? Examine firstly the context of the word wise, Socrates wasn't wise in the sense of preserving his own life as he stayed to die. He was encouraged and given the chance to escape by his friend Crito, but Socrates did not want to escape. Why? Socrates was a wise man. He believed in absolutes, and pursued the knowledge of man's source of goodness and virtue. He believed that the repayment of evil with evil was wrong. ...
  • Different Classes The City
    430 words
    The Noble Lie In book, Socrates begins to describe criteria for an ideal city. Socrates begins by describing who should rule this ideal city. He feels that they must choose guardians who have the state's interest at heart, because they see it identical with their own interest. Socrates feels that the guardians will be the backbone of the state who will protect the state and the people. And, that the guardians will help to provide the education to the people. Once Socrates establishes the idea of...
  • Antigone Believes In Divine Law
    700 words
    Antigone vs. Socrates In the plays Antigone and the Crito the two lead characters, Antigone and Socrates, showed completely different ideas regarding their responsibilities to the State. Antigone believes in divine law and does what she thinks that the Gods would want her to do. Socrates, on the other hand, believes that he owes it to the State to follow their laws whether he thinks they are right or not. In Antigone, her brother Polynices, turned against his own city by attacking his own brothe...
  • Socrates States To The Jury
    2,388 words
    Plato. The Last Days of Socrates. London: Penguin Books Ltd., 1993 Imagine the time just after the death of Socrates. The people of Athens were filled with questions about the final judgment of this well-known, long-time citizen of Athens. Socrates was accused at the end of his life of impiety and corruption of youth. Rumors, prejudices, and questions flew about the town. Plato experienced this situation when Socrates, his teacher and friend, accepted the ruling of death from an Athenian court. ...
  • Crito's Arguments For Socrates Escape
    735 words
    The dialogue of The Crito, by Plato, recounts the last days of Socrates, immediately before his execution was going to take place in Athens. In the dialogue, Socrates friend, Crito, proposes that Socrates escape from prison. Socrates considers this proposal, trying to decide if escaping would be just and morally justified. Socrates argues against his escape by relating the regulations of the state to the duties of citizens within the state. Socrates sees his execution as a justified because he t...
  • Meletos Charges Socrates
    900 words
    The accusers, Meletos, Any tos, and Lycos, are all young and trying to make a name for themselves. They begin by telling everyone not to be deceived and to take caution because Socrates is a "clever speaker". According to Socrates, the difference between him and his accusers is that he speaks the truth. He is on trial for two items, which include, corrupting the youth and impiety. Socrates tells everyone that he has no experience with the court and he will speak the way he is used to by being ho...
  • Plato's Second Trip To Syracuse
    1,792 words
    Philosopher. According to sources, Plato was born on or around May 21,427 (or 428) B.C. in Athens, the son of Ariston and Perictione, both of Athenian aristocratic ancestry. He lived his whole life in Athens, although he traveled to Sicily and southern Italy on several occasions, and one story says he traveled to Egypt. Little is known of his early years, but he was given the finest education Athens had to offer the scions of its noble families, and he devoted his considerable talents to politic...
  • Response To Crito's Argument Of Socrates
    827 words
    1. Crito's Arguments The arguments of Crito are centred and clear. He uses simple persuasion to try and convince Socrates to escape. His arguments push the idea that Socrates should attempt escape for the sake of others, namely his children, friends and the many. Crito points out that other men would have no hesitation in escaping, despite their age. This is dismissed when Socrates states that someone who has lived so long should rejoice in the fact that they have had such a full life. Some of t...
  • Wrong And Fulfillment Of One's Obligations
    464 words
    Analysis of Crito The question is raised within the dialogue between Socrates and Crito concerning civil disobedience. Crito has the desire, the means, and many compelling reasons with which he tries to convince the condemned to acquiesce in the plan to avoid his imminent death. Though Crito's temptation is imposing, its in accord with reason and fidelity that Socrates chooses to fulfill his obligation to the state, even to death. Before addressing Crito's claims which exhort Socrates to leave t...
  • Opinion Of The Majority On Socrates Fate
    1,448 words
    The purpose of 'Crito's seems intended to exhibit the character of Socrates in one light only, not as the philosopher, fulfilling a divine mission and trusting in the will of Heaven, but simply as the good citizen, who, having been unjustly condemned is willing to give up his life in obedience to the laws of the State. The main argument that seems to entail the discussion between Crito and Socrates is the opinion of the majority on Socrates' fate. In the 'Crito's socrates states, 'Why should we ...
  • Parents And The Citizens
    684 words
    Socrates Paper The duty between a citizen and the law and vice versa has been a challenging question that many individuals have been trying to answer for centuries. Throughout history many philosophers, historians, writers etc. have tried and to some extent in their best opinion come up with an answer. Plato, who through Socratic dialogues of the human soul provides a window for understanding the nature of the state, made one such attempt. In his famous dialogue, the Apology, which is a defense ...
  • Plato Through His Mouthpiece Socrates
    5,650 words
    At the beginning of Book I, we are introduced to the narrator, Socrates, and his audience of peers. We are made aware, however, of Socrates's pe cial charm and intellectual gifts through the insistence of Polemarchus and the other men for the pleasure of his company. The tone is casual and language and modes of expression rather simple, as is commonly the case in Plato's dialogues. However, Plato's unaffected style serves at least two purposes. For one it belies the complexity and elevation of t...
  • My View Socrates Siding With Antigone
    1,400 words
    Socrates's ides With? Through my reading of Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito, I have been able to see how Socrates makes important decisions and what he primarily bases his decisions on. As a individual person we have individual morals which lead us to our own moral or immoral decisions. Sometimes are own morals or beliefs might oppose the views of the state or the enforced law that clams to find justice. In this case we rely on our own beliefs that may be through passed down morals or thro...
  • State Sentences Socrates To Death
    2,554 words
    JUSTICE SERVED What is the relation of the state to the individual Should obedience be paid to the will of the state, or to the justice with which it conflicts If loyalty is required, is it conditional; necessary only part of the time And, given that the state and the individual will inevitably disagree on some issues, who suffers in the end Through their writings, Plato and Sophocles outline two sides of this issue. In Euthyphro, The Apology, and Crito Plato expresses a view of the state as fla...
  • Greek Army
    690 words
    Ancient Greece Study Guide 1. a city-state is a city and it,'s surrounding land, controlled by one ruler. Athens, Sparta, and Crete. 2. (1) an explanation for physical phenomenon (2) an explanation for passion (3) a means for attaining success 3. on top of Mt. Olympus 4. people ruled themselves. Democracy 5. b / c all males were raised to be soldiers. Armed forces were used to control the helot slaves 6. where citizens are directly involved. Where citizens elect representatives 7. representative...
  • Most Important To Socrates
    952 words
    In The Republic, Socrates tests the proper order that exists between reason, spirit and desire. He did this by questioning others of their beliefs and their thoughts. He would raise doubts in their time old teachings in order to prove them wrong and raise contradictions. Socrates taught people in this way as opposed to preaching to the groups that he would attract. The proper order that Socrates held was that reason came first above all, then spirit and lastly, desire. This is correct because of...
  • Definition Of Tragedy
    477 words
    Aristotle's Definition Of A Tragedy Essay, ResearchAristotle's Definition Of A Tragedy According to Aristotle, a tragedy is defined by a number of characteristics. The plot must have a major changing point in which a discovery is made and there must be suffering. (Aristotle 638). The main character must also be good, appropriate, realistic, and consistent. The people must be able to sympathize with him (Aristotle 643). Using this definition of tragedy, one can apply it and come to the conclusion...

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