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  • Churchill From Prime Minister Baldwin
    3,660 words
    Churchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was born at Blenheim Palace, his family's ancestral seat in Oxfordshire, on November 30, 1874. He was the older son of Lord Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill, a British statesman who rose to be chancellor of the Exchequer and leader of the House of Commons. His mother was an American, Jennie Jerome, the daughter of a New York financier. Churchill inherited a family tradition of statesmanship that went back to the great English general John Churchil...
  • Germany A Cousin Of Britain
    3,470 words
    email: appeasement in Britain In the aftermath of World War 2, the British policy of appeasement, especially as to Germany, was considered one of weakness and inability, globally condemned by immediate post-war historians. Some historians, such as A.J.P. Taylor, go as far as making appeasement a direct cause of the war, arguing that Hitler was only a pragmatic politician reacting to his opponents mistakes, taking advantage of the situations Britain created for him. The war, he argued, was just a...
  • Chamberlain's Use Of Appeasement Against Hitler
    2,323 words
    TITLE: Why did the British government follow a policy of appeasement in the 1930's After World War I Germany limped back, licking its wounds that the Treaty of Versailles had so mercilessly rubbed in salt. As one looks back on the events leading up to World War II it has to be asked whether France and England helped to start World War II by their actions at Versailles. It seems that the revenge that the Allies took at the Treaty came back to haunt them with the aggression of Hitler in 1936. Howe...
  • Most Important Reason For Britain
    1,973 words
    After the end of the Second World War in which, to Britain, it was nearly a repeat of the First World War that Britain had experienced the same things as the aftermaths. The war put severe strains on her economic resources as well as the undermining of her export markets. Even though Britain had won the war, the impacts on Britain afterwards were not always positive, in that, as everyone know, war created tragedy. It did not make any good to anybody, even the winner. The victors also had to spen...
  • End Of The War Hitler
    844 words
    War is one of the most tragic things in our world today. It is even sadder that usually it comes around at least once in our lifetime. In the 20th century alone we have already had two huge wars. These wars were call the World Wars simply because they involved most of the big countries of the world. Many people have died in these wars... especially the second World War. That is my focus for this essay. The leader of Germany at the time of WWII and the person who most think started WWII was man n...
  • Wars Of Expansion
    320 words
    Unlikely frontiers by choice, no decision to halt. Governor who wanted to earn respect by expanding his province frontiers congealed around the orders of the empire: they arose by default Disapproval by writers of unprofitable expansion Britain not really worth it implication not resist profitable expansion, Claudius desires honour of taking Britain. No difficult in asserting little economic r financial reason Aims of war adjusted according to wars balance between defence and conquest. Existing ...
  • World War
    1,750 words
    8 Aug 2002 WAR AFTER NAPOLEON TO WORLD WAR II After the defeat of Napoleon and the French Empire, the world looked favorably upon options for peace. The greatest sea power of the time was Britain, and with the goal of controlling the free trade, the island country looked to make the waters more advantageous. The British government realized that a countries wealth was not going to be possessed by an expanding empire, but by the profitable growth of commercial trade. The oceans were looked at as a...
  • War On Britain In 1812
    499 words
    The War of 1812 The war of 1812, supposedly fought over neutral trading rights, was a very peculiar conflict indeed. Britain's trade restrictions, one of the main causes, were removed two days before the war started; the New Englanders, for whom the war was supposedly fought, opposed it; the most decisive battle, at New Orleans, was fought after the war ended. During the Napoleonic wars, Britain and France had disrupted US shipping, confiscated American goods, taking US seamen into the British n...
  • Summer Of 1941 German Bombers
    738 words
    The Impact of War at Home When war was declared, there were no celebrations. Instead the government took immediate action, and emergency powers, everyone was issued with gas masks in 1938. The bombing power of the Germans was something that was feared greatly by those that remembered the first war, and by the government, who knew that German bombers were now very advanced. Between the 1st and 3rd of September over one million people were evacuated, as the government were particularly worried abo...
  • One Man In The British Empire
    2,263 words
    Those eleven burning words summed up the nature of Britain's war, turned Britain's back on the weaknesses of the past, set her face toward the unknown future. Because of them the rest of that speech has been forgotten. It should not be forgotten, for it is not only a great example of Winston Churchill's eloquence, but the epitome of the movement which he leads. After a brief report on the formation of his Government, Winston Churchill said: 'You ask, what is our policy? I say it is to wage war b...
  • War For Many Reasons
    648 words
    In 1914, Australia joined the First World War. Although it was seen as a European war, the Australia government decided that Australia should support its 'Mother Country', Britain. The prime-minister at the time, Joseph Cook, stated Australia's position: "Whatever happens, Australia is a part of the Empire, right to the full. When the Empire is at war, Australia is at war". Many Australians objected to the country's involvement in the war, but the majority of the population agreed with the gover...
  • Distance Between Britain And The Falkland Islands
    3,650 words
    The Falkland Islands Conflict No one really knows who discovered the Falkland Islands. Nearly every British historian will insist that the English explorer John Davis discovered the islands in 1592 (1) while Argentineans typically credit Vespucci, Magellan, or Se bald de We ert. (2) The events of January 2, 1883 are not in dispute, however. On this date, James Onslow, captain of the HMS Clio, dropped anchor just off the Falklands. The next day he went ashore and raised the British flag. (3) This...
  • Disraelis Foreign And Imperialist Policies
    1,334 words
    How Far Did Disraelis Conduct In Foreign Policy And Imperial Affairs Deserve The Criticism It Received He was essentially an opportunist and always placed Britains immediate interests above any underlying principle or moral consideration. (Lee) The above quotation describes Disraeli very well. His primary and permanently sustained goal was his own political career, and the short-term interests of Britain. This can be seen as both a criticism and a positive aspect. Such a description is justified...
  • Ss Parliament
    218 words
    Revolutionary War: Dates: April 1775 - October 1781 Countries involved: 13 colonies vs. Great Britain Causes of war: SS Parliament still maintained its right to legislate for the colonies SS American insisted that they should not have to pay taxes levied by Parliament SS Boston Tea Party: with Parliament controlling the tea trading, Americans thought they could arrange for other monopolies for other products. Parliament thought that they had a right to tax colonies-this led to preventing the sal...
  • Palmerston's First Obvious Failure In Foreign Affairs
    1,878 words
    Between 1846 and 1865, Palmerston held office either as Prime Minister of Foreign secretary. Even as Prime Minister, Palmerston was interventionist in foreign affairs. Palmerston popularized foreign affairs in that he became the embodiment of British Foreign policy. Palmerston officiated foreign affairs when Britain was the dominant world force. The principles of British foreign policy were established in 1815, at the end of the Napoleonic Wars, these were four-fold. They were firstly to maintai...
  • France And Russia Britain
    1,893 words
    Britain went to war in 1914 to defend the integrity of 'gallant little Belgium' Britain's decision to go to war in 1914 was not simply to defend the integrity of France's small neighbouring country. A variety of political, social and economical reasons contributed to the decision, almost all of which can be disputed by different historians. Britain's obligations to Belgium went back nearly a hundred years into history. After France invaded Belgium in 1815 Belgium became part of the Netherlands u...
  • Trajan
    356 words
    It was the second century of the Christian Era, 98-180 A. D and the Roman Empire was regarded as the most civilized section of mankind. It was run by Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, and the two Antoninus and everything was well and in the lap of luxury, and then came Augustus, who transformed the republic into an autocracy. Their first successful take over was the region of Britain with a war that took on for forty years. Emperor Trajan took over Augustus and he too was a very ruthless leader. But even ...
  • War On Britain In 1812
    413 words
    What led Americans to declare war on Britain in 1812? For more than five years, tensions had grown between the United States and European nations. After years of failed negotiations, some Americans decided it was time for a war. Americans claimed that their right to trade and use the sea was violated by Great Britain. American ships were being seized, cargoes were stolen, and sailors had been kidnapped. Great Britain was in clear violation of the rights of America's use of the sea. The only opti...
  • Responsibility Of Chamberlain's Policy
    1,900 words
    Appeasement was the policy adopted by Neville Chamberlain and his fellow politicians in the 1930's, in order to avoid war with Hitler. This policy culminated in three trips to meet Hitler in Munich, although these meetings ultimately ended in failure, resulting in the outbreak of war in September 1939, the policy itself is a contentiously debated issue. Especially in the latter part of the twentieth century, many historians have come out in support of Chamberlain, but equally the policy has been...
  • War On America
    334 words
    1) Many Americans had come to accept that Britain should be given some help, mainly, because France had just fallen to the Germans. The shock of how big a threat Germany was to Britain had just dawned on most Americans. Britain had also used propaganda, screening videos of Britain being bombed. In the paper it showed pictures of rundown city's, and people gathering their belonging from the wrecks of the city. This propaganda mad e people feel sorry for the British. They also thought that Hitler ...

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